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numerobis

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #150 on: April 10, 2018, 11:42:52 PM »
Airlines use hub-and-spoke to save money over point-to-point connections, despite the higher fuel costs. It lets them use bigger planes, which are cheaper in capital, staff, and landing slots. Reducing fuel cost wouldn’t push towards point-to-point, but away.

oren

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #151 on: April 11, 2018, 03:08:02 AM »
Clearly the first business case should not be replacing the train or regular commercial flights, at least with current limitations, and considering air-crew and other costs. It should be replacing flights of very small short-haul airplanes.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #152 on: April 12, 2018, 09:56:32 PM »
SpaceX’s president and COO Gwynne Shotwell says we’ll be able to take a rocket to Shanghai — or Mars — ‘within a decade’
Halfway across the globe in about half an hour.
Quote
Last year, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk got a lot of attention for a video proposing city-to-city travel — on Earth — using a rocket that’s designed for outer space.

Today, speaking at the TED Conference in Vancouver, SpaceX president and chief operating officer Gwynne Shotwell reiterated the company’s plans, pledging that the technology will be ready and operational “within a decade, for sure.”

“It’s definitely going to happen,” she said, interviewed onstage by TED’s Chris Anderson. The company also hopes to fly to Mars by then.

A lot can (and probably will) change in a decade. But the idea is that a very large rocket, capable of carrying about 100 people, could fly like an aircraft and do point-to-point travel on Earth much faster than a plane — halfway across the globe in about 30 to 40 minutes, Shotwell said, landing on a pad five to 10 kilometers outside of a city center.

Shotwell estimated the ticket cost would be somewhere between economy and business class on a plane — so, likely in the thousands of dollars for transoceanic travel. “But you do it in an hour.”

“I’m personally invested in this one,” she said, “because I travel a lot, and I do not love to travel. And I would love to get to see my customers in Riyadh, leave in the morning and be back in time to make dinner.”

How could travel by rocket cost so little? Shotwell said the efficiency would come from being fast enough to be able to operate a route a dozen or so times a day, whereas a long-haul airplane often only does one flight per day.

(Shotwell shared no details on seat design, in-flight amenities or how many barf bags we’ll need per person.)
https://www.recode.net/2018/4/11/17227036/flight-spacex-gwynne-shotwell-space-ted-conference-interview

And this:
SpaceX’s valuation is expected to climb to $24 billion
At the new mark, SpaceX would be the third-highest-valued private company in the United States.
https://www.recode.net/2018/4/12/17229542/spacex-rocket-space-valuation-elon-musk-fundraising
« Last Edit: April 12, 2018, 10:03:42 PM by Sigmetnow »
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TerryM

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #153 on: April 12, 2018, 10:02:38 PM »
SpaceX’s president and COO Gwynne Shotwell says we’ll be able to take a rocket to Shanghai — or Mars — ‘within a decade’


Is this a Tesla Decade, or ten years?
Terry ;)

Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #154 on: April 12, 2018, 10:08:47 PM »
SpaceX’s president and COO Gwynne Shotwell says we’ll be able to take a rocket to Shanghai — or Mars — ‘within a decade’


Is this a Tesla Decade, or ten years?
Terry ;)

Apparently during the TED talk they do discuss “Elon Time.” ;D

Quote
Fundamental risk reduction for humanity. Gwynne Shotwell has one of the most amazing jobs on the planet — she was employee #7 at SpaceX and is now the company’s president. In conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson, Shotwell discusses what inspired her to pursue a career in engineering, how she drove SpaceX’s partnership with NASA, the company’s race to be the next company to put people into orbit and what it’s like to work with Elon Musk — including the concept of Elon time. After discussing SpaceX’s design process, including their reusable rockets (something no national space program has been able to achieve) as well as a semi-secretive project to put a constellation of satellites into low-Earth orbit to cover the planet in internet (at an estimated cost of $10 billion), Shotwell took some time to dream a little. She detailed SpaceX’s next big project: the BFR, or Big Falcon Rocket — which will be about two-and-a-half times the size of Falcon Heavy, the giant rocket they flew earlier this year (the one that delivered a Tesla roadster to space). BFR is what you need to take humanity to Mars, for sure — but it has a “residual capability,” as Gywnne puts it: rocket travel here on Earth. The plan is to fly BFR like an aircraft, doing point-to-point travel, taking off from New York City or Vancouver and flying halfway across the globe in roughly 40 minutes. Anderson says incredulously: “This is never going to happen!” and Gwynne shoots back:  “Oh no, it’s definitely going to happen” — and within a decade. The timeframe for landing humans on Mars looks about the same, she says, since both projects are built on the same technology. And to the question of why, with all the problems here on earth, SpaceX has their eyes on the stars, Shotwell has a vision: “This is the first step to us moving to other solar systems and potentially other galaxies,” she says. “This is the only time I out-vision Elon: I want to meet people, or whatever they call themselves, in another solar system.”
https://blog.ted.com/nerdish-delight-notes-from-session-3-of-ted2018/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #155 on: May 02, 2018, 05:30:13 PM »
Now certified in the U.S.:

First all-electric trainer plane gets airworthiness certification from the FAA in the US
Quote
It follows certification in Australia and Canada. Now U.S. flight schools will be able to operate the aircraft.

The company says that the plane can stay in the air for an hour, with an extra 30 minutes in reserve.

Ivo Boscarol, CEO of Pipistrel, says:

“With the ever growing cost of fuel it is time to rethink pilot training. Our solution is the first practical all-electric trainer! Technologies developed specially for this aircraft cut the cost of ab-initio pilot training by as much as 70%, making flying more affordable than ever before. Being able to conduct training on smaller airfields closer to towns with zero C02 emissions and minimum noise is also a game changer! Alpha Electro meets microlight and ASTM LSA criteria, as well as standards for electric propulsion. Alpha Electro is our 5th electric aircraft project and the second to result as a commercial product.”

They claim an extremely low cost of operation (~$3 per flight at $0.15 per kWh) and the battery pack can be charged fairly quickly thanks to its small size. It can also be swapped for rapid turnaround. The batteries in this plane are expected to be viable for roughly 1000 flying hours. ...
https://electrek.co/2018/04/27/all-electric-trainer-plane-airworthiness-certification-faa-us/
Article includes a video.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #156 on: May 13, 2018, 08:22:34 PM »
A radical way to cut emissions – ration everyone’s flights
Quote
Everyone could be given an air mile allowance – say enough for one long-haul return flight a year, or three short-haul flights, so people with families on the other side of the world could see them once a year. If you don’t want to use your allowance, you could sell it off in a government-regulated online marketplace. If you’re keen to do a holiday a month, you’ll have to buy your allowance from someone else.

This would be far preferable to increasing tax on airline tickets. It would be redistributive: everyone gets a certain number of air miles, but if you’d rather get the thousands of pounds you could command for them on the online marketplace, you’re free to sell them. Same if you’re just not that bothered about going abroad. But if you want to go over your allowance, it will be at a cost. ...
https://amp.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/may/09/cut-emissions-flights-air-travel-flying
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magnamentis

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #157 on: May 13, 2018, 10:50:19 PM »
A radical way to cut emissions – ration everyone’s flights
Quote
Everyone could be given an air mile allowance – say enough for one long-haul return flight a year, or three short-haul flights, so people with families on the other side of the world could see them once a year. If you don’t want to use your allowance, you could sell it off in a government-regulated online marketplace. If you’re keen to do a holiday a month, you’ll have to buy your allowance from someone else.

This would be far preferable to increasing tax on airline tickets. It would be redistributive: everyone gets a certain number of air miles, but if you’d rather get the thousands of pounds you could command for them on the online marketplace, you’re free to sell them. Same if you’re just not that bothered about going abroad. But if you want to go over your allowance, it will be at a cost. ...
https://amp.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/may/09/cut-emissions-flights-air-travel-flying

that's a great approach / idea. sounds extreme first to many but i believe that air-travel could be cut down to a third without a negative impact on general business ( except airline business of course )

this is blowing the same horn like reducing speed of cargo vessels combines with wind power and other supporting secondary power supplies. in one word, the world has to learn efficiency not only in making money and producing new things, but as well in spending money and keeping existing products functioning ( short produckt live cycles / planned obsolescence etc. are horrible resource and power hogs IMO )

just one of millions of examples. there is no good reason to replace a samsung S8 with a Samsung S9 smartphone except bragging rights which is indeed fueling so many markets and is one of the worst reasons to buy something. Nothing against nice things but then they should at least make minimum sense. ( i talk about replacement, nothing against nice new stuff when needed )

i for one started to repair my stuff as long as they work like before once repaired and don't look a chowed by a cow.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #158 on: May 16, 2018, 01:42:08 PM »
SpaceX COO Gwynne Shotwell’s TED talk is up.

BFR flights half way around the world in less than an hour, for less than a business class airline ticket.  Because the BFR can make many of those trips a day, whereas an airliner can only make one.
Also discussed:  “Elon time.”  :D  The SpaceX internet satellite constellation, and addressing the problem of space debris.

https://www.ted.com/talks/gwynne_shotwell_spacex_s_plan_to_fly_you_across_the_globe_in_30_minutes

Elon Musk tweeted a footnote:
“Boring Company Hyperloop will take you from city center under ground & ocean to spaceport in 10 to 15 mins”
https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/996691566851801088

Because sealing tunnels against the water table requires them to be built to withstand 5 or 6 atmospheres, but a vacuum only requires the tunnel to withstand 1 atmosphere.  From 2017 (and somewhat outdated already):
https://www.ted.com/talks/elon_musk_the_future_we_re_building_and_boring

« Last Edit: May 16, 2018, 01:51:38 PM by Sigmetnow »
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Bob Wallace

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #159 on: May 16, 2018, 04:30:34 PM »
Quote
sealing tunnels against the water table requires them to be built to withstand 5 or 6 atmospheres, but a vacuum only requires the tunnel to withstand 1 atmosphere

Whoa, doggie!

If so, the only issue now is cost.  If tunnels can operate at a near vacuum putting the Hyperloop underground solves multiple problems.

Thermal expansion.  None.

Rupture of tube due to 'bad actor', vehicle crashing into pillar, airplane crashing into elevated tube.

Land acquisition for route.

Opposition for aesthetic reasons.

And Elon has said that riding the slow speed (150 MPH) rapid subway version will cost less than riding the city bus.   Faster and cheaper than flying?  Bye, planes.

I'm copying this over to the Hyperloop thread which is where the discussion probably belongs.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #160 on: May 21, 2018, 09:55:54 PM »
Zunum Aero strikes deal with JetSuite — a partner of JetBlue Airways — for debut of hybrid electric airplanes in 2022
Quote
Zunum Aero is working on a hybrid-electric aircraft propulsion system that’s expected to transition to all-electric once battery technology makes it possible. The system will be optimized to fly distances of up to 1,000 miles and make use of more than 5,000 underutilized regional airports in the U.S. ...
https://www.geekwire.com/2018/zunum-aero-strikes-deal-jetsuite-debut-hybrid-electric-airplanes/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #161 on: May 22, 2018, 05:26:53 PM »
May soon need to change this thread to “Aviation and Space,” as off-planet activities increasingly affect life here on earth.

How Elon Musk's rocket company SpaceX beat Boeing to become a $28 billion aerospace juggernaut
Quote
SpaceX is the No. 1 company on the 2018 CNBC Disruptor 50 list, announced Tuesday.

... In 2019, Musk believes SpaceX will be completing "short trips" for its Mars rocket system, while also beginning to roll out its constellation of 4,425 satellites. It is in the next stage of Musk's master plan to put 1 million people on the Red Planet to ensure the survival of the human race in the event of a world war or catastrophe on Earth.
...
SpaceX began 2018 the way it ended 2017: Batting a thousand. Called by some as "the dawn of the entrepreneurial space age," last year saw SpaceX complete 18 rocket launches successfully, including when it became the first in history to launch and land two rockets within 48 hours. The space company also made NASA history, becoming the first to launch a supply mission to the International Space Station on a reused rocket. ...
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/22/spacex-leading-the-space-race-to-launch-humans-to-mars.html
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numerobis

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #162 on: May 22, 2018, 06:32:21 PM »
Space isn’t yet relevant for energy use worldwide.

Some rockets run off hydrogen, which could be sourced from water; but most run off kerosene which will require fixing.

Given Musk’s Mars fixation, he’s working on engines that burn methanol, which not coincidentally can easily be synthesized from low-partial-pressure carbon dioxide and water (it just takes lots of electricity).

TerryM

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #163 on: May 22, 2018, 07:27:03 PM »
SpaceX will be delivering the new GRACE-FO's in a few hours. An hour after that my pulse rate should be back to normal.


The DoD scrubbed it's GPS launch yesterday after deciding it needed more time to study and approve the SpaceX rocket that was supposed to make that launch. This news hasn't eased my nerves. I'm aware that it's the block 5 that's being questioned, not the block 4 that's launching the GRACE's, but the block 5 is billed as a safer, stronger replacement for block 4.
If block 4 needs a safer stronger replacement then why are they entrusting it to ferry these irreplaceable satellites into orbit?


Sorry, I'll be OK by 4:30 EDT ???
Terry

Bob Wallace

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #164 on: May 22, 2018, 07:33:55 PM »
Space isn’t yet relevant for energy use worldwide.

Some rockets run off hydrogen, which could be sourced from water; but most run off kerosene which will require fixing.

Given Musk’s Mars fixation, he’s working on engines that burn methanol, which not coincidentally can easily be synthesized from low-partial-pressure carbon dioxide and water (it just takes lots of electricity).

Does anyone have some idea of the infrastructure cost for generating hydrogen from water?   Might it be cheap enough to allow H2 plants to run as dispatchable loads?  If so, then the cost of electricity is less of an issue.

There's an interesting development in which an organism has been found that can live in a hydrogen rich environment and 'fart' methane.  That looks like it might be a low cost second stage process.  I don't know how the methane would be sorted out.

ghoti

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #165 on: May 22, 2018, 10:32:49 PM »
Terry good news! You can relax now knowing GRACE-FO has been delivered safely to orbit. I'm am excited about once again getting the gravity data again. Pity it will take 6 months or so to get everything up and running and calibrated.

The GRACE data has been a huge tool for understanding climate change and sea level rise.

confirmation of success:
https://twitter.com/ChrisG_NSF/status/999025317720285186
« Last Edit: May 22, 2018, 10:39:24 PM by ghoti »

TerryM

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #166 on: May 22, 2018, 11:33:47 PM »
Thanks ghoti
I've been watching on another channel & I'm delighted that everything went without a hitch.
I probably worried just a bit more than I should have.
Can't wait for the data to begin flowing again!
Terry

Sleepy

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #167 on: June 08, 2018, 09:04:33 AM »
Hmm, why am I thinking of Statler and Waldorf here?

Heathrow Airport: Cabinet approves new runway plan
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-44357580
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #168 on: June 08, 2018, 08:26:07 PM »
Hmm, why am I thinking of Statler and Waldorf here?

Heathrow Airport: Cabinet approves new runway plan
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-44357580

One option to building additional runways at crowded city airports is to provide fast transportation to/from other nearby, less used airports....

https://twitter.com/FutureTravelX/status/1004313360421310464
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Bob Wallace

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #169 on: June 08, 2018, 08:56:01 PM »
Hmm, why am I thinking of Statler and Waldorf here?

Heathrow Airport: Cabinet approves new runway plan
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-44357580

One option to building additional runways at crowded city airports is to provide fast transportation to/from other nearby, less used airports....

https://twitter.com/FutureTravelX/status/1004313360421310464

Fast transportation to less used airports = Loop.

josh-j

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #170 on: June 09, 2018, 11:32:58 PM »
One option to building additional runways at crowded city airports is to provide fast transportation to/from other nearby, less used airports....

https://twitter.com/FutureTravelX/status/1004313360421310464

Another option is to fly less (particularly frequent fliers), and build less. That seems more sensible than building new infrastructure in order to encourage more aviation growth incompatible even with existing climate goals.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #171 on: June 09, 2018, 11:55:37 PM »
Sensible is a hard sell. 

Sleepy

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #172 on: June 10, 2018, 12:05:12 PM »
One option to building additional runways at crowded city airports is to provide fast transportation to/from other nearby, less used airports....

https://twitter.com/FutureTravelX/status/1004313360421310464

Another option is to fly less (particularly frequent fliers), and build less. That seems more sensible than building new infrastructure in order to encourage more aviation growth incompatible even with existing climate goals.
That would be the best option IMHO, josh-j. Which is also why there's an increasing number of people today who has decided to stop flying. Tourism is large part of Swedish emissions, but hasn't been well quantified.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-018-0141-x
Quote
Tourism contributes significantly to global gross domestic product, and is forecast to grow at an annual 4%, thus outpacing many other economic sectors. However, global carbon emissions related to tourism are currently not well quantified. Here, we quantify tourism-related global carbon flows between 160 countries, and their carbon footprints under origin and destination accounting perspectives. We find that, between 2009 and 2013, tourism’s global carbon footprint has increased from 3.9 to 4.5 GtCO2e, four times more than previously estimated, accounting for about 8% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Transport, shopping and food are significant contributors. The majority of this footprint is exerted by and in high-income countries. The rapid increase in tourism demand is effectively outstripping the decarbonization of tourism-related technology. We project that, due to its high carbon intensity and continuing growth, tourism will constitute a growing part of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.
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Bob Wallace

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #173 on: June 10, 2018, 06:46:13 PM »
Quote
Another option is to fly less (particularly frequent fliers), and build less.

How does one get past the "Gosh, it would be great if..." phase and actually reduce air travel? 

How about building less?

Got solution?

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #174 on: June 11, 2018, 11:49:24 PM »

How does one get past the "Gosh, it would be great if..." phase and actually reduce air travel? 

How about building less?

Got solution?

I sure do have a solution. Let's raise the cost of flying, preferably through carbon pricing. Similarly, as the price of cement and bitumen rises with carbon taxation, fewer runways will be built.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #175 on: June 11, 2018, 11:56:15 PM »
Cool.

Now tell us how we get a federal price on carbon in the US.

I love solutions.  Especially those that stand some chance of working....

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #176 on: June 12, 2018, 02:15:19 AM »
... Now tell us how we get a federal price on carbon in the US.
I love solutions.  Especially those that stand some chance of working....
In the good ol' U.S. of A., I think this leads to the litigation thread (I mean Legal Approach to Climate Change Resolutions)
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Bob Wallace

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #177 on: June 12, 2018, 03:53:19 AM »
It's not only the good ol' USA.  Solar has met governmental restrictions in Spain where coal basically shut down any new solar, even had people taking panels off their roofs, for a couple of days.  The coal industry has carried out a fair amount of opposition in Germany and Australia.  And the UK is will to spend multiple times more for nuclear than to install wind and solar.

Sebastian Jones

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #178 on: June 12, 2018, 06:17:47 AM »
Cool.

Now tell us how we get a federal price on carbon in the US.

I love solutions.  Especially those that stand some chance of working....
But in California you do have a price on carbon- it is a cap and trade system instead of a carbon tax.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #179 on: June 12, 2018, 06:48:45 AM »
California isn't the entire country. 

Put a big price on carbon in CA and we could see planes fueling up in Arizona and then flying to LA to board passengers.
--

All that's a bit tongue in cheek.  A worldwide or nationwide carbon tax would help drive things faster but I don't see much of a chance of large scale carbon taxes.  At least until climate pain gets a lot worse.


Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #180 on: June 14, 2018, 05:27:04 PM »
 ;D :o 8) ::)  Outlandish.  But a decade or two ago, so were self-driving cars. 

Boeing Asked for Quiet Jetpacks and Got a Bunch of Air Motorcycles
Want to strap on a backpack and fly? It’s going to be very loud.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-06-14/boeing-asked-for-quiet-jetpacks-and-got-a-bunch-of-air-motorcycles
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numerobis

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #181 on: June 15, 2018, 02:37:27 AM »
California isn't the entire country. 

Put a big price on carbon in CA and we could see planes fueling up in Arizona and then flying to LA to board passengers.
--

All that's a bit tongue in cheek.  A worldwide or nationwide carbon tax would help drive things faster but I don't see much of a chance of large scale carbon taxes.  At least until climate pain gets a lot worse.

Air transport of fuel is more than 100x the cost by pipeline. You can’t cheaply fly in your fuel.

Instead it would drive Californians to take a train (or a self-driving electric car) to Nevada and fly from there, particularly for crossing the Pacific.

That would mean less pollution in California. It could get votes.

Sebastian Jones

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #182 on: June 15, 2018, 05:27:32 PM »
California isn't the entire country. 

Put a big price on carbon in CA and we could see planes fueling up in Arizona and then flying to LA to board passengers.
--

All that's a bit tongue in cheek.  A worldwide or nationwide carbon tax would help drive things faster but I don't see much of a chance of large scale carbon taxes.  At least until climate pain gets a lot worse.


California may not be the entire country, however were it to be considered a single nation it would rank as a member of the G8/9 (depending on if Russia is re-instated). Its economy is larger than Canada's. California matters.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #183 on: June 15, 2018, 06:15:23 PM »

Your solution to decreasing carbon emissions from flying -

Quote
I sure do have a solution. Let's raise the cost of flying, preferably through carbon pricing. Similarly, as the price of cement and bitumen rises with carbon taxation, fewer runways will be built.

I have yet to hear we create a US wide and a global price on carbon that will decrease flying.

Put a large enough price on carbon in CA and airlines will shift their practices to avoid those costs.  For example, transoceanic flights might no longer depart from CA.  Passengers might be shuttled to a nearby state or country with no carbon price and the do the long flight from there.


Sleepy

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #184 on: June 15, 2018, 08:25:28 PM »
https://ec.europa.eu/clima/policies/transport/aviation_en
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Someone flying from London to New York and back generates roughly the same level of emissions as the average person in the EU does by heating their home for a whole year.

By 2020, global international aviation emissions are projected to be around 70% higher than in 2005 and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) forecasts that by 2050 they could grow by a further 300-700%.

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CO2 emissions from aviation have been included in the EU emissions trading system (EU ETS) since 2012. Under the EU ETS, all airlines operating in Europe, European and non-European alike, are required to monitor, report and verify their emissions, and to surrender allowances against those emissions. They receive tradeable allowances covering a certain level of emissions from their flights per year.

The system has so far contributed to reducing the carbon footprint of the aviation sector by more than 17 million tonnes per year, with compliance covering over 99.5% of emissions.

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The legislation, adopted in 2008, was designed to apply to emissions from flights from, to and within the European Economic Area (EEA) – the 28 EU Member States, plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. The European Court of Justice has confirmed that this approach is compatible with international law.

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During the period 2021-2035, and based on expected participation, the scheme is estimated to offset around 80% of the emissions above 2020 levels. This is because participation in the first phases is voluntary for states, and there are exemptions for those with low aviation activity. All EU countries will join the scheme from the start.

Better step it up, some must be grounded by law and taxes. Obviously they won't like it.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #185 on: June 17, 2018, 10:07:30 PM »
”Superjumbo sales have weakened as carriers opt for twin-engine wide-bodies that burn less fuel. Were they resold to another operator, the planes might be expected to fly for at least another decade.”

Two Unwanted A380s Are Moving Closer to the Scrapheap
Unwanted superjumbos set to be taken apart for components
British Airways and others decided not to buy double-deckers
https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2018-06-05/first-a380s-poised-for-scrapheap-as-second-hand-interest-fades
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numerobis

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #186 on: June 18, 2018, 12:31:35 AM »
Not just the A380, but all 4-engine aircraft are doomed. Turbines are more efficient the larger they are; and engineering is now good enough to safely fly across the ocean on a single engine if one fails.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #187 on: June 19, 2018, 05:24:11 PM »
Pipistrel Alpha Electro

“Norway’s first electric flight carried out today! Pilot: ⁦Avinor ⁩ CEO Dag Falk-Petersen. Passenger: Minister of Transport Ketil Solvik-Olsen. ...”
https://mobile.twitter.com/olavml/status/1008750859772219393
Image below.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #188 on: June 21, 2018, 09:04:36 PM »
Next Generation SolarStratos Plane, carries one or two pilots.

This 32kW plane will fly twice as high as commercial jets on SunPower
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Wingspan: 24.8 meters – about 81 feet, or the length of two standard city buses
Weight: 450 kilograms – about as heavy as a grand piano; to make SolarStratos its lightest, the cabin will not be pressurized, requiring pilots to wear astronaut suits that are pressurized by solar energy.
Engine: 32-kilowatt electrical engine, about one-third the size of what would power an electric vehicle
Energy: 22 square meters of SunPower Maxeon solar cells, each reaching 22 to 24 percent efficiency
Batteries: One 20-kilowatt lithium ion battery
Autonomy: Self-generates electricity with solar to power the plane for more than 12 hours
https://electrek.co/2018/06/20/this-32kw-plane-will-fly-twice-as-high-as-commercial-jets-on-sunpower/


Looks like the successor to Solar Impulse 2, the 2.3 tonnes (5,100 lb, little more than an average SUV), 71.9 m (236 ft) wingspan, solar-powered plane that flew around the world in 2015/2016, staying aloft for days at a time.  Its service ceiling was 8,500 m (27,900 ft) with a maximum altitude of 12,000 metres (39,000 ft).  It was unpressurized and could carry only one pilot.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #189 on: July 03, 2018, 06:10:30 PM »
Tweeted June 30, 2018. 

“Flightradar24 on Twitter: "Yesterday was the busiest day of the year in the skies so far and our busiest day ever. 202,157 flights tracked! The first time we've tracked more than 200,000 flights in a single day....”
https://mobile.twitter.com/flightradar24/status/1013088775973556224
Image below; GIF at the link.

Not the statistic we would like to see....  However, many of the Twitter replies mention carbon, CO2, and climate change, so the realization of the problem is spreading.

Note that FlightRadar24 can only track flights with a certain type of transponder, and which are within range of receivers, so not every flight was recorded.  Replies to the tweet have links explaining how thier system works and why some flights “disappear” from the GIF.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #190 on: July 11, 2018, 03:58:39 PM »
wut?

Flying Trains Could Be Coming Your Way
- French firm has designed an airplane with removable wings
- It’s presenting plane to Boeing, Asia to cut Europe dependence
Quote
It sounds like something Q, the tech guy in James Bond movies, would create: A plane that lands on a runway, shrugs its wings off, turns into a train and rolls on to rails to drop you off at your local station.

That’s what a French entrepreneur, who’s made millions by connecting engineers with industrial groups, is pitching to Boeing Co. and others. "Link & Fly" is Akka Technologies’s new flagship aircraft design, with wings that come off to hasten turnover at airports and make boarding easier and closer to passengers’ homes. ...
https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2018-07-11/flying-trains-france-s-akka-technologies-makes-pitch-to-boeing
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TerryM

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #191 on: July 11, 2018, 06:15:40 PM »
wut?

Flying Trains Could Be Coming Your Way
- French firm has designed an airplane with removable wings
- It’s presenting plane to Boeing, Asia to cut Europe dependence
Quote
It sounds like something Q, the tech guy in James Bond movies, would create: A plane that lands on a runway, shrugs its wings off, turns into a train and rolls on to rails to drop you off at your local station.

That’s what a French entrepreneur, who’s made millions by connecting engineers with industrial groups, is pitching to Boeing Co. and others. "Link & Fly" is Akka Technologies’s new flagship aircraft design, with wings that come off to hasten turnover at airports and make boarding easier and closer to passengers’ homes. ...
https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2018-07-11/flying-trains-france-s-akka-technologies-makes-pitch-to-boeing


... - Then from the "train station" the individual seat sections break themselves out and in a driverless cab manner whisk each family safely home to their own robotic secured and maintained triple gated community.


In the near future those that can afford it will be able to experience world wide travel and adventure tourism without once requiring them to be in close proximity to those less economically or culturally fortunate.
Terry

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #192 on: July 11, 2018, 07:24:41 PM »
And during their world tour they won't have to touch dirty soil or be tempted by foreign water (different from their favorite Fiji, Icelandic or French source).  And customs will be a breeze if they can show they never left their personal pod!
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #193 on: July 11, 2018, 08:34:16 PM »
Seems a silly idea, but... loading an electric “bus” at a population center would prevent the emissions of individual vehicles driving to the airport.  Upon arrival at the ramp, all people and luggage would already be stowed, so there would be less delay — and they wouldn’t need a gate — meaning more airport operations per hour might be possible.  (Although, usually, runways and required separation of air traffic are the limiting factors.)  Could increase flights without building another terminal.

I assume the bus “tractor” is electric, and would be separated from the passenger pod and remain behind at the airport.  Then, as long as the bus doesn’t become detached from the wings during flight... there you go.  Maybe someday, when all-electric planes use swappable batteries, swapping an entire bus-like module like this might make sense.
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Sleepy

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #194 on: July 12, 2018, 08:26:42 AM »
wut?

Flying Trains Could Be Coming Your Way
- French firm has designed an airplane with removable wings
- It’s presenting plane to Boeing, Asia to cut Europe dependence
Quote
It sounds like something Q, the tech guy in James Bond movies, would create: A plane that lands on a runway, shrugs its wings off, turns into a train and rolls on to rails to drop you off at your local station.

That’s what a French entrepreneur, who’s made millions by connecting engineers with industrial groups, is pitching to Boeing Co. and others. "Link & Fly" is Akka Technologies’s new flagship aircraft design, with wings that come off to hasten turnover at airports and make boarding easier and closer to passengers’ homes. ...
https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2018-07-11/flying-trains-france-s-akka-technologies-makes-pitch-to-boeing


... - Then from the "train station" the individual seat sections break themselves out and in a driverless cab manner whisk each family safely home to their own robotic secured and maintained triple gated community.


In the near future those that can afford it will be able to experience world wide travel and adventure tourism without once requiring them to be in close proximity to those less economically or culturally fortunate.
Terry
That vimeo video by AKKA was amazing, nine rotations per day instead of seven. Because of the increased traffic congestion that might bring, maybe we should also consider how to get those pods onto a passing Vogon spacecraft?
Also adding a spaceship size comparison, couldn't find a Vogon ship but the ISS was there, top left yellow box! Image is 4268x5690 pixels and failed to upload so here's a hotlink. :)

« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 08:33:43 AM by Sleepy »
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #195 on: July 12, 2018, 10:14:55 PM »
Silicon Valley startup unveils BlackFly, the latest entrant in race to field a flying car
Quote
A Silicon Valley startup called Opener is taking the wraps off a single-seat, all-electric flying vehicle known as BlackFly, which the company says will require no formal licensing in the U.S.

“The future of aviation begins today,” Alan Eustace, a former Google executive (and record-setting free-fall skyjumper) who is now a director at Opener, said in a news release. “The dream of flight, which was so difficult and expensive to obtain, will soon be within the reach of millions. Opener is putting the fun back into flying and opening up a new world of possibilities.”

Opener says a developmental version of the tandem-wing, eight-rotor craft has gone into the air more than 1,400 times, with the total distance flown exceeding 12,000 miles.

...Leng said Opener is aiming to put BlackFly on the market next year for the “price of an SUV.”

Opener said BlackFly is designed primarily to operate from small grassy areas and can travel distances of up to 25 miles at a speed of 62 mph, in accordance with U.S. regulatory restrictions. The batteries can be recharged in as little as 25 minutes.
https://www.geekwire.com/2018/silicon-valley-startup-unveils-blackfly-latest-entrant-race-field-flying-car/
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Sleepy

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #196 on: July 13, 2018, 08:29:32 AM »
Enough joking, forgot this one.

‘Green’ fossil fuels to be allowed under latest weakening of UN aviation CO2 scheme

https://www.transportenvironment.org/news/%E2%80%98green%E2%80%99-fossil-fuels-be-allowed-under-latest-weakening-un-aviation-co2-scheme

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A UN scheme being set up to tackle the climate impact of flying will credit airlines that use fossil fuels that have been declared to be ‘green’. The extraordinary concession was pushed through by Saudi Arabia, with the backing of the United States, and means that, for example, airlines burning kerosene could be rewarded with reduced obligations to buy carbon offsets simply because the refinery producing the oil was running on renewable electricity.

A personal and to some, very naive reflection. Considering the imminent danger of climate change there's only one way to deal with this ongoing nonsense and that's grounding all unnecessary flights. Like now.
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