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Author Topic: Places becoming more livable  (Read 10988 times)

Shared Humanity

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Re: Places becoming more livable
« Reply #100 on: October 23, 2020, 07:47:56 PM »
I believe that Co2 emissions will be cut drastically by 2050 (50-80% from today's levels) and eliminated by 2100.

I believe in unicorns and sparkle ponies.

In my opinion, there is actually no evidence of this being likely to occur.

SH, El Cid talked about emissions, and I believe he is correct in that statement.
 Your graph of CO2 ppm in the atm. shows the state variable, whereas emissions are the flow.

Yes. I understand. I simply have less confidence in the accuracy of global emissions data as I do not know how it is calculated. I have far more confidence in a single measure, using a fixed technique.

Do you have a go to site for the global emissions metric?

El Cid

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Re: Places becoming more livable
« Reply #101 on: October 23, 2020, 09:18:19 PM »
I simply have less confidence in the accuracy of global emissions data as I do not know how it is calculated. I have far more confidence in a single measure, using a fixed technique.

Still Co2 levels show stock, emissions show flow. The change in Co2 levels shows something closer to the annual emission numbers (although likely with a lag). Besides, I was talking about the future path of emissions.

Shared Humanity

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Re: Places becoming more livable
« Reply #102 on: October 23, 2020, 09:33:48 PM »
I simply have less confidence in the accuracy of global emissions data as I do not know how it is calculated. I have far more confidence in a single measure, using a fixed technique.

Still Co2 levels show stock, emissions show flow. The change in Co2 levels shows something closer to the annual emission numbers (although likely with a lag). Besides, I was talking about the future path of emissions.

Where do you draw your emissions data?

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming more livable
« Reply #103 on: May 31, 2021, 02:00:09 AM »
New York City's newest park, Little Island, opens to public
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The public park on New York City's Hudson River finally opened on May 21 nearly seven years after plans were unveiled, thanks to billionaire media mogul Barry Diller, whose $260 million donation has further transformed the once-derelict West Side of Manhattan.

The island was built on the pillars of the former Pier 54, connected to Manhattan by a walkway that will take visitors from the trendy Meatpacking District to the site where survivors of the Titanic were taken and from where the Lusitania departed.

The West Side, once dominated by a bustling port, deteriorated into industrial eyesores and homeless camps before a revitalization this century converted much of it into magnificent parkland. ...
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/little-island-new-york-city-trnd/index.html
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wdmn

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Re: Places becoming more livable
« Reply #104 on: May 31, 2021, 02:52:15 AM »
Don't get me wrong, this park ^ is beautiful, but it feels sort of gimmicky.

It has very little usable space. It is more of a place to "go see," and say you've been there than a real useable green space (to sit, or kick a ball, or have a bbq, or a birthday party, etc) for people who live in the area.

Also, because it is "the end of the line," while the path is lovely it seems a bit sterile.

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Places becoming more livable
« Reply #105 on: May 31, 2021, 03:26:18 AM »
A few years ago my daughter who lived in Manhattan for a decade took me for a walk along an old bit of raised rail turned into the High Line Park .  It certainly looked 'contrived', but it was being well used, as I see about 30 people on the Little Island picture above.  Having lived in NYC for a year myself, I cherished my time in parks where no car were 'in your face' - I often used the John Finley Walk to get to work - it was a sidewalk between the FDR Drive and the East River, but it made life in the City more livable.

High Line Park
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming more livable
« Reply #106 on: June 14, 2021, 03:15:37 PM »
How the giant trees got to New York’s new island park
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Little Island, the city’s newest park, is perched over the Hudson River. When it opened, it was full of large, mature trees. What does it take to fill a park out with foliage?

Off the west side of Manhattan, sitting in the Hudson River, is a new New York City public park called Little Island. The $260 million pet project of businessman Barry Diller features 2.4 acres of tree-lined pathways, an amphitheater, and a food court. The idea for Little Island began nearly a decade ago, though it just opened to the public at the end of May. You’d be forgiven for thinking it’s been around longer. The park juts out of the river on concrete tulip-esque columns, and jutting out of the park itself is an array of trees—and not skinny saplings secured with stakes into the ground. These trees look as if they’ve already lived here for some time, and that was by design. …

Creating new, old-looking greenspace within a city isn’t easy.
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“If that tree had not been planted immediately, its roots would dry out and it would suffer,” Nielsen explains. There’s still a chance something could happen to the trees in the park—an infestation, disease, a lightning strike—but luckily they are under a two-year warranty. “The trees are the single-largest investment of the entire landscape, and I think they’re also hugely visually important to the site, so their care and feeding, so to speak, is an extremely high priority.”
https://www.fastcompany.com/90645893/how-the-giant-trees-got-to-new-yorks-new-island-park
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