Please support this Forum and Neven's Blog

Author Topic: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action  (Read 58423 times)

Sigmetnow

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 9355
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #300 on: January 10, 2017, 07:47:05 PM »
Just sitting and watching streaming video can greatly increase your carbon footprint.

Binge-watching is going to make your carbon footprint soar
Greenpeace on Tuesday released its annual "Clicking Clean" report, which scores digital companies on their environmental performance.

The report lists Apple, Google, Facebook and data center operator Switch as the IT sector's top achievers. All of the firms have made significant investments in renewable energy and energy efficiency at their data centers, offices and, in Apple's case, manufacturing sites.
...
But video streaming companies, including Netflix, HBO and Amazon, are lagging, according to Greenpeace.

All three firms scored poorly in the new report after flunking categories such as "energy transparency" and "renewable procurement," which refer to efforts to purchase cleaner electrons or invest in wind and solar projects. ...
http://mashable.com/2017/01/10/greenpeace-report-video-streaming-carbon-emissions/
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

budmantis

  • ASIF Upper Class
  • Posts: 1169
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #301 on: January 11, 2017, 07:18:45 AM »
Ouch! Great post Sigmetnow, and very informative.

nicibiene

  • ASIF Lurker
  • Posts: 95
    • View Profile
    • www.nicibiene.de
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #302 on: January 11, 2017, 10:06:38 AM »
Just streamed a speech of Al Gore at YouTube  ;D. It is not brand-new but it was new to me. A real great, impressive presentation. I didn't knew by now about exact developement of renewables in the graphics he showed. Didn't knew about the number of stopped coal plants in US by now-just read about China. It leaves me with some more optimism. 😊  https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=u7E1v24Dllk
“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” –“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.” Albert Einstein

Sigmetnow

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 9355
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #303 on: January 12, 2017, 07:47:35 PM »
Tonight at 8pm Eastern, the documentary "We Know Not What We Do", featuring Katharine Hayhoe, Richard Alley and John Cook from Skeptical Science, airs on Link TV (channel 9410 on Dish Network and 375 on Direct TV). Air times:

Thursday Jan 12 - 8:00pm Eastern and again at 8:00pm Pacific
Tuesday Jan 24 - 12:00noon Pacific (3:00pm Eastern) and 11:00pm Pacific (2:00am Eastern Jan 25)
Saturday Jan 28 -  2:00am Pacific (5:00am Eastern)
Thursday Feb 2 - 6:00am Pacific (9:00am Eastern)
 Friday Feb 3 - 2:00am Pacific (5:00am Eastern)

“We Know Not What We Do” travels the world to spotlight areas, both rural and urban, interviewing some of the brightest minds alive today, to find out what exactly is being sacrificed because of our unbridled addiction for fossil fuels. The film explores our ideas of “wealth,” and questions our misconceptions of expansion and economic growth. Can we cut back, cut down or even completely change our course for alternative sustainable energies without throwing our world into chaos? Can we shift our priorities? Is it possible for our species to become a tight knit community of human beings that can work together for survival? As many ignore this puzzle altogether, “We Know Not What We Do” urges that we face this challenge, solve the dilemma, or run the risk of extinction.

Trailer here:  https://www.linktv.org/shows/we-know-not-what-we-do/episodes/we-know-not-what-we-do
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 9355
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #304 on: January 19, 2017, 04:48:47 PM »
Oliver Milman:  Record number of Americans now view global warming as “very worrying” according to Yale
https://mobile.twitter.com/EricHolthaus/status/821764807250485248
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

DrTskoul

  • ASIF Middle Class
  • Posts: 802
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #305 on: January 19, 2017, 05:40:34 PM »
Oliver Milman:  Record number of Americans now view global warming as “very worrying” according to Yale
https://mobile.twitter.com/EricHolthaus/status/821764807250485248

Still too damn low...
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

Archimid

  • ASIF Middle Class
  • Posts: 680
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #306 on: June 11, 2017, 02:39:33 PM »
“Believe In Climate Change” The Way You Believe In Gravity

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/06/10/believe-climate-change-way-believe-gravity/

The problem is that outside of the odd politician who was actually a climate scientist, the vast majority of people can’t claim to understand climate change or global warming with any degree of sincerity or completeness. At best, the average layperson or even well educated layperson will have a superficial understanding of anything beyond the basics.

Let’s take an analogy that might be useful. Do you understand gravity, or just believe in it? Let’s test this out.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

AbruptSLR

  • ASIF Emperor
  • Posts: 12960
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #307 on: July 14, 2017, 06:25:20 PM »
It looks like American political leaders are wearing rose-colored glasses w.r.t. their accountability to voters on climate change

"Study: On climate change and elsewhere, politicians more conservative than citizens"

https://www.skepticalscience.com/politicians-more-conservative-than-citizens.html

Extract: "Academics have identified a skew in American politics, in which policies that are implemented are much more conservative than average Americans prefer. A new paper  by David Broockman at Stanford University and Christopher Skovron from the University of Michigan suggests a cause for this disparity: American politicians perceive their constituents’ positions as more conservative than they are in actuality on a wide range of issues; for example, Republican politicians tend to overestimate support for their conservative health care views by a whopping 20 percentage points. As Broockman and his colleague Christopher Warshaw of MIT put it in an article for the New York Times: “Research shows that politicians are surprisingly poor at estimating public opinion in their districts and state, Republicans in particular.” This in turn appears to be caused by greater political engagement among conservative constituents, who contact their members of Congress more frequently than liberal voters."
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

TerryM

  • ASIF Upper Class
  • Posts: 2014
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #308 on: July 14, 2017, 07:36:19 PM »
It looks like American political leaders are wearing rose-colored glasses w.r.t. their accountability to voters on climate change

"Study: On climate change and elsewhere, politicians more conservative than citizens"

https://www.skepticalscience.com/politicians-more-conservative-than-citizens.html

Extract: "Academics have identified a skew in American politics, in which policies that are implemented are much more conservative than average Americans prefer. A new paper  by David Broockman at Stanford University and Christopher Skovron from the University of Michigan suggests a cause for this disparity: American politicians perceive their constituents’ positions as more conservative than they are in actuality on a wide range of issues; for example, Republican politicians tend to overestimate support for their conservative health care views by a whopping 20 percentage points. As Broockman and his colleague Christopher Warshaw of MIT put it in an article for the New York Times: “Research shows that politicians are surprisingly poor at estimating public opinion in their districts and state, Republicans in particular.” This in turn appears to be caused by greater political engagement among conservative constituents, who contact their members of Congress more frequently than liberal voters."


A clarion call to man our pens?
Terry

rboyd

  • ASIF Middle Class
  • Posts: 559
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #309 on: July 14, 2017, 08:44:17 PM »
The US politicians may also just be extremely effective at gauging the views of their major donors, rather than their constituents.

VeliAlbertKallio

  • ASIF Citizen
  • Posts: 126
    • View Profile
    • Sea Research Society (SRS)
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #310 on: July 15, 2017, 12:09:04 AM »
    <Discussion moved here from 2017 melting season>

    High level of ice pulverization has the SAME ultimate effect as melt water ponds. Fact No. 1!
    The gaps within sea ice (albedo only 5%) mop up sunlight which turns into heat - that percolates into nearby ice. Warm and dark water on top of ice, or beside and under it - really NO difference.

    Whether warm water that licks the ice is due to water ponds, or warm water created by dark leads nearby --> water travels past and beneath (and also around) moving ice floes
    (sea ice warms <=> sea water cools).

    People fail to see the synergies of insolation, albedo and sea ice pulverization. In the past the sea ice pulverized only from the margins, leaving the affected area very small with a minimal effect to overall Arctic sea ice area tally (especially CAB wasn't ARIEL powder what it is today).

    The August 2012 shaker-storm was the eye-opener to many how pulverized ice makes its demise easier. The real psychological thriller to me here is that some people constantly deny the change or admit but fail to apply it. Sort of ice hopium, we already know that 2017 sea ice volume is low and ice is thinner than usual due to bad winter. Yet, the weather is an unpredictable trickster.

    In psychology a term 'mortality salience' describes people that live just beneath water dam. They think about the collapse danger of dam LESS than people who live 20 kilometers downstream. Why? I think we all have this issue here, the ice is bad, there is very bad, bad methane hidden under it, and then there is this big 'lump of ice on the land' next corner. So we shut up our minds.

    Sea ice is not a problem-isolate. It is linked to all problems with melting permafrost soils and methane storing seabed, coastal mountains glued together by frozen water only (recall July tsunami in Greenland): So, also problems have a synergy within them (the sum is greater than its the sum of its individual components), this last thing was my core message at UK Houses of Parliament in April:
https://www.academia.edu/33000316/MPs_to_review_UKs_role_in_Arctic_sustainability_-_24th_April_2017.docx [/li][/list]

: F.Tnioli  Today at 11:39:45 AM

    : VeliAlbertKallio  Today at 12:38:29 AM

        ... The countless leads also mop up sunlight near the Pole most efficiently. ...

    Obviously, yes. July is high insolation month, and lots of CAB now takes it head-on. Combined with lesser thickness in many places, this is nothing short of catastrophic development in me book, especially if it would last in significant proportions for mere 1 more week. Any clues whether it would, Veli?

Modify message
Report to moderator   92.41.60.203

Tigertown

  • ASIF Upper Class
  • Posts: 1627
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #311 on: July 15, 2017, 05:22:00 AM »
<Discussion moved here from 2017 melting season>

Thanks for re-posting this instead of tossing it, as I wanted to read it again.
 Especially this part,
 
High level of ice pulverization has the SAME ultimate effect as melt water ponds. Fact No. 1!
The gaps within sea ice (albedo only 5%) mop up sunlight which turns into heat - that percolates into nearby ice. Warm and dark water on top of ice, or beside and under it - really NO difference.
   I think this deserves pondering at the least, considering the situation this year.

magnamentis

  • ASIF Upper Class
  • Posts: 1229
    • View Profile
    • Nexpaq Modular ARA iOS Software Mobile Computing Phones Philosophy Ethics Numerology Mikrocirkulation Vaskular Therapie Gesundheit Blut Gesundheit Schmerzen Multipelsklerose Diabetes Immunsystem Fibromyalgie
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #312 on: July 15, 2017, 06:50:50 PM »

Thanks for re-posting this instead of tossing it, as I wanted to read it again.

+1 i indeed like to read K's posts as well and don't have a problem with their length, hence it is good we got a dedicated thread for those. keep going, a lot of valuable input for laymen like me.
http://magnamentis.com
Knowledge, Understanding & Insight Are Among The Best Sources For Personal Freedom & Vitality !

Sigmetnow

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 9355
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #313 on: July 20, 2017, 12:58:57 PM »
At first glance, this resolution appears laughingly inadequate.  And it is.  But remember, North Carolina is the state that passed a law in 2012 forbidding the use of sea level rise forecasts.

Wilmington City Council passes resolution addressing climate change
The resolution asks that state and national leaders support policies that would reduce carbon emissions. It also lists initiatives by the city to reduce emissions like increasing the number of hybrid vehicles used by the city and reducing waste through the landfill diversion program.

"We are almost at 100 percent compliance with our citizens in voluntarily recycling in the city of Wilmington," Saffo said. "That's telling me that the citizens want to do their part in improving the environment, recycling stuff they use in their everyday lives, and extending the life of our landfill here, which is very precious to all of us."
http://www.wect.com/story/35920918/wilmington-city-council-passes-resolution-addressing-climate-change?

The history (2015 article):
The State That 'Outlawed Climate Change' Accepts Latest [short term] Sea-Level Rise Report
Five years ago, the Science Panel of the North Carolina Coastal Resources Commissioner presented a report that outlined the possibility that sea levels along the coast could rise as much as 39 inches over the next 100 years. Reaction from local land managers and developers was quick and overwhelmingly negative. The General Assembly passed a law forbidding communities from using the report to pass new rules.

And then, Colbert happened.

North Carolina was ridiculed by news aggregators, traditional media, on social media and in op-eds. Now, almost three years later, the scientists have come back with a new report. It still predicts that sea levels will rise, but since it only looks 30 years out, the amount of rise is not anywhere near the levels predicted in the first report.

The changes made it much more palatable to the people who fought against the original.
http://wunc.org/post/state-outlawed-climate-change-accepts-latest-sea-level-rise-report


Here’s the hilarious Stephen Colbert piece from 2012:
http://www.cc.com/video-clips/w6itwj/the-colbert-report-the-word---sink-or-swim
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

AbruptSLR

  • ASIF Emperor
  • Posts: 12960
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #314 on: September 04, 2017, 04:56:01 PM »
The relatively high economic losses from Hurricanes Harvey, Katrina and Sandy, are indicative of the fact that almost all US infrastructure is not built to withstand climate change, because policy makers get very little sustained political  pressure to up-grade that infrastructure.  Greens say that upgrading US infrastructure is a waste of money that would be better spent on reducing GHG emissions.  Climate skeptics say that upgrading US infrastructure will take away from economic growth.  Independents want government to shrink which means less money for infrastructure. 

In the meantime climate change damage to both people and the infrastructure is rapidly increasing. As Donald Trump would say: "Sad".

Title: "Insurance industry prices warming into Hurricane Harvey cost"

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/sep/01/insurance-industry-prices-warming-into-hurricane-harvey-cost

Extract: "Because US infrastructure is not built to withstand climate change the cost of the disaster will be relatively high

Hurricane Katrina in 2005 was “the first taste of a bitter cup that will be proffered to us over and over again,” according to former US vice president Al Gore at the time.
Since then, Hurricane Sandy in 2012 and now Hurricane Harvey have borne out this prediction. The latest storm may turn out to be less fatal than Katrina, which killed more than 1,800 people but in economic terms it may be as bad. Hurricane Katrina cost about $160bn (£124bn) in economic losses in today’s terms, accounting for the last decade’s inflation, while Sandy wrought about $70bn in damage.  Preliminary estimates for the damage caused by Harvey are wide apart, spanning $90bn to $190bn, reflecting the difficulty of judging an unfolding disaster."
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

Bob Wallace

  • ASIF Upper Class
  • Posts: 2166
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #315 on: September 04, 2017, 07:12:36 PM »
It seems to me that we have to both harden our infrastructure and reduce carbon use.

We've already caused enough climate change to create Houstin floods and rising seas causing saltwater intrusion into freshwater supplies in South Miami along with frequently flooded streets.

A good first step would be to stop rebuilding in places which are flooded out.  Those people repairing their houses because they can't sell their house and no one will buy it?  Buy them out and remove the shell of their house.  Let that area be used for parks, agriculture, or wildlife.  We need to retreat to higher ground.

And we need to greatly increase our energy use in the replacement buildings.  Get as close to energy neutral as feasible.  Lots of insolation.  Solar roofs.

Sigmetnow

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 9355
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #316 on: September 08, 2017, 03:45:00 AM »
U.S.:  Senate panel votes to fund UN climate agency
A Senate committee voted Thursday to contribute $10 million to the United Nations’ climate change agency.

The Senate Appropriations Committee voted 16 to 14 to approve an amendment by Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) to restore funding for the U.N.’s Framework Convention on Climate Change in the State Department appropriations bill.

The payments that the United States had made annually since joining the convention in 1992 had been slated to be eliminated.

Merkley said at the committee meeting Thursday to vote on the bill that the amendment “fits in with Secretary [Rex] Tillerson’s desire that we both continue to monitor the changes in the world’s climate and that we keep a seat at the table.”

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) also spoke in support of the amendment.

“This is important,” she said. “You know, the world’s at risk.” ...
http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/349693-senate-panel-votes-to-fund-un-climate-agency
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 9355
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #317 on: September 12, 2017, 12:50:28 PM »
Twitter thread.  Should (U.S.) climate change discussion simply ignore the deniers?

Idea that climate reporting/discussion should aim to reach people who've tribally embraced denialism is itself a major problem in the field.
https://twitter.com/AlexSteffen/status/907308612116029440
...


tl;dr You simply can't do good climate journalism if you're concerned about what climate denialists in your audience think of your coverage.
https://twitter.com/alexsteffen/status/907327812222070784

Image: start of thread.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Bob Wallace

  • ASIF Upper Class
  • Posts: 2166
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #318 on: September 12, 2017, 06:56:30 PM »
Ignore climate change deniers?  We can't always to that but we certainly should minimize the attention we give them.  And we should point out that climate change deniers, like those who believe the Sun orbits the Earth or that evolution does not occur are simply scientifically illiterate.


AbruptSLR

  • ASIF Emperor
  • Posts: 12960
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #319 on: September 25, 2017, 05:09:43 PM »
Changing denialist behavior requires getting inside their heads:

Title: "Why Hard Facts Aren't Enough to Alter Our Beliefs"

https://www.nbcnews.com/better/health/why-hard-facts-aren-t-enough-alter-our-beliefs-ncna803946

Extract: "If we want to affect the behaviors and beliefs of the person in front of us, we need to understand what goes on inside their head."
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

Sigmetnow

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 9355
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #320 on: September 28, 2017, 07:27:37 PM »
So can we (the U.S.) talk about climate change now?

Poll: Majority says climate change responsible for severity of hurricanes
More than half of Americans believe that climate change is responsible for the severity of recent hurricanes, according to an ABC News/Washington Post poll published Thursday.

The survey found that 55 percent of respondents blamed climate change for the rough 2017 hurricane season, while 41 percent said it was "just the kind of severe weather that happens from time to time."

The result is a big change from the same poll 12 years ago, which found that 39 percent blamed climate change and 54 percent blamed random severe weather for the hurricanes of the time. The 2005 poll was taken shortly after Hurricane Katrina wreaked havoc on New Orleans.
...
http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/352849-poll-majority-says-climate-change-is-responsible-for-severity-of
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 9355
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #321 on: September 28, 2017, 09:53:49 PM »
Weather extremes, fossil fuel pollution cost US $240 billion: study
(Reuters) - Weather extremes and air pollution from burning fossil fuels cost the United States $240 billion a year in the past decade, according to a report on Wednesday that urged President Donald Trump to do more to combat climate change.

This year is likely to be the most expensive on record with an estimated $300 billion in losses from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria and a spate of wildfires in western states in the past two months, it said.

"The evidence is undeniable: the more fossil fuels we burn, the faster the climate continues to change," leading scientists wrote in the study published by the non-profit Universal Ecological Fund.

Costs to human health from air pollution caused by fossil fuels averaged $188 billion a year over the past decade, it estimated, while losses from weather extremes such as droughts, heat waves and floods averaged $52 billion. ...
http://uk.mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/idUKKCN1C22AM
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

AbruptSLR

  • ASIF Emperor
  • Posts: 12960
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #322 on: October 06, 2017, 06:27:53 PM »
The linked reference indicates that great challenge w.r.t. achieving optimal GHG emission policies is uncertainties about the implementability of policies to reduce such emissions; and thus it recommends introducing more such emission reduction policies in order to make-up for the ones that will not be implemented:

Botta, N., Jansson, P., and Ionescu, C.: The impact of uncertainty on optimal emission policies, Earth Syst. Dynam. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/esd-2017-86, in review, 2017.

https://www.earth-syst-dynam-discuss.net/esd-2017-86/

Abstract. We apply a computational framework for specifying and solving sequential decision problems to study the impact of three kinds of uncertainties on optimal emission policies in a stylized sequential emission problem. We find that uncertainties about the implementability of decisions on emission reductions (or increases) have a greater impact on optimal policies than uncertainties about the availability of effective emission reduction technologies and uncertainties about the implications of trespassing critical cumulated emission thresholds. The results show that uncertainties about the implementability of decisions on emission reductions (or increases) call for more precautionary policies. In other words, delaying emission reductions to the point in time when effective technologies will become available is sub-optimal when these uncertainties are accounted for rigorously. By contrast, uncertainties about the implications of exceeding critical cumulated emission thresholds tend to make early emission reductions less rewarding.
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

Sigmetnow

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 9355
    • View Profile
Re: What's New in Climate Change Acceptance and Action
« Reply #323 on: October 08, 2017, 07:51:30 PM »
When what's new is old: a look back at Rolling Stone magazine's coverage of the planet.

50th Anniversary Flashback: Reporting the World's Biggest Environmental Stories
From oil spills and nuclear waste to climate change, covering the environment has long been a crucial part of the magazine's mission
http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/news/climate-change-oil-spills-nuclear-waste-50th-anniversary-w505603
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.