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Author Topic: Adapting to the Anthropocene  (Read 68243 times)

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #300 on: August 22, 2017, 06:34:33 PM »
As I am suggesting the use of mindful wisdom as a preferred path for adapting to the Anthropocene, I provide the attached quotes from the Buddha:
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #301 on: August 22, 2017, 06:37:49 PM »
As I have indicated that I believe that the 4th Industrial Revolution (possibly with a technological singularity circa 2047) is also in our collective future, I provide the following quotes from Steve Jobs:
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #302 on: September 03, 2017, 08:08:58 PM »
Clearly, climate change has influenced human evolution and just as clearly, evolution will be part of humanity's adaption to the Anthropocene:

Title: "How Humans Are Shaping Our Own Evolution"

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/04/evolution-genetics-medicine-brain-technology-cyborg/

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/04/are-we-evolving-illustrations-stand-alone/#technology-versus-natural-selection

Extract: "In our world now, the primary mover for reproductive success—and thus evolutionary change—is culture, and its weaponized cousin, technology. That’s because evolution is no match for the speed and variety of modern life.

“DNA was left in the dust by cultural evolution,” he says, “but now it’s catching up.”"

See also:

Title: "Did Ancient Climate Change Ignite Human Evolution?

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/did-ancient-climate-change-ignite-human-evolution/

Extract: "How drying forests and lightning may have turned fire from a primal threat into a life-sustaining object of reverence"

&

Title: "Climate Effects on Human Evolution"

http://humanorigins.si.edu/research/climate-and-human-evolution/climate-effects-human-evolution
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

miki

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #303 on: September 03, 2017, 08:14:15 PM »
I thought I would drop this here. Business and government will have to adapt, after all.

http://www.earthandwatergroup.com/climate-change/link-between-stronger-science-and-climate-litigation-risks-new-report/

Nature Geoscience‘s publishes ‘Acts of God, human influence and litigation‘ – a report, co-authored by Earth & Water Law Partner Lindene Patton, which looks at how developments in attribution science impact legal foreseeability of extreme weather events and the duties of built environment professionals, business and government in the face of a changing climate.

"The science of extreme weather attribution is improving rapidly, and is making important predictions about future weather events.  This means the legal duties of those responsible for keeping people, the built environment and the natural world safe are changing too.  Identifying the human influence in events once only understood as ‘acts of god’ will reshape the legal landscape, meaning governments and businesses could be sued if they don’t take action to protect people from floods, heatwaves and other foreseeable climate change risks."

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #304 on: September 05, 2017, 03:59:23 PM »
The linked open access reference illustrates how quantum information science is not only about AI but can also be used for de-cloaking stealth technology:

La Heras et al (2017), "Quantum illumination reveals phase-shift inducing cloaking", Scientific Reports 7, Article no. 9333, doi:10.1038/s41598-017-0850-w

http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-08505-w

“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

6roucho

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #305 on: September 05, 2017, 06:45:46 PM »
AbruptSLR, I think there's a great deal of philosophy you may be missing out on, which has nothing to do with theology. As Anne says, most of western philosophy (including metaphysics) has the objective of being rigorously empirical; of making real statements about the world, and of defining what form those statements can meaningfully take. Much of the stringency of the scientific method has its roots in the rigours of formal philosophical discourse. Wittgenstein [or Karl Popper] might be a better starting point than eastern mystics.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2017, 07:19:22 PM by 6roucho »

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #306 on: September 05, 2017, 09:46:35 PM »
AbruptSLR, I think there's a great deal of philosophy you may be missing out on, which has nothing to do with theology. As Anne says, most of western philosophy (including metaphysics) has the objective of being rigorously empirical; of making real statements about the world, and of defining what form those statements can meaningfully take. Much of the stringency of the scientific method has its roots in the rigours of formal philosophical discourse. Wittgenstein [or Karl Popper] might be a better starting point than eastern mystics.


6roucho,

Certainly I have a lot to learn; however, from what I know about Popperism; while I support its emphasis on empirical verification, it seems to me that it downplays the use of inductive logic too much.  Popper was a man of the 20th century, but our current 21st century problems and information science can make good use of holographic theory (which I suspect you mistake for eastern mysticism) together with inductive logic to tackle 'wicked problems' (see the first attached image), like climate change.

In this regards, the linked video, and associated pdf & second attached image, illustrate holographic entanglement theory:

Title: “A New Perspective on Holographic Entanglement by Matthew Headrick”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfQcHzuH-dQ

See also:

http://people.brandeis.edu/~headrick/talks/NewPerspective.pdf

The holographic universe can be interpreted conceptually using String Theory in twelve dimensions (i.e. F-Theory), where lower order dimensions (like the four dimensional time-space continuum of common day experiences) can be taken as the boundary entangled with a higher order bulk (such as the event horizon of a black hole considered in Matthew Headrick's video & pdf).  Furthermore, in my opinion entanglement can be taken as the condition of interacting with the higher order bulk through an imaginary interface/boundary on which classical information appears (see the third image).  However, this interaction is dynamic resulting in a dialectic process such as illustrated in the fourth attached image.  I will discuss this gestalt further in my next post.

Best,
ASLR
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #307 on: September 05, 2017, 09:49:01 PM »
As a follow-on to my last post, the linked videos present talks by John Preskill that discuss how quantum information science could help to understand a holographic universe:

“"Quantum Computing and the Entanglement Frontier" John Preskill, CalTech”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdAI1KQnhU4

&

"John Preskill: Quantum information and spacetime (I)"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=td1fz5NLjQs

&

“John Preskill: Quantum information and spacetime (II)”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_i4Z5qARmqY

The four images illustrate how quantum information science can be used to holistically correct for errors in an entangled holographic universe by correlating the bulk with the boundary information/operators.  This paradigm will be very useful in quantum computing and in AI development in the coming few decades.
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #308 on: September 05, 2017, 10:11:02 PM »
For those interested in holography, the linked reference provides more background:

M.P. Benowitz (2017), "Universal Theory of General Invariance"

http://vixra.org/abs/1708.0190
&
http://vixra.org/pdf/1708.0190v1.pdf

For the abstract see the first attached image

Extract: "Through the introduction of the Principle of General Invariance, three additional quantum mechanical postulates have been put forth. Postulates I & II propose entanglement and holography arise from an underlying noncommutative structure between spatial positions and directions. Postulate III proposes an observationally motivated field equation governing these noncommutative degrees of freedom. The solution to this equation yields a coupled system of equations of state, describing the thermodynamics of the vacuum. To great surprise, these equations predict the existence of the vacua Mon and Mooff. These so-called atoms of spacetime reproduce the observations of the ^CDM model of cosmology { bringing dark energy, dark matter, inflation, and gravitation into a single unified framework. Finally, (and most importantly) we've designed a relatively simple and inexpensive table-top experiment to falsify such extraordinary claims."

The second attached image illustrates how in this holographic model virtual particles formed out of fluctuation of the vacuum are entangled when they are formed.
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

6roucho

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #309 on: September 06, 2017, 10:47:42 AM »
AbruptSLR, no: as a [sometimes] working mathematician, I do know the difference between holographic theory and eastern mysticism. I make far bigger mistakes than that, as in my previous dumb comment to you. :-)

But I take your point. I'm not positioning philosophy relative to science, but as as a necessary part of it. Popper doesn't downplay empiricism: he considers its limits. Without epistemology, we'd lack part of the formal language necessary for understanding what true statements mean. Without the language to define proof, how can we have proof?

So, in that sense, we do still need the 20th century.

There's a lame undergraduate joke that "Even Karl Popper gets up in the morning." That's a reference to Popper's [rigorous] disproof of inductive logic. It isn't possible to prove anything by induction, even if induction is useful. Like many useful tools, understanding its limits is a necessary precursor to using it, since otherwise we might feel we've proved things we haven't.

What the joke means is that even though we can't prove the sun will rise tomorrow, simply by reference to a large set of data, it probably will. And probability, in the end, is all we have to go in in the physical sciences. Observing a thing five times doesn't mean it will happen a sixth time, even if we understand all the reasons. One day, that electron [or table] *will* tunnel through that wall. All we need is sufficient time.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 11:43:14 AM by 6roucho »

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #310 on: September 06, 2017, 04:18:37 PM »
All we need is sufficient time.
Perhaps you do not appreciate the differences between the teachings of the Buddha and eastern mysticism. The Buddha taught that there is no magic in the universe, yet to reach the ultimate empirical truth he taught that one must transcend the illusions of time and space (as proven by holographic theory), using the recursive application of: deductive logic, inductive logic, the reduction of entropy, concentration/focus/effort/work and letting go of preconditioning; all of which underpin the scientific method.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 05:36:26 PM by AbruptSLR »
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #311 on: September 06, 2017, 06:46:17 PM »
The linked article (& associated open access reference) describes a new path forward to develop a general purpose prototype silicon quantum integrated circuit by 2022, with a general purpose commercial quantum computer to follow shortly thereafter:

Title: "Radical New Quantum Computing Design Invented"

https://www.rdmag.com/news/2017/09/radical-new-quantum-computing-design-invented

Extract: "Engineers at Australia’s University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel ‘flip-flop qubits’, that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper – and easier – than thought possible.

The new chip design, detailed in the journal Nature Communications, allows for a silicon quantum processor that can be scaled up without the precise placement of atoms required in other approaches. Importantly, it allows quantum bits (or ‘qubits’) – the basic unit of information in a quantum computer – to be placed hundreds of nanometres apart and still remain coupled.

“What Guilherme and the team have invented is a new way to define a ‘spin qubit’ that uses both the electron and the nucleus of the atom. Crucially, this new qubit can be controlled using electric signals, instead of magnetic ones. Electric signals are significantly easier to distribute and localise within an electronic chip.”

Tosi said the design sidesteps a challenge that all spin-based silicon qubits were expected to face as teams begin building larger and larger arrays of qubits: the need to space them at a distance of only 10-20 nanometres, or just 50 atoms apart.

“If they're too close, or too far apart, the ‘entanglement’ between quantum bits – which is what makes quantum computers so special – doesn’t occur,” Tosi said.

At the other end of the spectrum are superconducting circuits – pursued, for instance, by IBM and Google – and ion traps. These systems are large and easier to fabricate, and are currently leading the way in the number of qubits that can be operated. However, due to their larger dimensions, in the long run they may face challenges when trying to assemble and operate millions of qubits, as required by the most useful quantum algorithms.

“Our new silicon-based approach sits right at the sweet spot,” said Morello, a professor of quantum engineering at UNSW. “It’s easier to fabricate than atomic-scale devices, but still allows us to place a million qubits on a square millimetre.”

In the single-atom qubit used by Morello’s team, and which Tosi’s new design applies, a silicon chip is covered with a layer of insulating silicon oxide, on top of which rests a pattern of metallic electrodes that operate at temperatures near absolute zero and in the presence of a very strong magnetic field.

At the core is a phosphorus atom, from which Morello’s team has previously built two functional qubits using an electron and the nucleus of the atom. These qubits, taken individually, have demonstrated world-record coherence times.

Tosi’s conceptual breakthrough is the creation of an entirely new type of qubit, using both the nucleus andthe electron. In this approach, a qubit ‘0’ state is defined when the spin of the electron is down and the nucleus spin is up, while the ‘1’ state is  when the electron spin is up, and the nuclear spin is down.

“We call it the ‘flip-flop’ qubit,” said Tosi. “To operate this qubit, you need to pull the electron a little bit away from the nucleus, using the electrodes at the top. By doing so, you also create an electric dipole.”

The UNSW team has struck a A$83 million deal between UNSW, telco giant Telstra, Australia’s Commonwealth Bank and the Australian and New South Wales governments to develop, by 2022, a 10-qubit prototype silicon quantum integrated circuit – the first step in building the world’s first quantum computer in silicon."

See the associated reference:

Tosi et al (2017), "Silicon quantum processor with robust long-distance qubit coupling", Nature Communications 8, Article no. 450; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00378-x
 
http://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-00378-x
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #312 on: September 06, 2017, 08:42:59 PM »
Here is a June 2017 Wired article about the SF Bay Area effort toward providing general purpose commercial quantum computers in the next five plus years:

Title: "The Quantum Computer Factory That’s Taking on Google and IBM"

https://www.wired.com/story/quantum-computing-factory-taking-on-google-ibm/

Extract: "No company is yet very close to offering up a quantum computer ready to do useful work existing computers can't. But Google has pledged to commercialize the technology within five years. IBM offers a cloud platform intended as a warmup for a future commercial service that lets developers and researchers play with a prototype chip located in Big Blue’s labs. After a few years of mostly staying quiet, Rigetti is now entering the fray. The company on Tuesday launched its own cloud platform, called Forest, where developers can write code for simulated quantum computers, and some partners get to access the startup's existing quantum hardware. Rigetti gave WIRED a peek at the new manufacturing facility in Fremont—grandly dubbed Fab-1—that just started making chips for testing at the company's headquarters in Berkeley.

But for now, the quantum computing chips in existence are too small to do things conventional computers can't. IBM recently announced one with 16 qubits—the components needed to build a quantum computer—and Google is gunning for around 50 qubits this year. Rigetti has made chips with 8 qubits; it says the new fab will speed up the experimentation needed to increase that number. No one knows for sure, but it’s estimated you’d need hundreds of qubits or more to do useful work on chemistry problems, which seem to be the lowest-hanging fruit for quantum computers."
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

6roucho

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #313 on: September 07, 2017, 12:35:22 PM »
All we need is sufficient time.
Perhaps you do not appreciate the differences between the teachings of the Buddha and eastern mysticism. The Buddha taught that there is no magic in the universe, yet to reach the ultimate empirical truth he taught that one must transcend the illusions of time and space (as proven by holographic theory), using the recursive application of: deductive logic, inductive logic, the reduction of entropy, concentration/focus/effort/work and letting go of preconditioning; all of which underpin the scientific method.
Maybe I don't. I consider some of the teachings of the Buddha to be eastern mysticism, since they include unprovable metaphysics, such as reincarnation.  I also consider some of the ideas of my my own religion [Taoism] to be mysticism, although somewhat less so, since Taoism rejects the unprovable.

That doesn't mean *all* of the teachings of Buddha are mysticism. It's easy to find elements of both religions that align with [and predate] modern physics.

I have no problem with mysticism, as long as we recognise it as such, and we're sufficiently rigorous about how we allow it to inform us about the nature of reality. There's undoubtedly a spiritual realm. How and where is crosses the Real is a valuable question.

wili

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #314 on: September 07, 2017, 03:08:30 PM »
6goucho, good  points. But there are those who claim that most of the what you call 'mysticism' in Buddhism are not core to the philosophy/religion, and are in a way accretions. See Buddhism without beliefs:

https://www.amazon.com/Buddhism-Without-Beliefs-Contemporary-Awakening/dp/1573226564
"A force de chercher de bonnes raisons, on en trouve; on les dit; et après on y tient, non pas tant parce qu'elles sont bonnes que pour ne pas se démentir." Choderlos de Laclos "You struggle to come up with some valid reasons, then cling to them, not because they're good, but just to not back down."

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #315 on: September 07, 2017, 04:51:40 PM »
6goucho, good  points. But there are those who claim that most of the what you call 'mysticism' in Buddhism are not core to the philosophy/religion, and are in a way accretions. See Buddhism without beliefs:

https://www.amazon.com/Buddhism-Without-Beliefs-Contemporary-Awakening/dp/1573226564

wili,

You are correct as the Buddha never taught a religion nor 'mysticism'.  It is disingenuous to hold the Buddha to task because subsequent generations do not fully understand (i.e. misinterpret) what he taught.  For example, the Buddha taught that time is an illusion, so reincarnation cannot mean what 6roucho is implying what it means.  The Buddha's teaching appear to be paradoxical to those who live within pre-conditioned bubbles, in much the same way as people living in a 4D time-space continuum would find that M-theory would stand for Magic-theory.  Indeed, Popper taught about the dangers of inductive logic, but each morning he applied inductive reasoning to trust that the floor would be there when he got out of bed in the morning.

Best,
ASLR
« Last Edit: September 08, 2017, 06:22:10 PM by AbruptSLR »
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AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #316 on: September 08, 2017, 06:30:12 PM »
The linked article indicates that Microsoft's use of Majoranas to produce general purpose quantum computers is making rapid progress:

https://www.scientificcomputing.com/news/2017/09/quantum-detectives-hunt-worlds-first-quantum-computer

Extract: "Scientists at the University of Sydney are entering a new phase of development to scale up the next generation of quantum-engineered devices.

These devices will form the heart of the first practical topological* quantum computers.

Dr Cassidy said that building these quantum devices is a "bit like going on a detective hunt".
"When Majorana fermions were first shown to exist in 2012, there were many who said there could be other explanations for the findings," she said.

A challenge to show the findings were caused by Majoranas was put to the research team led by Professor Leo Kouwenhoven, who now leads Microsoft's Station Q in the Netherlands."
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #317 on: September 09, 2017, 05:17:33 PM »
I have previously discussed the works of Dacher Keltner in this thread, and in the following reference he teams with Alan Cowen to categorize the number of self-reported emotions identified by people:

Alan Cowen & Dacher Keltner (2017), "Self-report captures 27 distinct categories of emotion bridged by continuous gradients", Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1702247114

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/08/30/1702247114.abstract

Significance
Claims about how reported emotional experiences are geometrically organized within a semantic space have shaped the study of emotion. Using statistical methods to analyze reports of emotional states elicited by 2,185 emotionally evocative short videos with richly varying situational content, we uncovered 27 varieties of reported emotional experience. Reported experience is better captured by categories such as “amusement” than by ratings of widely measured affective dimensions such as valence and arousal. Although categories are found to organize dimensional appraisals in a coherent and powerful fashion, many categories are linked by smooth gradients, contrary to discrete theories. Our results comprise an approximation of a geometric structure of reported emotional experience.

Abstract
Emotions are centered in subjective experiences that people represent, in part, with hundreds, if not thousands, of semantic terms. Claims about the distribution of reported emotional states and the boundaries between emotion categories—that is, the geometric organization of the semantic space of emotion—have sparked intense debate. Here we introduce a conceptual framework to analyze reported emotional states elicited by 2,185 short videos, examining the richest array of reported emotional experiences studied to date and the extent to which reported experiences of emotion are structured by discrete and dimensional geometries. Across self-report methods, we find that the videos reliably elicit 27 distinct varieties of reported emotional experience. Further analyses revealed that categorical labels such as amusement better capture reports of subjective experience than commonly measured affective dimensions (e.g., valence and arousal). Although reported emotional experiences are represented within a semantic space best captured by categorical labels, the boundaries between categories of emotion are fuzzy rather than discrete. By analyzing the distribution of reported emotional states we uncover gradients of emotion—from anxiety to fear to horror to disgust, calmness to aesthetic appreciation to awe, and others—that correspond to smooth variation in affective dimensions such as valence and dominance. Reported emotional states occupy a complex, high-dimensional categorical space. In addition, our library of videos and an interactive map of the emotional states they elicit (https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/emogifs/map.html) are made available to advance the science of emotion.

See also:

Title: "Scientists discover there are 27 different emotions"

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11920286

Extract: "While it was originally thought we feel just six emotions, researchers at UC Berkeley found 27 distinct human emotions and have displayed them on an interactive map.

In addition to happiness, sadness, anger, surprise, fear, and, disgust, they also determined confusion, romance, nostalgia, sexual desire, and others to be distinct emotions …

The 27 emotions humans feel
Admiration
Adoration
Aesthetic Appreciation
Amusement
Anxiety
Awe
Awkwardness
Boredom
Calmness
Confusion
Craving
Disgust
Empathetic pain
Entrancement
Envy
Excitement
Fear
Horror
Interest
Joy
Nostalgia
Romance
Sadness
Satisfaction
Sexual desire
Sympathy
Triumph"
« Last Edit: September 09, 2017, 05:45:14 PM by AbruptSLR »
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #318 on: September 09, 2017, 05:40:26 PM »
I note that the development of compassion via Mettā-panna would be helpful in adapting to the Anthropocene:

Title: "Compassion Is Better than Empathy"

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-clarity/201703/compassion-is-better-empathy

Extract: "… too much empathy can be debilitating. When we become too distressed about the suffering of others, we don’t have the cognitive and emotional resources available to do much to help them. Having compassion, a cognitive understanding how they’re feeling, is better for our own well-being and the well-being of those in need.

The idea that there can actually be too much empathy can be traced back to early  Buddhist teachings. Instead of focusing on empathy to the point of draining ourselves emotionally, Buddhism teaches the practice of compassion …

By deliberately imagining yourself, your loved ones, people you feel neutral about, and even people you dislike, experiencing happiness and freedom – you make the world a kinder place. Research in Loving-Kindness meditation shows it builds emotional resilience and meaningful social connections which can help you respond to challenges with compassion."

See also the linked Wikipedia article entitled: "Mettā"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mett%C4%81

On a related matter, I believe that 'western' philosophy tends to focus too much on the battle between 'good' and 'evil'; while these words express pre-conditioned concepts that can be better dealt with by breaking them down into more fundamental 'truths' as illustrated by the two attached images relating the pre-conditioned concept of 'evil' to its more fundamental relations to the lack of empathy.

Edit: Regarding the first image, Gilbert was the psychologist for the tribunal at the Nuremberg trails.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2017, 07:36:50 PM by AbruptSLR »
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson