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Messages - GoSouthYoungins

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1
Policy and solutions / Re: Tesla glory/failure
« on: December 06, 2019, 04:17:03 AM »
As for believing that nobody needs personal vehicles? That is normally a position held by City dwellers and students who have 0% visibility of the real world.

Those of us who live in the country know different.

Most people who live in rural places don't own a car. First-worlders are extremely first-world-centric and struggle to understand how anyone could live without all the high energy luxuries they see as essential.

Approximately 1% of people who have ever lived have owned a car. So, cars are a super luxury and totally unnecessary.

But hey, Neil thinks his ride is an imperative, and he is never totally wrong.

2
Policy and solutions / Re: Tesla glory/failure
« on: November 23, 2019, 03:01:33 PM »
Rivian’s R1T pickup starts at $69k.  For about that price, you could get a cybertruck with 2.9 second 0-60, more (500+ mile) range, and 50% more towing capacity.  The cybertruck is not just a pickup truck. It is a utility truck with sports car performance.

Actually you couldn't.

It isn't a utility truck. It isn't a sports car. It isn't really anything other than a stage prop and some made-up specs (including bulletproof)  ;)

3
Policy and solutions / Re: Tesla glory/failure
« on: November 10, 2019, 03:11:59 PM »
https://buffalonews.com/2019/11/08/pennies-on-the-dollar-the-tesla-plant-isnt-worth-nearly-what-the-state-paid-to-build-it/

What happens when you give fElon $1 Billion taxpayer dollars? He turns it into $75 Million for you in a few short years.

New York State spent $958.6 million to build Tesla Inc.'s solar panel factory in South Buffalo and buy a big chunk of the equipment inside.

Now, auditors are saying the building and all that equipment is worth just under $75 million

4
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: November 09, 2019, 12:46:04 PM »
That's how we roll in Germany. On Sundays, we meet in big townhalls and consume energy never produced. Great tradition!

It seems like you are making fun of the idea that produced energy and consumed energy are different.

Wind and solar are the most scale-able renewables but they are also notorious for producing energy at somewhat unpredictable times but more importantly on their own schedule.

If you had a magic solar beam array, and one day every the sun shot an incredible amount on energy at the beam, you could double or triple your annual energy production. But it would do basically nothing for the energy consumption mix or emissions at large.

There is not a proportional reduction in emissions relative to the increase in renewables.

5
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: November 09, 2019, 05:11:25 AM »
German electricity come mostly from fossil fuels.

Bullshit!

https://www.energy-charts.de/energy_de.htm?source=all-sources&period=annual&year=2019

Lol. I guess I should have been more specific. Last year only 46% of German electricity production was from fossil fuels. BUT the majority of consumed electricity was from fossil fuels. Unconsumed electricity is totally pointless.

Also, the Biofuels are not considered fossil fuels BUT its mostly corn which burns as much fossil fuel energy in its production as the energy it produces. (It's also cow shit, which is even worse due to methane production.) So biofuels are probably actually even worse emitters than the energy equivalent fossil fuels.

And, nuclear is going bye bye.

So it really isn't bullshit. Most of the electricity consumed in Germany comes from fossil fuels. This might change in the next 5 years, but the nuclear phase out will make it tough.

You were right about one thing though. The cow manure part is the worst, and it is bullshit.

6
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: November 08, 2019, 02:21:48 PM »
As I commented to Neven, running a Tesla on main grid in the US would not meet the current EU regulations for g/km CO2.  Germany is at the upper end in the EU at 77g for an EV charging, on average, on the grid.

German electricity come mostly from fossil fuels. Also, you totally fail to respond to my point that EVERY step of EV creation and operates uses fossil fuels for all or most of the energy required.

As for products which have not even been invented yet?  Solar Roof 3?  Invented, manufactured, delivered in test samples.  Announced as a product to be ordered from the website with "short term" delivery times.

Solar Roof 1 was totally fake. Solar Roof 2 wasn't even fake, just never existed even as a concept. But Solar Roof 3 you have faith in. Okay.

7
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: November 08, 2019, 01:46:12 PM »
You will note I didn't need to bold that. Tesla does the bolding for me.

Announcing revolutionary products that you haven't invented yet is indeed bold. If that's butter's your bagel, fair enough. I think it is madness and clear fraud. One man's trash...

(Let's leave this for the other thread.)

As a consolation I watch Tesla and their excellent approach to EV and other FF free initiatives destroy you corrosive beliefs as time goes by..

EVs are an excellent approach to personal passenger vehicles. They are far from fossil fuel free. And they are far from helpful in fighting climate change. Every component is made with fossil fuel energy, from materials gathered using fossil fuel energy. And most of the electricity generation for EVs come from burning fossil fuels.

If you take climate change seriously, you should understand that we can't transition to a more populated and equitable world AND have EVs just replacing ICE vehicles while we hope to one day replace the fossil fuels so crucial to every step of the manufacturing and operating EVs.

You are probably old, and don't care. You want a fast luxury car and to be able to act like you are doing your part. For you people, Tesla is perfect.

8
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: November 08, 2019, 04:11:40 AM »
You have blinkers on.  When we call you on it, instead of proving your point, you call us names and provide cherry picked figures.

A single example please.

Erm, let me see.

How about Tesla is going to fail in Jan 2019 and Giga3 is going to be a mud field when it fails?

No?

Tesla cannot manufacture cars at a profit, not even one, they will have to keep borrowing forever and will eventually go bust?

No?

Solar roof 3 is a fake and they will never ship any?

Granted that one needs a little time to play out....

For each of these predictions we were roundly abused for doubting you and called idiots and morons.

Tick Tock.

That's all you got? Seriously.

1)They should have filed long ago to keep the brand alive. Now it is liquidation.

1a)Let's see what happens when the 1 year lease ends.

2)I'm totally correct. Tesla never has manufactured cars at a profit. When they push costs and revenue forwards and backwards, they can create a profitable quarter or two. BUT THE BEST 4 QUARTERS IN A ROW THEY HAVE MANAGED IN THE PAST 5 YEARS (before they had practically any competition) WAS A $330 MILLION LOSS. THE AVERAGE LOSS IS JUST UNDER A BILLION ****ING DOLLARS.

3)I CAN'T EVEN BELIEVE THAT YOU WOULD BRING UP THE SOLAR ROOF IN A LIST OF THINGS IM "WRONG" ABOUT AND IGNORING. WTF!!!!!!!!!!!

9
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: November 07, 2019, 02:54:33 PM »
You have blinkers on.  When we call you on it, instead of proving your point, you call us names and provide cherry picked figures.

A single example please.

10
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: November 07, 2019, 02:31:48 PM »
Sequential posting is tight.

How weird is it that fElon Muskian Cultist are opposed to the EVs from non Tesla brands!?! To the point of mocking them. How much of a zealot does that make a person!?!

11
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: November 07, 2019, 02:26:23 PM »
Quote
I was told "sig" has blocked you from personal messaging.
This happens automatically when the user has put you on the ignore list, it's not a separate blocking as far as I know.
As your numerous and often sequential posts are low on content and high on mockery and name calling, I expect Sig is is not the only one to have taken the rational route and blocked you.

Sig posts more numerous and often sequential posts than anyone else on this forum. By far. And the content is blah twitter post from cultists.

I at least have something to say. I call ppl names when they earn them. Ain't nothing wrong with calling a spade, a spade.


What would the price of emitting carbon have to be, to make solar or wind cheaper than natural gas? (Full stop integrated pricing. Yes solar and wind can produce intermittent cheap energy. But the cost to make it dependable is significant.)

I never ignore ppl. I can just glace over the content if I want. Ignoring is for those with serious cognitive dissonance which they desire to be left unresolved.

12
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: November 07, 2019, 04:37:12 AM »
Fun times. Tried to send a message to "Sig" today. As follows...

So we are like opposites.

But I think we want the same shit.

So that is interesting.


If you are interested in actually conversing privately, and learning about one another and our perspectives, please let me know.



But I was told "sig" has blocked you from personal messaging.

The Tesla Cultist really are zealots (and apparently dangerous/bad ppl).

13
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« on: November 07, 2019, 04:23:43 AM »
This is where "the action" will be this freezing season...


There isn't really much thick ice to export. So it is all about pacific intrusion.

14
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: November 07, 2019, 03:03:08 AM »
EVs are currently for the top 2% of CO2 emitters globally. (So the super-emitters can tell everyone about how much they are part of the solution.)

Personal passengers vehicles have no place in a sustainable world. Duh.

15
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« on: November 05, 2019, 06:32:21 AM »
How much Bering ice will form?

How weak and thin will the Chukchi ice be?

How much will this lack of buffer effect early melt?


I think this next year may see severe anomalies and its effects may penetrate into the central arctic.

16
Policy and solutions / Re: Electric cars
« on: November 05, 2019, 06:25:08 AM »
The world is the shape it is today because of centuries of progress.  It will not just change to something else because we deny ourselves the fruits of that progress.  It will change to something else by using the fruits of that progress to go forward to a better world.

Yes, that something else will be 3 to 4 °C of warming. For starters.

Quote
A retrograde society stagnates and stagnated evolution is pruned by nature pretty quickly.  If you could find a talking Dodo, they could explain it to us.

Dodo explains: Homo sapiens exterminated us.

I know I'm living in Austria, and so I should shut up. I also don't know a poor man who couldn't bike to work, and so praise Tesla SUVs. But my problem is not with your viewpoint, my problem is that it isn't your viewpoint. It's conditioned, regurgitated, unimaginative thought that you are just repeating like the obedient schoolboy you have been all your life (and taght your children to be as well). That's how we got here.

And now you're fighting for that conditioned thought to remain dominant, even though the numbers show you where it'll lead to: 3 to 4 °C warming, for starters. And numbers are supposed to be your forte. I guess you expect your offspring will be useful enough to concentrated wealth to be allowed to enter Elysium.

Why don't you go to some forum for old folks who think neoliberalism is the god that ended all gods, and complain about stupid, radical, ungrateful young people there? Hail the system, our benefactor, and may it live forever, and all that.

We already live in a retrograde, stagnated society. We've been living in it for decades and it won't change into 'something else', unless systemic, radical changes are implemented. You may not like that, but that's because you're old and your brain is too conditioned to adapt. Support the young, instead of keeping them down, and maybe one day they'll forgive you.

THIS!

*UCKING THIS!


Also, I'm kinda jealous that you live in Austria.


The good news is that Neil's kin will not survive the purge. And Elysium will not exist.

Society stagnated when we went off the gold standard. (well we kinda went off the gold standard because society stagnated, and thus we had to goose the numbers the ppl in power wanted to fake the numbers change the numbers on the ruler, but that is another story.)

A new way of thinking is required. Places like this should/could/can be the breeding grounds for such ideas/perspectives.


Personal EVs have no place in a equitable and sustainable world. FUCKING NONE.

17
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019/2020 freezing season
« on: October 26, 2019, 04:24:22 PM »
Early loss of ice area inside the Arctic Basin as well as outside easily explains the accumulated heat. Check out the series of attached charts (big thanks to Tealight / Nico Sun for providing these in real time). Note the AWP calculation does not take clouds/weather into account, just solar angles and ice/water albedo.
Not surprisingly, the same areas with the highest anomalies are the same ones with relatively delayed refreeze. I expect this pattern to continue in November and December.

Spot on. The AWP matches the SST map almost perfectly. Except for one area, the Laptev bite.

The atlantification has caused the upwelling to be warmer (probably), and the ice pack mobility has allowed the ice in the area to consistently move toward the fram strait (definitely).

I expect this will last several more weeks, and in the next few years become almost a year-round feature.

A similar thing seems to be happening  in the lincoln sea, but there is just a lot more thicker ice in the area.

18
Policy and solutions / Re: Renewable Energy
« on: October 23, 2019, 05:02:38 PM »
Tesla guarantees you will save money with solar!

Just like those cars with "FSD hardware" which will be "appreciating assets"! LOL. How is that working out.

Tesla guarantees are worth NOTHING.

19
Arctic sea ice / Re: Global sea ice area and extent data
« on: October 11, 2019, 08:19:54 AM »
 ;D 8) :P

winning

(I hate it when we aren't in first.)

20
Policy and solutions / Re: Tesla glory/failure
« on: October 02, 2019, 04:21:04 PM »
When we get the next load of DOOM BANKRUPTCY from gsy, here is some context.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-10-01/toyota-typifies-ugly-month-with-16-slide-auto-sales-update
Grim Start to U.S. Auto Sales Stirs Alarm That Collapse Is Here
- Toyota, Honda, Nissan suffer double-digit drops in September

Hey gerontocrap, I have never said anything like, "OMG the sales from Tesla aren't big enough, so they are totally going bankrupt."

Tesla is going BK because they lose money and will never make money and that dynamic is baked into their design (as it is will all Musk companies).

Toyota, Honda, and Nissan had net incomes in 2018 of $2.4T, $1T, and $750B. Comparing Tesla to them is retarded. Tesla has never had a year with any net income, and they never will.


Yes, the global business cycle is turning down. The auto sector will see some of the biggest swings. It will be bad for every auto related company. If a company was making a trillion fucking dollars a year before, they wont make as much. If a company was already losing money, they are BK.

21
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: August 04, 2019, 09:21:05 AM »
This insolation graph gets posted from time to time, but I think it is missing a cruicial component for best understanding. So I added it. At approx 350, the insolation/radiation balance seems to be achieved.

As we enter the final month of melt, we can see that pretty much all the sun energy excess is in the past, and now a good stirring is what the melt doctor should write a prescription for.

(Once the ESS finishes melting out in a week or two, conditions for cyclone creation will be as ideal as possible in the Arctic.)

Do you have a paper that you can quote to back this figure up?

Nah. It is just common sense. For several reasons. Everywhere in the world that isn't coastal starts to freeze under 350 and starts to melt above 350. Also, earth receives an average of about 350 wm2 overall, so it is basic logic that if earth isn't changing temperature, there is an equilibrium near 350.

If you print this out, it will be paper. Then you can use this to back up the figure. Good luck.

22
Policy and solutions / Re: Space colonization
« on: August 03, 2019, 03:40:59 PM »
... many people today fail to appreciate how difficult it’ll be to sustain colonies on the Red Planet.

We have sustained a small “colony” on the International Space Station for 20 years.

I don't think you understand what a colony is. You need relationships with the ecosystem around you to have a colony. No ecosystem, no colony.

In todays world of detached nonsense, it is easy to forget the biological basis of life.

23
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: August 03, 2019, 03:24:02 PM »
This insolation graph gets posted from time to time, but I think it is missing a cruicial component for best understanding. So I added it. At approx 350, the insolation/radiation balance seems to be achieved.

As we enter the final month of melt, we can see that pretty much all the sun energy excess is in the past, and now a good stirring is what the melt doctor should write a prescription for.

(Once the ESS finishes melting out in a week or two, conditions for cyclone creation will be as ideal as possible in the Arctic.)

24
Policy and solutions / Re: Why people don't listen to experts
« on: July 30, 2019, 05:20:00 PM »
Centralized power determines expert status. Centralized power should be viewed with significant skepticism. Experts act as the mouth pieces for centralized power and should not be carte blanche listened to and believed. It can be hard to see in todays world cuz the forest isn't always visible through the trees. But history shows what I am saying very clearly.

25
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: July 30, 2019, 02:22:21 AM »
ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, ICE ISLAND, baby!

26
Consequences / Re: Prepping for Collapse
« on: July 16, 2019, 02:49:15 AM »
If this prepping thread were real (and not just for daydreaming and amusement) then you would be talking about the best ways to grow food low-tech, the best edible mushrooms, how to bake bread from acorn (like Bruce Steele), the best ways to get clean water, hunting with bows, discussing whether goats or sheep make more sense around a farm, the most resistant fruit-trees that can be grown without spraying, mudbrick-techniques, etc. I think if the proverbial SHTF most of you won't last a week. Sorry. Time to get real.

Well I actually WAY undercut growing food, and started with WATER. But hey, if you think mushrooms are more important than WATER, then this thread probably isn't for you.

Ya, most people will die really quickly in 1st world countries if there is a sudden collapse. How does that make anything being said invalid? You just want to poo poo on any discussion of this sort.

27
Consequences / Re: Prepping for Collapse
« on: July 14, 2019, 04:08:39 AM »
Rich, I'll try to avoid insults, but it will be difficult. You couldn't be more wrong about your plan. Where to begin?

-The idea that a few hundred million people are required to live a non-primitive life is ridiculous.

-The idea that a few hundred million people are going to move to Saskatchewan in the next decade or two and set up a non-primitive life is absurd.

-Saskatchewan is probably the 2nd worst region in the world (behind central asia) in terms of the amount of climate change likely to occur in the coming decades. (And it is literally the opposite of Patagonia in almost every aspect.)

-(Although totally irrelevant,) the amount of land needed to support a few hundred million people is not large. Patagonia is 7 times larger than Bangladesh, population 170 million. Patagonia is also larger than Saskatchewan. Granted most of Patagonia won't be habitable, but NONE of Saskatchewan will be.

If you are too uppity to live a primitive life, you are pathetic and deserve what you will most certainly get, which is death. You seem a decent fellow, but try to keep an open mind that you may (again) be very wrong about something, before you start throwing ideas around as facts. Cheers.

28
Consequences / Re: Prepping for Collapse
« on: July 14, 2019, 01:15:10 AM »
Patagonia would have a good climate, but the scale of suitable climate in the Southern Hemisphere would be much smaller and allow for something much more primitive than the N. Hemisphere.

Be honest with yourself. You don't want to try Patagonia cuz it is far away and different. The entire North Hemi ecology will upended. Most of it will burn. Enjoy the dried beans.

29
Consequences / Re: Prepping for Collapse
« on: July 14, 2019, 01:12:16 AM »
By the way, the first flights of the huge rocket are nearing for the creation of a Martian colony.

Oh ya, the rocket that blew over in a 40mph wind. I'm sure that thing will take us to Mars. The tortoise beats the hare after-all. 39mph all the way to Mars baby!!!

30
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: July 14, 2019, 12:01:11 AM »
Then 2022 another record of ZERO at min. Basic math. Totally made up, but I like it.

31
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: July 13, 2019, 11:01:40 PM »
The heat has to travel much farther and faster (away from shore) than it has previously in order to maintain the melting. momentum. Otherwise, we're looking at a relatively inert body of warm water.

It really couldn't be much closer. (maybe I drew the area a little too far west, since it is overlapping with some ice. but that kinda proves the point.)

32
Policy and solutions / Re: Low GHG Meat
« on: July 13, 2019, 09:17:52 PM »
It really is dumb. Trying to make cows that don't burp as much methane! Seriously?

Next up: trees with less flammable leaves to prevent forest fires.

33
Consequences / Re: Prepping for Collapse
« on: July 13, 2019, 04:14:21 AM »
If society truly collapsed, all the nuclear reactors would meltdown and the Northern Hemisphere would be uninhabitable within weeks, and the Southern Hemisphere would probably follow within a few months. So you would probably just be dead.

Chernobyl melted down and 20 km away, things never become uninhabitable. Japan got nuked twice and had a recent meltdown and the island densely populated. The world is large, so even 400 meltdowns down destroy all life.

34
Policy and solutions / Re: Low GHG Meat
« on: July 13, 2019, 02:05:01 AM »
Here's an interesting article on selectively breeding cows with lower levels of methane-producing bacteria in their digestive tracts.

All that is needed is to bury their shit while it is fresh. This creates soil.

There are more ppl without a job in the US than there are cows. Easy fix. Robust solution.

Grass turns CO2 into plant matter. Cow turn plant matter into beef, heat, and shit. Shit (if buried) turns into soil.

The high tech stuff is just dumb.

35
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: July 13, 2019, 01:49:21 AM »
Predicting the weather 2 weeks out. Cool.

Where you see a prediction, there is none.

I think the weather would have to return to not only ridging but a dipole anomaly by no later than July 25th to have a shot at the record.

It just doesn't look like that is happening.

I'm curious how many weeks ahead of time was the GAC of 2012 being discussed.  Can any long time observers help me out?

I have no desire to get into petty arguments (at least on this thread), but I think it is important to recognize that just because there is no evidence of something happening 10+ days away, that doesn't really point to anything.

36
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: July 09, 2019, 05:33:26 AM »
Winning!

37
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: June 21, 2019, 02:25:55 PM »
Happy Peak Insolation Day 2019. May the highs be high, the lows be low, and the melting be ever in your favor!

38
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: June 12, 2019, 03:22:47 AM »
Wipneus describes Fram volume export as near normal for the month based on piomas data.

In volume yes. But the ice around greenland is much thinner than in years past, thus more area exports due to the ice structure's fragility, and the volume ends up about the same.

39
Policy and solutions / Re: Tesla glory/failure
« on: May 30, 2019, 03:10:49 AM »
Screw civility! The adults are gone. Let's tear this thing up!!!


40
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: May 22, 2019, 04:05:53 AM »
ALL HAIL A-TEAM. LONG MAY HE REIGN.

41
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: May 21, 2019, 04:06:32 PM »
Taking the Pacific side as a whole 2019 currently leads the pack. Compare and contrast with the Atlantic side:

Which is exactly what one would expect once the arctic lost all of its older ice and thus its rigidity. The ice is more free than ever to drift into the atlantic. I think this will get more severe in the coming years until there isn't enough ice left to make its southern journey.

42
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: May 20, 2019, 03:30:42 AM »
OK, so the snow is melting. This happens at this time of year.
Yeah, and the same happens with sea ice, and with the frost in my freezer if I unplug it.
Dumbest thing I read, your entire comment.

 Should we then close the thread and talk about football? Come on, ice is gonna melt, more or less who knows, who cares, hey its freaking normal in summer!!

How snow melts out in May and June, on continents and on ice, is relevant to what’s gonna happen to ice, be it causality or correlation, and I pay good attention to it.

Calma there buddy! I think you are reading Gerontocrat's comment with some weird lenses on.

If everyone could kindly STFU. The Arctic Sea Ice Melting Season 2019 is actually really interesting. Off-topic or irrelevant comments and gripes can be quite easily ignored.


There are currently some fires in northern alberta and maybe the northwestern territories. The smoke is headed towards the caa currently, although it is difficult to tell where it will go in the coming days. If it does end up settling on ice or thick snow, it could really supercharge melt.

A huge amount of open water has opened up in the northern part of baffin. HUGE. Thus the ice that is there is much further south than normal, which pretty much guarantees that baffin melt will stay considerably ahead of schedule.

Most interestingly, the heatwave in the Mackenzie river basin is INTENSE. Starting tomorrow temps are supposed to reach 15C, and then things really start to heat up for the next few days. The permafrost in the area could have a really really bad year.

43
The rest / Re: Climate change activists should not fly
« on: April 20, 2019, 05:26:24 AM »
EVERYONE IS MISSING THE POINT.

It is not about which mode of transportation is the most or least efficient....PEOPLE DO NOT NEED TO TRAVEL LONG DISTANCES. It is a totally frivolous activity to travel thousands of miles.

Planes are the most common mode of transportation for long distance travel. Other modes may be a little better or a little worse. What matters is that it is all unnecessary and does not actual add to quality of life. As easy of travel increases, the difference in places inherently decrease.

The only way anything changes (outside of total societal collapse [which is unfortunately very likely]) is with a proper pricing of polluting.

44
Consequences / Re: World of 2030
« on: April 15, 2019, 06:28:43 PM »
Assuming BAU:

blah blah blah

Assuming Not BAU:

la la blah


I really don't understand how people think that anything we do today is going to change the outcome of things in the next decade!  In terms of preparedness, that may be true (so fair point), BUT emissions in the next decade will have no significant effect on the climate in the next decade.


45
Policy and solutions / Re: Tesla glory/failure
« on: April 15, 2019, 03:05:06 AM »
Elon went a twitter bender today...accusing the WSJ of shilling for big oil, doubling down of 500k annually, double down on giving the finger to the SEC, claim that super AI is about to super rule, etc.

My interpretation is the suicide by cop theory. He is trying to have the SEC or DOJ or BoD push him out. He likely doesn't want to be at the helm when Tesla becomes the first trillion dollar auto company. He is self-less and is trying to save the world. There is no room for running a successful business.

Musk 2020

46
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2019 melting season
« on: April 02, 2019, 02:12:56 AM »
Trying to short-term predict a complex chaotic system like the Arctic is a mugs game.

I propose to rename ASIF "Mugs Musings".

47
Policy and solutions / Re: Tesla glory/failure
« on: February 04, 2019, 06:54:11 PM »
... I am not against innovation that aids the ability for humans to live nice yet green lives...I just happen to not think that Tesla doesn't fit the bill or is honest about what they are doing.)

So, to your mind, what company does fit the bill?  Who, or which one, has done more than Tesla to “honestly” wean individuals, companies, utilities, even whole islands, off of fossil fuels?

Beyond Meat, Impossible Foods, Giant Manufacturing, Hero Cycles, Mesta Board, World Centric, Tipa. Any company involved with permaculture or carbon negative farming or earthen construction.

CARS ARE NOT GREEN. Period.

48
Policy and solutions / Re: Tesla glory/failure
« on: January 31, 2019, 06:07:25 PM »
Tesla's capex is only 65% of depreciation. In layman's terms: their investing for future growth is less than their current wear and tear of their current equipment. So...the are spending enough to shrink in the future, not grow.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/tesla-champagne-dreams-on-a-six-pack-budget-11548936001

Also fun: Musk plans to slowly ramp weekly model 3 production this year from 5k to 7k...for a annual total of 350k to 500k. That is correct, they will be manufacturing cars somewhere between 55 and 85 weeks this year. Very disruptive. I can't believe Ford hasn't thought of this.

49
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« on: October 22, 2018, 01:13:37 AM »
For all of us seeking a safe place for the collapse or extreme storms...

This is pretty obvious IMO. The northern hemisphere will undergo extreme changes in climate. Every ecosystem will be ****ed.  Mad Max dust storm terribleness most places. The southern hemisphere should be more resilient but it will probably be too hot most places (meaning too much of a deviation from normal for the ecosystem to adapt). Thus being near an ocean will be good cuz oceans won't be able to heat up very easily. Also, being close to Antarctica's ice is another stabilizer. There really is only one place on earth that fits the description: Patagonia. See you there.


50
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« on: October 21, 2018, 09:14:50 PM »
DMI N 80 average temp hasn't dropped below -8C for about a month and a half longer than normal, which is a record. Next year the only thickish safeish ice will be just north of CAA. Greenland looks set to be the northern hemisphere's center of cold within a decade. Weird weird weather is coming.

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