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Author Topic: Greenland 2018 melt season  (Read 7869 times)

gerontocrat

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #50 on: March 19, 2018, 10:16:06 AM »
https://www.dmi.dk/en/groenland/maalinger/greenland-ice-sheet-surface-mass-budget/

18th March

Greenland precipitation a bit above average on 18th March and probably for next two days.. After that looks like staying pretty dry.

But I'm posting this to show the pink extent in SW Greenland -the most extensive I've seen this year. DMI seems to be not showing this as melt, i.e. it is sublimation.
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gerontocrat

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #51 on: March 20, 2018, 04:49:13 PM »
https://www.dmi.dk/en/groenland/maalinger/greenland-ice-sheet-surface-mass-budget/

19th March

Greenland precipitation a bit above average on 19th March and probably for next one or two days.. After that looks like staying pretty dry.

But I'm posting this to show the pink extent in SW Greenland continues -the most extensive I've seen this year. DMI seems to be not showing this as melt, i.e. it is sublimation.
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gerontocrat

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #52 on: March 23, 2018, 11:53:47 AM »
https://www.dmi.dk/en/groenland/maalinger/greenland-ice-sheet-surface-mass-budget/

22nd March data

Greenland precipitation continues its relentlessly average/below-average season, and  looks like staying that way to the end of March.

Then, GFs says that above zero temperatures will reach SW Greenland as the potential 5th Nor'Easter leaves North America bringing a mixture of snow and rain to Southern Greenland. This could cause the first measurable melting event of 2018.
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Neven

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #53 on: March 24, 2018, 11:00:17 AM »
I saw this map in an Austrian article about Greenland ice. I didn't know Greenland belonged to France:
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gerontocrat

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #54 on: March 24, 2018, 12:23:01 PM »
I saw this map in an Austrian article about Greenland ice. I didn't know Greenland belonged to France:

Not a lot of people know that. Not a good idea to talk about it - a very sensitive issue as yet unresolved (because no-one who resolves these issues has been told there is an issue).

And where did they get that map? Below is what DMI produce, also accumulated SMB from Sep 1 2017 to now..
« Last Edit: March 24, 2018, 12:28:43 PM by gerontocrat »
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ivica

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #55 on: March 24, 2018, 01:16:31 PM »
I saw this map in an Austrian article about Greenland ice. I didn't know Greenland belonged to France:

Hmm, Dutch might disagree ;)

Paddy

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #56 on: March 24, 2018, 08:52:27 PM »
I saw this map in an Austrian article about Greenland ice. I didn't know Greenland belonged to France:

Hmm, Dutch might disagree ;)

I think you mean Danes...

ivica

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #57 on: March 24, 2018, 09:25:28 PM »
I saw this map in an Austrian article about Greenland ice. I didn't know Greenland belonged to France:

Hmm, Dutch might disagree ;)

I think you mean Danes...

No, that is about colors of Dutch flag vs France flag vs Graph. OT as hell, sorry.

Neven

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #58 on: March 24, 2018, 09:54:10 PM »
It appears that an even stranger melting pattern may cause more international chaos:
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gerontocrat

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #59 on: March 24, 2018, 10:06:28 PM »
"EU BROKEN BY GREENLAND DISPUTE"

The European Parliament descended into chaos and violence today when it became known that Ireland has sent an expeditionary force to attempt a fait accompli of sovereignity over Greenland. The UK government in a terse statement said " Now you know why we buggered off".
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ivica

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #60 on: March 24, 2018, 10:09:37 PM »
If i'm to be asked that Chessboard would be around Summit Camp, but that also requires a bit of geoengineering what I strongly oppose. Kravata man guilty as charged


gerontocrat

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #61 on: April 04, 2018, 02:56:18 PM »
Data as at 3 April 2018 from-

https://www.dmi.dk/en/groenland/maalinger/greenland-ice-sheet-surface-mass-budget/

Greenland surface mass gain still continues very much on the low side, and cci-reanalyzer again predicts low precipitation over the next few days.

I will continue to cling to "my theory that belongs to me", i.e. that the decline in precipitation that started in November coincides with the onset and continuance of La Nina conditions and this is not a coincidence. I wonder if La Nina is associated with loads of snow elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere.
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litesong

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #62 on: April 08, 2018, 02:29:48 AM »
Interesting article about West Greenland ice melt being the greatest for many hundred years:
https://phys.org/news/2018-03-west-greenland-ice-sheet-fastest.html
Hope I'm not repeating someone else's post.

litesong

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #63 on: April 08, 2018, 05:10:43 AM »
Here's a new Greenland albedo study, in addition to satellite data, using drones that are said to increase square footage information on the areas the drones can access:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180404114735.htm

sidd

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #64 on: April 08, 2018, 05:17:08 AM »
I think I posted about remarkable recent greenland melt here:

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1090.msg147859.html

I included a graph.

sidd

gerontocrat

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #65 on: April 11, 2018, 02:16:28 PM »
NSIDC Greenland is open for business - including a review of 2017 that seems to reflect the cool and cloudy summer in the rest of the Arctic - but note the late melt events. Extracts below. The site also has some new(?) links.

https://nsidc.org/greenland-today/
Quote

2017 review and 2018 season kick-off
April 9, 2018


In 2017, the cumulative daily melt area for the Greenland ice sheet was the smallest since 1996, yet still higher than any year between 1979 and 1994 (1995 was a high melt season). The 2017 melt season was also notable for its late melt events, one of them occurring on October 29 to 31, tied for the latest for any year in the satellite record....

....The 2017 melt season was less intense than recent years, and was below average melt in the 1981 to 2010 reference period. Surface melting was particularly low in southeastern Greenland. In general, melting was limited to low elevations (below 1500 meters or 4900 feet) along the western and northeastern coastlines. Fewer melt days than average occurred along the Davis Strait and the interior melt pond region along the central western coast. As discussed below, the melt year ended with two significant late melt events in southeastern Greenland. The final 2017 melt event occurred at the end of October, covering the southeastern coast.

Overall, the 2017 melt season was the lowest since 1996. Although it began and ended with a few large melt events, the middle of the melt season through mid-July was below average—only briefly picking up intensity late in July through mid-August.
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Daniel B.

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #66 on: April 11, 2018, 02:22:56 PM »
Thank you for that post.  Perhaps it will be a one-year anomaly, but I found the particularly low melt in SE Greenland rather intriguing.  Unless I am mistaken, this has been an area of rather intense melting over the past decade, linked to warmer north Atlantic sea surface temperatures.  This will be interesting to watch this year.

magnamentis

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #67 on: April 11, 2018, 05:55:30 PM »
the more costal ice has melted on the more higher ground the remaining ice is situated which may well slowdown melting speed, at least when it comes to the part that is measured from bird view. dunno enough how things are measured but this is what came to my mind. it means that if you look at aerial images it looks like less melting while volume loss could be continued while perhaps slower due to lower temps at higher elevations?

this is meant as a question more than a statement, hoping for feedback to explain how things are officially/commonly measured.
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oren

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #68 on: April 11, 2018, 06:14:56 PM »
the more costal ice has melted on the more higher ground the remaining ice is situated which may well slowdown melting speed, at least when it comes to the part that is measured from bird view. dunno enough how things are measured but this is what came to my mind. it means that if you look at aerial images it looks like less melting while volume loss could be continued while perhaps slower due to lower temps at higher elevations?

this is meant as a question more than a statement, hoping for feedback to explain how things are officially/commonly measured.
The changes in Greenland are not such that ice height is changed sufficiently to affect melting speed. And last year the volume loss from melting was indeed low compared to previous years.

magnamentis

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #69 on: April 12, 2018, 09:48:27 PM »
the more costal ice has melted on the more higher ground the remaining ice is situated which may well slowdown melting speed, at least when it comes to the part that is measured from bird view. dunno enough how things are measured but this is what came to my mind. it means that if you look at aerial images it looks like less melting while volume loss could be continued while perhaps slower due to lower temps at higher elevations?

this is meant as a question more than a statement, hoping for feedback to explain how things are officially/commonly measured.
The changes in Greenland are not such that ice height is changed sufficiently to affect melting speed. And last year the volume loss from melting was indeed low compared to previous years.

after reading about how glacier growth is defined i already thought along that path, thanks for explaining. somehow makes sense because the entire island is a big glacier with it's "subdivisions" so to say :-)
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gerontocrat

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #70 on: April 13, 2018, 02:44:05 PM »
Data as at 12 April 2018 from-

https://www.dmi.dk/en/groenland/maalinger/greenland-ice-sheet-surface-mass-budget/

After the Sept / Oct large precipitation, Greenland surface mass gain still continues very much on the average to low side, and cci-reanalyzer again predicts low precipitation over the next few days, and once again mostly confined to the SE corner as yet another one or two lows come from the NE corner of North America, threatens rain on the coast and just dumps a bit of snow.

The only melt so far is the odd day with a little bit of sublimation insufficient to show as statistically significant.

I will continue to cling to "my theory that belongs to me", i.e. that the decline in precipitation that started in November coincides with the onset and continuance of La Nina conditions and this is not a coincidence. I wonder if La Nina is associated with loads of snow elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere.

The utterly average precipitation since October during this 2017-18 winter is the real oddity given the extreme abnormal events elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere. An example of when nothing happening is as significant as something happening?
« Last Edit: April 13, 2018, 02:49:17 PM by gerontocrat »
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Daniel B.

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #71 on: April 13, 2018, 05:24:41 PM »
To answer your La Nina question, I went over to NOAA, and found this from last fall:



https://www.climate.gov/news-features/blogs/enso/what-about-snow-during-la-ni%C3%B1a-winters

Fairly accurate, except that the snow line was further south along the Atlantic coast, but that was largely based on a more southerly rain/snow line.  Weaker La Ninas tend to push the snow further eastwards.  From what I have read, La Ninas tend to have very little influence across Eurasia.


gerontocrat

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #72 on: April 16, 2018, 07:47:53 PM »
Thanks, Daniel,

More data for "The theory that belongs to me". Meanwhile Greenland precipitation continues in utter and complete averageness. 
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gerontocrat

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #73 on: April 19, 2018, 02:18:50 PM »
Data as at 18 April 2018 from-

https://www.dmi.dk/en/groenland/maalinger/greenland-ice-sheet-surface-mass-budget/

After the Sept / Oct large precipitation, Greenland surface mass gain still continues very much on the average to low side, and cci-reanalyzer again predicts low precipitation over the next few days. Though for a change, after a few days precipitation (still low) will switch to the West Coast.

A big change today (sarcasm). A bit of pink on the todayssmb map (sublimation) but  insufficient to show as statistically significant.

I will continue to cling to "my theory that belongs to me", i.e. that the decline in precipitation that started in November coincides with the onset and continuance of La Nina conditions and this is not a coincidence. I wonder if La Nina is associated with loads of snow elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere.

The utterly average precipitation since October during this 2017-18 winter is the real oddity given the extreme abnormal events elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere. An example of when nothing happening is as significant as something happening? (But it is boring)
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Shared Humanity

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Re: Greenland 2018 melt season
« Reply #74 on: April 19, 2018, 10:16:49 PM »
I wonder if La Nina is associated with loads of snow elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere.


 :)