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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #50 on: February 05, 2016, 09:40:17 PM »
Those Days You Work From Home May End Up Wrecking the Planet

- Higher energy use seen from those who work outside the office
- Only those living far from office help lower pollution
More businesses than ever are asking employees to work remotely in a bid to cut rental costs for office space and take advantage of the growth of super-fast broadband, teleconferencing and smart phones.

But working from your kitchen can actually increase the carbon dioxide emissions that cause global warming, since those who stay home usually turn up the thermostat. Home energy consumption increases 20 percent when people work where they live, according to a study by BT Group Plc, the U.K.’s biggest broadband provider.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-02-05/those-days-you-work-from-home-may-end-up-wrecking-the-planet
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #51 on: February 22, 2016, 06:02:32 PM »
Think of the energy wasted manufacturing, packaging, and transporting them, too.

Hamburg just became the first city to ban coffee pods
http://www.globalpost.com/article/6736075/2016/02/21/hamburg-just-became-first-city-ban-coffee-pods
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #52 on: February 29, 2016, 01:53:53 AM »
EU's ban on inefficient toasters delayed to avoid pro-Brexit press attack
Measures to save 10m tonnes of CO2 emissions per year have been delayed amid concerns highlighted by ‘toastergate’
The EU has put plans to regulate inefficient kettles and toasters into cold storage amid fears in Brussels that they could galvanise support for the leave campaign in the UK’s 23 June referendum.

Mobile phones, lifts, hair- and hand-dryers and vending machines are also on a shortlist of products for increased regulation in 2015-17. The measures had been expected to save the equivalent of 10m tonnes of CO2 emissions per year by 2030, helping EU countries to meet efficiency goals and consumers to cut their energy bills.

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/feb/28/eu-inefficient-toasters-ban-delayed-avoid-pro-brexit-press-attack
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #53 on: March 15, 2016, 07:32:56 PM »
U.S. Electricity Sales Dropped In 2015 For Fifth Time In 8 Years
In the past year, total U.S. electricity sales fell a remarkable 1.1 percent. The U.S. Energy Information Administration reports that this is the fifth drop in the past eight years.

Electricity demand growth has been flat for a decade while GDP is up nearly 15 percent. While weather plays a role in whether demand goes up or down in a given year, state and federal energy efficiency policies deserve a lot of credit for the long-term flattening of demand....
...
EIA, however, has the most accurate and comprehensive data on U.S. electricity supply and demand. And this decoupling certainly deserves further examination since it is an unprecedented achievement in modern U.S. history, appears likely to continue, and has broad implications for energy and climate policy. For instance, this decoupling is a key reason we’ve been able to cut total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in the past decade, since flat electricity demand meant that the explosive growth in renewables and natural gas power squeezed out dirty coal.

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/03/15/3759755/electricity-sales-dropped/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #54 on: April 10, 2016, 05:14:55 PM »
Powering your water heater during the day, when renewable electricity supply is at its greatest, can help avoid expensive peaker plant operation.

Typically, when energy demand peaks, utilities turn to peaker power plants. These plants supply the most expensive electricity. Water heaters supplant peaker plants by reducing demand during peak hours, leveling out the gaps between supply and demand that would otherwise be filled by a gas-fired power plant. What’s more, cutting-edge grid interactive water heaters are able to respond to minute fluctuations in supply, making them more efficient than peaker plants.

http://www.popsci.com/need-high-power-home-battery-use-your-water-heater
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TerryM

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #55 on: April 10, 2016, 06:52:59 PM »
Sig
Wasting electricity to heat water when inexpensive, (homemade?) solar water heating solutions are available seems to me to be a no-brainer.
I'd assume that if panel size was a consideration, solar heating would be far more efficient at any latitude over photovoltaic + immersion heater, or even the much higher tech photovoltaic + heat pump option. Cost of installation & maintenance would again favor solar heating.
I don't understand why anyone would prefer the more expensive, less efficient, photovoltaic solution.
Terry

ghoti

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #56 on: April 10, 2016, 10:10:23 PM »
I have both PV and solar domestic hot water. The PV may actually be cheaper at this point and certainly mechanically much simpler. I still wouldn't use PV to heat hot water but I can imagine situations where it might make sense.

If you have an excess of PV generated electricity and don't have the opportunity to sell that surplus electricity then you'd want to store the energy for use later. Storing energy as heat is currently cheaper than storing it in batteries. Won't always be so in the future but at this point batteries and controllers are expensive.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #57 on: April 10, 2016, 11:40:27 PM »
Sig
Wasting electricity to heat water when inexpensive, (homemade?) solar water heating solutions are available seems to me to be a no-brainer.
I'd assume that if panel size was a consideration, solar heating would be far more efficient at any latitude over photovoltaic + immersion heater, or even the much higher tech photovoltaic + heat pump option. Cost of installation & maintenance would again favor solar heating.
I don't understand why anyone would prefer the more expensive, less efficient, photovoltaic solution.
Terry

Terry,
I don't disagree.  But many housing arrangements (rental, homeowners associations, apartments, city dwellings) would likely not have the option of adding solar hardware.  Not today, anyway.  Maybe soon.  In the meantime, time-of-use is a way to make more efficient what you do have.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #58 on: April 12, 2016, 02:54:09 AM »
Hempstead, NY:

SANTINO’S BRIGHT IDEA TO SAVE TAXPAYERS $43 MILLION
Energy cost savings that have been realized during the initial phase of L.E.D. streetlight installation have been dramatic and impressive. In specific, the most recent one month period of streetlight costs totaled $248,000 in February 2016 contrasted with $409,000 during the same period in 2015. The reduction constitutes a 48% reduction in street lighting costs. Officials call that reduction amazing, especially considering the fact that less than 50% of the total 50,000 streetlights were converted to L.E.D. in January.

http://www.empirestatenews.net/2016/04/11/santinos-bright-idea-to-save-taxpayers-43-million/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #59 on: July 25, 2016, 03:19:39 PM »
Global Economy Becoming Less Energy Intense
... The International Energy Agency announced last year that global greenhouse gas emissions produced by burning fossil fuels were the same in 2014 as they were in 2013 despite a growing global economy. The trend continued in 2015 as emissions remained flat even as the world’s economy grew 3 percent.

The reason: More electricity was produced from renewables and natural gas than ever before, and energy is being used more efficiently.

“At a global level, the decline in energy intensity is driven by a variety of factors, ranging from structural changes in economies from more intensive to less, efficiency gains such as fuel efficiency standards, to consumer behaviors — using energy differently,” EIA analyst Ari Kahan said.

More efficient buildings, vehicle engines and power plants are reducing how much energy is consumed per person globally, according to an International Energy Agency report. Efficiency alone reduced energy consumption 18 percent between 1990 and 2014 in the U.S., the United Kingdom, Australia, Japan and seven Western European countries.

Globally, the Energy Information Administration expects both the energy and carbon intensity of the global economy to gradually decline over the next 25 years.

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/global-economy-using-energy-more-efficiently-20542
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TerryM

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #60 on: July 25, 2016, 09:13:34 PM »
If we emitted the same volume of greenhouse gasses in 2013,14 & 15, how is it possible that the Mona Loa numbers are increasing at record rates?


Is the IEA attributing all of this addition to natural sources?


Does this indicate that we've reached a runaway situation already, or is El Nino to blame & next years numbers will head down?


Terry


Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #61 on: July 25, 2016, 10:14:59 PM »
If we emitted the same volume of greenhouse gasses in 2013,14 & 15, how is it possible that the Mona Loa numbers are increasing at record rates?


Is the IEA attributing all of this addition to natural sources?


Does this indicate that we've reached a runaway situation already, or is El Nino to blame & next years numbers will head down?


Terry

My guess would be that the IEA numbers refer to "its 29 member countries."  Thus, other countries are likely increasing their emissions.
https://www.iea.org/aboutus/
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Sleepy

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #62 on: July 26, 2016, 05:17:23 AM »
If we emitted the same volume of greenhouse gasses in 2013,14 & 15, how is it possible that the Mona Loa numbers are increasing at record rates?

Is the IEA attributing all of this addition to natural sources?

Does this indicate that we've reached a runaway situation already, or is El Nino to blame & next years numbers will head down?

Terry

The recent El Nino has most likely just taken warming another step up.
I'd rather use the attached graph from the Global Carbon Budget 2015: http://www.earth-syst-sci-data.net/7/349/2015/essd-7-349-2015.pdf and a quote from Le Quéré:
http://www.tyndall.ac.uk/sites/default/files/carbon_budget_press_release.pdf
With two years of untypical emissions growth, it looks like the trajectory of global emissions might have changed temporarily. It is unlikely that emissions have peaked for good. This is because energy needs for growing economies still rely primarily on coal, and emissions decreases in some industrial countries are still modest at best.
Global emissions need to decrease to near zero to achieve climate stabilisation. We are still emitting massive amounts of CO2 annually – around 36 billion tonnes from fossil fuels and industry alone. There is a long way to near zero emissions.

I think Le Quéré will be more correct than IEA.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #63 on: August 02, 2016, 06:24:25 PM »
The "Refrigeration Battery" stores coolness –– not electrons –– during off-peak hours by freezing a tank of salt water, and deploys it during on-peak hours.

An industry first, the Refrigeration Battery makes it possible for supermarkets, cold-storage facilities, and food processors to intelligently store and deploy refrigeration. The battery plugs into your refrigeration system, just like a display case. It stores thermal energy produced by your refrigeration system during off-peak hours, and deploys it during on-peak hours. As a result, electricity demand is reduced by up to 40 percent during peak hours—a significant cost savings.

http://www.axiomexergy.com
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Sleepy

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #64 on: August 03, 2016, 06:44:01 AM »
Thermal storage tanks are nothing new. I have a slighty larger, and rather old, dream that I've never realized. :(

Heating during winter is the main problem in Scandinavia, even if winters are becoming warmer and warmer. So; bury a large sturdy tank that withstands freezing, feed it with solar hot water panels, then use a heat pump to warm the house. By doing so, I can use the panels more efficently at really low temperatures and also be able to utilize the phase changing properties of water. A heat pump filled with propane or propylene will be efficient in harnessing heat from zero degrees.

But with the winters lately I will do just fine with the three homebuilt and interconnected air to air/water systems I use now. The oldest of them is thirteen years old and it runs every day, all year around.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #65 on: August 20, 2016, 03:08:40 PM »
Vancouver Leapfrogs Energy Efficiency, Adopts Zero-Emissions Building Plan
The city of Vancouver, Canada sent a message to the green building sector this summer: Efficient isn’t good enough.

The dense coastal city will require zero emissions from any new buildings by 2030, based on a policy approved July 13. That means the building sector will have to roll up its collective sleeves and figure out how to heat, cool and power every new construction without any net greenhouse gas emissions. If that sounds daunting, the authors of the policy agree.

“This is a plan to fundamentally shift building practice in Vancouver in just under 10 years,” the document states.

The city government is leading by example here: all new city-owned and Vancouver Affordable Housing Agency projects must meet that high standard starting now. That’s key for testing out the building techniques that will later be codified into the building standards, said Sean Pander, the head of the city’s green buildings program. The next phase will require all rezoned residential developments to comply by 2025, with other new buildings following suit by 2030.

http://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/vancouver-leapfrogs-energy-efficiency-adopts-zero-emissions-building-plan
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #66 on: October 03, 2016, 04:45:56 PM »
Which U.S. States are the Most Energy-Efficient? A “Dramatic Photo Finish,” and a Tie for Top Honors
The just-released 2016 energy efficiency scorecard from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) is the latest in ACEEE’s annual assessments of state commitments to, and progress on, energy efficiency, their “annual benchmark of the progress of state energy efficiency policies and programs.”

http://blog.ucsusa.org/john-rogers/which-states-are-the-most-energy-efficient-2016
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theoldinsane

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #67 on: October 03, 2016, 08:10:55 PM »
Thermal storage tanks are nothing new. I have a slighty larger, and rather old, dream that I've never realized. :(

Heating during winter is the main problem in Scandinavia, even if winters are becoming warmer and warmer. So; bury a large sturdy tank that withstands freezing, feed it with solar hot water panels, then use a heat pump to warm the house. By doing so, I can use the panels more efficently at really low temperatures and also be able to utilize the phase changing properties of water. A heat pump filled with propane or propylene will be efficient in harnessing heat from zero degrees.

But with the winters lately I will do just fine with the three homebuilt and interconnected air to air/water systems I use now. The oldest of them is thirteen years old and it runs every day, all year around.


Great.

Geoenergy is a big thing in Sweden. Almost necessary to achieve the demands in coming building regulations. And is within my profession. My biggest plant as an engineer is 120 boreholes so far. Exciting.

http://geotec.se/geoenergi/vad-ar-bergvarme-och-geoenergi/


sidd

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #68 on: October 04, 2016, 05:05:58 AM »
Please is there a english translation of the link

http://geotec.se/geoenergi/vad-ar-bergvarme-och-geoenergi/

I have seen a lrge one go in in the midwest, and i wonder if these large projects are doing the seasonal thermal storage thing as in

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_Landing_Solar_Community

Seasonal storage would be a huge win, eliminate a large chunk of HVAC load

sidd

budmantis

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #69 on: October 04, 2016, 07:39:09 AM »
Which U.S. States are the Most Energy-Efficient? A “Dramatic Photo Finish,” and a Tie for Top Honors
The just-released 2016 energy efficiency scorecard from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) is the latest in ACEEE’s annual assessments of state commitments to, and progress on, energy efficiency, their “annual benchmark of the progress of state energy efficiency policies and programs.”

http://blog.ucsusa.org/john-rogers/which-states-are-the-most-energy-efficient-2016


For the most part, states that lean Democrat are ranked higher than states that lean Republican.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2016, 08:43:31 AM by budmantis »

P-maker

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #70 on: October 04, 2016, 09:36:59 AM »
Sidd,

if you are looking for up-to-date material in English on this issue, please try this site:

http://solar-district-heating.eu/NewsEvents/SDHConference2016.aspx

You will find plenty of presentations linking solar energy and seasonal storage.

Sleepy

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #71 on: October 04, 2016, 09:41:19 AM »
Please is there a english translation of the link

http://geotec.se/geoenergi/vad-ar-bergvarme-och-geoenergi/

I have seen a lrge one go in in the midwest, and i wonder if these large projects are doing the seasonal thermal storage thing as in

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_Landing_Solar_Community

Seasonal storage would be a huge win, eliminate a large chunk of HVAC load

sidd

It's more or less the same principle but not DIY as my old shelved project. They use one or several closely spaced drill holes for seasonal storage in the bedrock. From the link within your link it's called BTES (borehole thermal energy storage).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seasonal_thermal_energy_storage

sidd

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #72 on: October 04, 2016, 08:58:56 PM »
Thanks for the link to the conference.

Sleepy

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #73 on: October 05, 2016, 05:52:29 AM »
A familiar experience among us Swedes visiting Billund is (apart that it's very flat) that while you can use Swedish, you might have difficulties understanding the answers given by the Danes. :)

Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #74 on: October 06, 2016, 06:57:24 PM »
What If the Neighbors Are Watching?
How peer pressure can be used to lower energy bills
By now, most of you likely are receiving those energy efficiency reports in the mail from your local utility company — the ones with the colorful bar graphs that show you how your energy use stacks up against your neighbors. This isn’t an idle “FYI’’ exercise, but a carefully designed strategy aimed at encouraging you to cut back on the power.

The approach is grounded in social science research, based on the belief that if you find out your neighbors are doing the right thing, you will want to do the right thing too. “This isn’t about pushing or prodding people into a choice, but informing them about a choice,’’ said Robert Cialdini, professor emeritus of psychology and marketing at Arizona State University.

“Simply learning what people around you have chosen to do about their energy consumption informs you about what is appropriate, and influences you to do the same,’’ he adds.
...
What’s in it for the utility companies? Initially, you might think they would want consumers to use more energy in order to increase profits. But there are more powerful incentives at work for them, making them eager to get on board.

Most utilities are either required to reduce energy consumption by a certain amount every year, and are compensated by the public utility commission for doing so, or they are interested because they are looking for ways to avoid building new power plants, which can be very expensive. Also, they are trying to reduce peak demand when there are spikes in energy use, often between 3 and 6 p.m.

While social norms may be the major force, competition likely also influences consumer behavior. I know when my reports come — and mine consistently say “good’’ — I’m nevertheless frustrated over the fact that they don’t say “great,’’ and that some of my neighbors are doing better than me. This goads me into trying harder.
https://nexusmedianews.com/what-if-the-neighbors-are-watching-48fc88b0b402
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #75 on: October 11, 2016, 04:21:30 AM »
Oil Glut Isn’t Holding Back Energy Efficiency Gains, IEA Says
Energy  intensity, which measures the amount of fuel consumed per unit of gross domestic product, fell 1.8 percent last year, triple the average rate over the past decade and more than the 1.5 percent reduction in 2014, the Paris-based IEA said Monday. Investment in efficiency measures totaled $221 billion last year, about 66 percent more than was spent on building conventional power generation.

The findings will help nations meet their ambitions of reducing greenhouse gases while limiting energy costs and spreading electricity to more of the poorest communities. The IEA has been prodding governments to put efficiency at the heart of their energy policies, saying it’s often the cheapest way to achieve them.
...
The efficiency gains came in spite of cheaper fossil fuels. The price of crude oil has dropped about 55 percent since its peak in 2014. An emerging glut of gas is leading to significant drops in cost, with tankers of the commodity in its liquid form seeking buyers.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-10/world-squeezing-more-from-energy-it-uses-despite-oil-supply-glut
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #76 on: January 29, 2017, 05:21:59 PM »
Art Rosenfeld, California’s Godfather of Energy Efficiency, Dies at 90
Art Rosenfeld, a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) Distinguished Scientist Emeritus who is also known as California’s “godfather” of energy efficiency and who has been credited with being personally responsible for billions of dollars in energy savings, died Friday at his home in Berkeley, California. He was 90.
http://newscenter.lbl.gov/2017/01/27/art-rosenfeld-californias-godfather-energy-efficiency-90/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #77 on: May 19, 2017, 09:10:43 PM »
"Demand-Response" improvement is a type of efficiency, right?  ;)

Australian Energy Market Operator looks at smarter ways to deal with extreme peaks and heatwaves
...
In the PJM market, one of the biggest in the US, demand response accounts for 10 per cent of total capacity, and Zibelman sees no reason why it cannot grow to be at least 30 per cent of the Australian market.

That’s because Australia has a ready-made investment in the technologies that are needed. More than 1.6 million homes and businesses have installed rooftop solar, and many of these will install battery storage as well.

“If you have solar on your roof and you are putting in storage, it is saying that during certain hours of the day you use solar to charge up the battery, and then, rather than relying on grid, you reduce demand on the grid. For us (the grid operator) that’s the same as increasing generation.”

Zibelman says it is an obvious solution to provide a price signal to use these resources, as well as rewarding others – such as manufacturers and large businesses – for cutting back on their power usage at critical moments, rather than spending more money on new plant.

“If we can reduce the amount of demand, that has the same benefit as the grid, and is a lot less expensive than building a new power plant that is only used for a few hours a year,” she says....
http://reneweconomy.com.au/aemo-looks-at-smarter-ways-to-deal-with-extreme-peaks-and-heatwaves-40094/
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Shared Humanity

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #78 on: May 28, 2017, 04:38:17 PM »
Energy efficiency (reduction in consumption by any means possible) is simply the most powerful tool that people have to wage war with the fossil fuel industry. There is no effective method for the industry to fight back.


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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #79 on: May 29, 2017, 01:07:30 AM »
The industry does fight back, as with the successful fight by the US car industry against the Obama-administration car fuel efficiency standards which would have seen a huge change in the US car fleet (and a big support for the push to EV's).

Best thing would be if we had a government mandate to increase energy efficiency by 3% a year (3 times the current rate in the richer countries) with the supporting regulations and policies. Add in an aggressive move to decarbonize energy supply and 5% a year reductions in emissions is possible. Would require an activist government agenda though, not something that seems to be very acceptable.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #80 on: May 29, 2017, 04:51:32 AM »
The industry does fight back, as with the successful fight by the US car industry against the Obama-administration car fuel efficiency standards which would have seen a huge change in the US car fleet (and a big support for the push to EV's).

Best thing would be if we had a government mandate to increase energy efficiency by 3% a year (3 times the current rate in the richer countries) with the supporting regulations and policies. Add in an aggressive move to decarbonize energy supply and 5% a year reductions in emissions is possible. Would require an activist government agenda though, not something that seems to be very acceptable.

I missed out on how the car industry eliminated the efficiency regs they negotiated with President Obama.  When did that happen?

rboyd

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #81 on: May 29, 2017, 06:33:27 AM »
Big win for automakers as Trump orders fuel economy standards review

"President Donald Trump on Wednesday ordered a review of tough U.S. vehicle fuel-efficiency standards put in place by the Obama administration, handing a victory to auto industry executives and provoking criticism from Democrats and environmental groups.

In a move widely seen as a preamble to loosening fuel standards, Trump told an audience of cheering union workers, he would "ensure that any regulations we have protect and defend your jobs, your factories," and promised he would encourage growth in the U.S. auto sector."

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-autos-idUSKBN16M2C5


Bob Wallace

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #82 on: May 29, 2017, 06:43:53 AM »
Trump has ordered all sorts of 'reviews'.   So far none have gone anywhere. 

The efficiency of the vehicles sold over the next few years is dialed in.  All that may happen is a higher percentage of large vehicles.  Even they will be more efficient because that R&D has already been finished.

Oil is done.  It doesn't matter very much what fuel efficiencies will look like in five years. 

rboyd

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #83 on: May 29, 2017, 06:17:32 PM »
I admire your optimism Bob, I wish I could share it. I am certainly not a "societal collapse doomer" but see a very rough few decades ahead. The corporate executive are tasked with protecting their profits, and they will use every dirty trick in the book to do so. Including using helpful politicians as much as possible. They will stretch out the fossil fuel death process.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #84 on: May 29, 2017, 09:18:43 PM »
I admire your optimism Bob, I wish I could share it. I am certainly not a "societal collapse doomer" but see a very rough few decades ahead. The corporate executive are tasked with protecting their profits, and they will use every dirty trick in the book to do so. Including using helpful politicians as much as possible. They will stretch out the fossil fuel death process.

Coal is dead. 

Natural gas is starting to be underpriced by renewables. 

Tucson Electric Power (TEP) this week announced it would buy solar energy from a new 100MW solar plant at the historically low price of less than US3c/kWh – less than half of what it had agreed to pay in similar contracts over the last few years.

The project will also include 30MW/120MWh of battery storage, and the company says that the power purchase agreement for the combined output is “significantly less” than US4.5c/kWh – nearly two-thirds cheaper than the previous such contract struck in Hawaii, and well below the cost of a gas-fired peaking plant.

That's only gas peakers.  But wind/solar directly used are pricing in under CCNG.

Oil has no effective way that I can see to fight the move to electrified transportation.  In order to compete economically they'd need to be able to sell fuel for under $1/gallon and they can't do that.

Oil companies have no way to stop the development of batteries and electric vehicles.  This it totally out of their control and will roll on regardless of how they squeal.

Might Trump and his fellow Republicans mess stuff up a bit in the US?  Perhaps (but not likely).  If they did it would have no negative impact on the development of EVs in China, Japan, Germany and other countries.  Tesla would quickly build factories outside the US.  Ford, GM and Chrysler would start screaming like holy hell as they saw their companies being destroyed.

Horses are out of the barn and galloping over the horizon.  Too late for the US government to shut the world's barn doors.

rboyd

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #85 on: May 29, 2017, 10:10:24 PM »
Just need to get in an oil-fuelled helicopter and shoot the horses ... sorry, couldn't resist!

Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #86 on: June 15, 2017, 08:17:25 PM »
Massachusetts:  Reducing Peak Energy Use

Baker-Polito Administration Announces Over $4.6 Million in Grants for Peak Demand Reduction Projects
BOSTON – June 14, 2017 – The Baker-Polito Administration today announced the awarding of 9 grants totaling $4,690,561 to incentivize companies to demonstrate innovation in peak electricity and gas demand reduction. The grants, funded by the Department of Energy Resources (DOER), seek to demonstrate business models that include both geographically targeted reductions to avoid and delay electric transmission and distribution investments, and broader strategies in electricity and gas peak load reduction.

“Massachusetts is proud to be a national leader in energy efficiency programs that reduce overall consumption and we are committed to continuing our work to improve energy costs disproportionately affected by times of peak demand,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “The demonstration projects funded through these grants will strengthen our innovation economy and provide the Commonwealth with a roadmap for reducing our most expensive energy loads and securing our energy future.”

“Today’s grants will ensure that the Commonwealth remains at the forefront of energy innovation by utilizing emerging technologies to reduce peak energy usage,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “From residential customers to municipal governments, these grants have the potential to have a serious impact for Massachusetts’ innovation economy and ratepayers.”
...
http://www.mass.gov/eea/pr-2017/4-6-million-grants-for-peak-demand-reduction-projects.html

Electrek says about this:
[Massachusetts] has put money behind 9 grants aimed at reducing peak demand via, mostly, deploying energy storage intelligently. For instance – Tesla – $996,455 – Will demonstrate aggregated energy storage for peak demand reduction in National Grid territory. Tesla will work to quantify the benefits of the demonstrated peak demand reductions and evaluate the model’s viability at scale. – This reminds me of Tesla’s distributed grid work in Vermont. Look at the list of projects (it’s short). Within three to four years, Massachusetts will have the fundamental knowledge – funded and trusted by their taxpayers – to change move their energy grid well into the 21st century.
https://electrek.co/2017/06/15/egeb-smart-v2g-massachusetts-energy-storage-tesla-tsec-perc-el-paso/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #87 on: July 03, 2017, 09:56:48 PM »
Energy efficiency deserves center stage during president's Energy Week
Today the Trump Administration is launching an Energy Week to promote our nation’s “energy dominance” by increasing fossil fuel production. Notably absent in White House plans so far are discussions on how to increase energy efficiency, generally the cheapest way to meet our energy needs. Energy efficiency doesn’t just save us money, it supports millions of jobs. It should be included in a truly great Energy Week.

Energy efficiency is already big. Our recent research report, which evaluated only the electricity sector, estimates that efficiency measures since 1990 have made efficiency our third largest electricity resource, after natural gas and coal. (Broader analyses that go back to the 1970s have found that efficiency is already our nation’s largest energy resource). While this finding may seem strange to some—how can not using power be considered a resource—in reality, it’s simple. Utilities can meet rising electricity demand in two ways: by generating more power or by reducing demand. Utilities encourage customers to use efficient technologies to reduce their energy waste while providing the same level of service. Considered this way, energy efficiency is a resource similar to power plants, wind turbines, or solar panels.

In many areas of the country such as the Northwest, electric utility planners have been relying on energy efficiency for years to keep the lights on. These planners have learned to use efficiency because it’s reliable and generally cheaper than coal, natural gas, and renewables. Our investments in energy efficiency have paid off, saving customers money, reducing pollution, advancing cutting-edge technologies, and creating jobs. Without these investments since 1990, we would need the equivalent of 313 additional large power plants to meet current US energy needs. This is more than three times the coal electricity production in Germany or about two-thirds of the existing coal electricity in the United States. If we consider energy efficiency measures a segment of the US electricity resource “pie,” they would count for 18% of total generation in 2015. Here are graphics from our report: [see below]

In recent years, efficiency has rapidly grown as a resource, and it has the potential to increase much more. We already have experience implementing federal, state, and local policies that are proven to work. If the federal government and the states increase measures such as appliance and equipment standards and building codes, efficiency could become our nation’s largest electricity resource by 2030 and provide one-third of our total expected electricity needs.
...
http://aceee.org/blog/2017/06/energy-efficiency-deserves-center
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #88 on: July 21, 2017, 08:29:06 PM »
Aliso Canyon Should Close Permanently, Says California Governor Jerry Brown

A call to phase out Southern California’s biggest natural-gas storage site in 10 years, and bring in efficiency, solar PV, energy storage and demand response to take its place.
The threat drove the CPUC to fast-track utility deployments of DERs in record time, starting with Southern California Edison’s procurement of more than 70 megawatts of energy storage from Tesla, Greensmith Energy and AES Energy Storage. SCE has also turned to Nest to enable 50 megawatts of smart thermostat-enabled peak load reduction, tapping about 50,000 of its existing customers in the region with utility incentives and fine-tuned behavioral and automated demand response.

Southern California Gas is also working with Nest to deliver incentives to customers in return for some control over their thermostats -- not to reduce summer peak air conditioning usage, but to lower natural-gas heating bills. While this incentive-based program is measured in terms of overall efficiency, not peak capacity, it coincides with smaller but challenging regional winter peak in demand for electricity and gas.


These combined projects represent a little more than one-tenth of the generation capacity fed by Aliso Canyon’s reserves. Replacing Aliso Canyon’s capacity and reliability is no small task, and “not one that I take lightly or without thoughtful consideration,” Weisenmiller wrote.

“In the short term, we must continue to closely monitor energy reliability in Southern California through peak usage in the summer and winter. We must also work with all parties to pursue effective mitigation measures to meet the energy demands of residential and commercial customers.”
...
https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/aliso-canyon-should-close-permanently-says-california-gov.-jerry-brown
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #89 on: August 13, 2017, 03:27:27 AM »
Internet-connected Nest Thermostats can help reduce energy demand during the upcoming solar eclipse in the U.S.

...So, we’re encouraging people across the US to help offset this drop in energy production by pre-cooling their homes before the eclipse. If you don’t own a Nest thermostat, you can manually adjust the temperature by one or two degrees during the eclipse. If you own a Nest Thermostat that’s eligible to participate*, we’ve made it easy. Here’s what to expect:

Look for a special message on your eligible Nest Thermostat a couple days before the eclipse. It’s just one press to join in.
If you join, a few hours before the eclipse hits your area, your Nest Thermostat may automatically pre-cool your home so that you can save energy during the eclipse. After the eclipse, your thermostat will go back to its regular schedule.

Your Nest Thermostat won’t let your home get too warm. You’re always in control and can change the temperature at any time. ...
https://nest.com/blog/2017/08/10/solar-eclipse-meet-the-nest-thermostat/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #90 on: September 16, 2017, 03:34:11 PM »
Mayor de Blasio: New York City Will Be First City to Mandate that Existing Buildings Dramatically Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions
September 14, 2017
Mandates on NYC’s 14,500 least efficient buildings to accelerate and deepen major efficiency upgrades; most ambitious program of its kind in the nation; financing to support retrofits, steep penalties for non-compliance; will spur 17,000 ‘green jobs’

NEW YORK— Mayor Bill de Blasio today announced new mandates that will force building owners to make sharp reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The new rules will compel owners to meet fossil fuel caps – requiring deeper upgrades to boilers, water heaters, roofs and windows on an accelerated 2030 timeframe – with sharp penalties for failure to comply.

“Time is not on our side,” said Mayor de Blasio. “New York will continue to step up and make critical changes to help protect our city and prevent the worst effects of climate change. We must shed our buildings’ reliance on fossil fuels here and now. To do this, we are mandating upgrades to increase the energy efficiency of our buildings, helping us continue to honor the goals of the Paris Agreement. No matter what happens in Washington, we will not shirk our responsibility to act on climate in our own backyard.” ...
http://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/587-17/mayor-de-blasio-nyc-will-be-first-city-mandate-existing-buildings-dramatically-cut#/0
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Bob Wallace

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #91 on: September 16, 2017, 05:12:05 PM »
The new rules will compel owners to meet fossil fuel caps – requiring deeper upgrades to boilers, water heaters, roofs and windows on an accelerated 2030 timeframe – with sharp penalties for failure to comply.

This is excellent and it needs to expand across the country.  Make financing available for upgrades and pay back the costs with energy savings. 

Shared Humanity

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #92 on: September 19, 2017, 03:36:14 PM »
Energy efficiency along with renewables (solar, wind etc.) are the two most important approaches to reducing our carbon footprint while protecting and strengthening our economy.

7% of total electricity consumption in the U.S. is for lighting.

https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=99&t=3

LED's use 75% less electricity.

https://energy.gov/energysaver/led-lighting

We need a worldwide Marshall Plan to build the production capacity to replace all other forms of lighting with LED's.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #93 on: September 20, 2017, 09:49:54 AM »
I travel a fair amount and I'm just not seeing many incandescents that need replacing.

A lot of the world (SEA, for example) went fluorescent long ago and it looks like the transition to LEDs is happening naturally.

Cities and companies should switch over fairly fast.  Those that have are reporting large electricity savings and those sorts of operations tend to have people who look for ways to cut expenses.

etienne

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #94 on: September 20, 2017, 01:24:46 PM »
Those that have are reporting large electricity savings and those sorts of operations tend to have people who look for ways to cut expenses.

You're absolutely right. If you don't ask for the change, it comes when the old solution is not available anymore. I'm managing a new building, and I was very surprised that most light bulbs are halogen. Keys of the building have been handed out in July this year. I'll suggest to have them all replaced by LED, it will be an energy saving and a time saving action since LED last much longer. Some suppliers try to keep the incomes coming from changing lightbulbs.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #95 on: September 20, 2017, 07:15:19 PM »
. I'll suggest to have them all replaced by LED, it will be an energy saving and a time saving action since LED last much longer.

I'm "pushing" a new idea, the Invisible Hand That Fights Climate Change. 

We talk about how cost and government programs operate as drivers of the transition away from fossil fuels.  But I think there's another driver, individuals who are making little changes that all add up over time.

When I see the models of how much progress renewables will make over time I don't see the concerns and actions of individual included as one of the driving forces.  If this isn't included then the models are going to undershoot our actual progress.  People who cause their organizations, businesses and homes to become more efficient and use more green energy are a generally unrecognized force.

numerobis

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #96 on: September 20, 2017, 11:40:44 PM »
I just replaced almost all the light bulbs with LED in my new apartment.

I first pulled two 100W bulbs that were installed in 40W max fixtures (!) -- not counting two more that were burned out. All four were blackened on top.

Then I replaced a 60 W bulb. The previous tenants had put two 26 W CFL bulbs in a closet fixture. I'm not sure why they needed quite so much light in that closet, so I moved one.

So that's 260 W removed.

Then, flying home from a business trip, I brought two 6-packs of 2700 K, 800-lumen, 8.5 W bulbs from Phillips. They were $13 each six-pack. Also, while I was away my partner unpacked an old spare bulb I'd packed with some of our books: 3000 K, 800-lumen, 10.5 W. Just a couple years old, but even that small amount of time saw a 20% improvement in efficiency.

I found exactly 13 bulbs to replace. 8x 60W, 5x 40W, a total of 680 W.

So that's 940 W replaced by 112.5 W, my closet is slightly less bright, other rooms are equally bright, and my apartment slightly less likely to catch on fire.

Now the lights aren't always on. The usual estimate is that lights are on for 3h a day. So that's about 100W saved on average, year-round. Or about 3-4 cents per hour at the utility rate here.

I'm not sure what to do with all that money. ;)

Bob Wallace

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #97 on: September 21, 2017, 12:03:15 AM »
I'm not sure what to do with all that money. ;)

Buy yourself a gold star.

numerobis

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #98 on: September 21, 2017, 01:07:04 AM »
Or four more bulbs (I forgot the bathroom). And maybe a new bulb for the fridge too.

In the new apartment I hear the diesel generator that powers Iqaluit. Someday that constant drone will be gone.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #99 on: October 03, 2017, 10:03:49 PM »
U.S.:  Despite Trump, states keep getting more energy-efficient.
Around the country, utilities spent $7.6 billion to improve energy efficiency in 2016, the equivalent of shutting down five coal power plants in terms of emissions. Even as the EPA and Department of Energy work to defang energy-efficiency rules, states continue to follow the basic logic of paying less money for less pollution.
http://grist.org/briefly/despite-trump-states-keep-getting-more-energy-efficient/
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