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Author Topic: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”  (Read 26064 times)

Bob Wallace

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #100 on: October 04, 2017, 05:09:16 AM »
We need to keep pushing hard on the external costs of fossil fuels.

If more people understand that leaving fossil fuels will save us a lot of money the transition will be easier to pull off.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #101 on: October 11, 2017, 04:38:42 PM »
"The Honda Smart House in Davis, CA, may look like an average home, but it uses 75 percent less energy and three times less water than an average home. The home is connected to the grid, but it produces more energy than it uses, making it zero net energy (ZNE).
-
In addition to being ZNE, the home has with adaptive lighting, heating, and cooling that is naturally aided by insulation, south-facing windows, and reflective roofing material."
https://www.instagram.com/p/BaFWIM4H3rH/
Image below.

http://www.hondasmarthome.com

Video:
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

etienne

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #102 on: November 20, 2017, 09:45:15 PM »
Well talking about efficiency... if you had a doubt that energy is too cheap, just check this :
https://realfly.ch/en/

Bob Wallace

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #103 on: November 20, 2017, 10:09:04 PM »
Well talking about efficiency... if you had a doubt that energy is too cheap, just check this :
https://realfly.ch/en/

Skydiving on a column of air rather than jumping out of an airplane.  Saves plane fuel....

etienne

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #104 on: November 20, 2017, 10:28:07 PM »
I also like this part of the description :

RealFly is committed to the environment

Our team applies simple daily actions to preserve it.

★ All internal correspondence is by email.
★ Our premises are equipped with a LED timer system for off-peak hours.
★ All waste is carefully sorted and recycled.
★ Management and optimisation of our printers
(printing in draft mode and printers in standby mode).
★ Toner cartridges for our printers are sent to specialised
recycling companies.

Well, this kind of system is only possible because of the efficiency gains on electrical motors, heat pumps (air has to be cooled) ... and is some kind of electrical proof of concept of Jevons paradox.

numerobis

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #105 on: November 22, 2017, 02:58:40 PM »
https://www.indoorskydivingsource.com/articles/types-of-vertical-wind-tunnels/

1.6 MW for that system.

I'm failing to compare it to other entertainment like cinemas or concert halls.

ghoti

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #106 on: November 22, 2017, 05:21:37 PM »
https://www.indoorskydivingsource.com/articles/types-of-vertical-wind-tunnels/

1.6 MW for that system.

I'm failing to compare it to other entertainment like cinemas or concert halls.

What about comparing it to the cost of actually sky diving out of a plane?

numerobis

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #107 on: November 23, 2017, 01:43:33 AM »
How many who would go to one of these centres would jump out of an airplane instead?

Neven

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #108 on: November 23, 2017, 09:01:17 AM »
Most energy efficient would be to allow only jumps without parachutes.  ;)
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Jim Hunt

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #109 on: November 23, 2017, 02:04:46 PM »
Talking of "smart homes", we're currently collaborating with the SPECIFIC project in South Wales.

See their "Active Classroom" and "SOLCER House":

http://www.V2G.co.uk/2015/07/solcer-zero-carbon-house-wins-innovation-in-sustainability-award/

Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

numerobis

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #110 on: November 23, 2017, 04:43:09 PM »
That picture makes me think “Welsh Gothic”.

After signing a mortgage yesterday, I ordered weatherproofing tape and plastic sheeting for the windows in the new house — the type you blow-dry to shrink up tight. Via amazon, so it’ll be flown in of course (at the local store it would have 2-3x as much).

Next summer we’ll install new windows and doors. The current ones are leaky.

TerryM

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #111 on: November 24, 2017, 11:04:28 AM »
That picture makes me think “Welsh Gothic”.

After signing a mortgage yesterday, I ordered weatherproofing tape and plastic sheeting for the windows in the new house — the type you blow-dry to shrink up tight. Via amazon, so it’ll be flown in of course (at the local store it would have 2-3x as much).

Next summer we’ll install new windows and doors. The current ones are leaky.


Congratulations on your purchase! I had no idea that your attachment to the north ran so deeply. I had dinner last Sunday with an archaeologist whose 4 children were all born in the Canadian Arctic. His eldest is just finishing her nursing education and will be headed your way once school's out.


I was very impressed by the "SHED" concept described in Jim's post just above your's & wonder if their seasonal storage techniques could be developed for the Arctic. I can't imagine that heat storage would suffice through your long winters, but even a 10% reduction in heating energy usage could make a difference.
They specifically mention retrofitting an existing structure, and from what I could see the costs were on the front end with very few expenses thereafter.


Stay Warm
Terry

numerobis

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #112 on: November 24, 2017, 01:18:40 PM »
It helps that $2500/month rents me a smaller place than $1200/month in costs (interest, heating, taxes, etc). At that rate it doesn’t take too long to pay off the transaction costs.

Jim Hunt

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #113 on: November 24, 2017, 04:25:20 PM »
I was very impressed by the "SHED" concept described in Jim's post just above your's & wonder if their seasonal storage techniques could be developed for the Arctic.

An intriguing thought Terry. I'll mention it to the SPECIFIC team, but it's a long way from Swansea to the shores of the Arctic!
« Last Edit: November 25, 2017, 02:57:41 PM by Jim Hunt »
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

numerobis

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #114 on: November 24, 2017, 07:16:56 PM »
It strikes me that Canada just decided to put some pocket change into social housing again (40 billion!!!!... over ten years).

I wonder how much will be built with energy efficiency in mind. The top priority may be to put a roof over everyone's head, but if the house is cheaper to operate, it becomes easier to keep people in the house.

--------

In the Arctic we generally get great hot sun from about February to July in Iqaluit, a bit later on both ends further North. Basically, the season starts as soon as the day is long enough and ends when we switch to a marine climate or the day gets short.

January/February is the coldest and darkest, and solar heat is unlikely to do anything about that. But we heat nearly year round (and we use hot water year-round), so there's plenty of room for solar heating to reduce our oil boiler use.

I'm planning on looking into solar hot water for our place.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2017, 07:27:13 PM by numerobis »

gerontocrat

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #115 on: November 24, 2017, 08:39:21 PM »
It strikes me that Canada just decided to put some pocket change into social housing again (40 billion!!!!... over ten years).

I wonder how much will be built with energy efficiency in mind. The top priority may be to put a roof over everyone's head, but if the house is cheaper to operate, it becomes easier to keep people in the house.

--------

In the Arctic we generally get great hot sun from about February to July in Iqaluit, a bit later on both ends further North. Basically, the season starts as soon as the day is long enough and ends when we switch to a marine climate or the day gets short.

January/February is the coldest and darkest, and solar heat is unlikely to do anything about that. But we heat nearly year round (and we use hot water year-round), so there's plenty of room for solar heating to reduce our oil boiler use.

I'm planning on looking into solar hot water for our place.
A wind farm for the city ?
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"

ghoti

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #116 on: November 24, 2017, 10:43:25 PM »
I wonder how much will be built with energy efficiency in mind. The top priority may be to put a roof over everyone's head, but if the house is cheaper to operate, it becomes easier to keep people in the house.
In Ontario at least the building code has been updated to require significant energy efficiency features. For example basement walls must be insulated to at least R20, underlying slab to R10 plus it requires continuous insulation:
An uninterrupted layer of insulation that spans over substrate without thermal
bridging, other than fasteners and services. A continuous layer of insulation
helps reduce the potential for condensation within the wall where mold and
mildew can accumulate undetected.

Roof insulation now needs to be R50 or more.

In Ottawa a recent social housing building was built to Passive House standards.

So you can pretty much count on new construction being reasonably efficient.

Mathiasdm

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #117 on: November 25, 2017, 06:56:23 AM »
Roof insulation now needs to be R50 or more.

In Ottawa a recent social housing building was built to Passive House standards.

So you can pretty much count on new construction being reasonably efficient.
Hm, is this R-value different than the insulation standards in Europe?

I'm currently building a house, and our roof has 22 cm of glasswool (lambda 0.035) and 3 cm of rockwool (lambda 0.035).
The R-value is thickness/lambda = 0.25/0.035 = 7.14.
Is this a different type of R-value? Because the R50 you mention would, with the above calculation, be 1.75 meter of insulation.

Edit: the joys of the metric and imperial systems...
Wikipedia states:
    R-value (U.S.) = RSI (SI) × 5.678263337
    RSI (SI) = R-value (U.S.) × 0.1761101838

So the R-value I calculated would in the US and Canada (I thought you guys used metric?) correspond to a value of 40.

ghoti

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #118 on: November 25, 2017, 05:47:04 PM »
So the R-value I calculated would in the US and Canada (I thought you guys used metric?) correspond to a value of 40.
Canada's economy is fully integrated with the US so even though it technically uses the metric system many things are described in US units.

numerobis

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Re: Energy Efficiency: The “First Fuel”
« Reply #119 on: November 26, 2017, 06:11:44 PM »
It’s at least as much inertia as US integration. Some things that don’t matter at all are in British customary units.

Example 1: at the grocery in Montreal, the price will be eg $2.18/kg in big print. A very strange number, until you read the small print 0.99/lb. When I was a child, the price was only in pounds, and in Iqaluit, the price is in round numbers per kilo. Coffee in Montreal is now generally sold by the 500g bag, rather than by the pound; and cheese prices are “round” numbers per 100g. So there’s progress.

Example 2: a block of tofu is generally 454g. I’ve never heard anyone other than me call it a pound of tofu, it just happens to be that weight rather than some other number (325g is the other common size). There’s not much cross-border trade in tofu; it’s just too easy to plop down a factory.

Example 3: order a beer and you’ll get a pint. Not a US pint (16 fl oz) but an imperial pint (20 fl oz).