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Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1800 on: July 10, 2017, 08:35:37 PM »
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

oren

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1801 on: July 10, 2017, 11:37:03 PM »
Wind turbine blades - then and now.
Thanks. Amazing.

NevB

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1802 on: July 11, 2017, 03:26:17 AM »
*Musk's guarantee is completion within 100 days from the grid interconnect agreement signing, not from the recently announced contract signing.

BTW To clarify your point about the timing

From the linked article

When will it be finished?

The government wants it finished by December 1 and Tesla and Neoen have committed to doing that. Ironically, the 100-day-or-it’s-free offer will not start until the connection agreement is sealed with the Australian Energy Market Operator. That will likely take a couple of months, so the December 1 deadline will fall before the 100-day deadline.

The interesting point is that the government plans on having this completed "before the 100-day deadline".

We are all very much looking forward to see what impact this has next summer on pricing and grid stability. If this performs as expected over summer this will no doubt be a game changer in the debate on renewables at least in Australia.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1803 on: July 13, 2017, 09:44:55 PM »
New ‘Float and Submerge’ method utilised on UK offshore wind farm
This is the first time that this float and submerge method has been used on a wind farm project. The GBFs are held in place by gravity and this unique design reduces the need to use expensive marine equipment for the installation on the sea bed.”
https://www.renewableenergymagazine.com/wind/new-a-float-and-submergea--method-20170713/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1804 on: July 17, 2017, 04:11:02 PM »
U.S.:  EIA adds small-scale solar photovoltaic forecasts to its monthly Short-Term Energy Outlook
For the first time, EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), to be released later today, includes forecasts for small-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity and electricity generation. EIA forecasts that total U.S. small-scale solar PV capacity will grow from 14.3 gigawatts (GW) at the end of April 2017 to 21.9 GW at the end of 2018. The forecast 2018 capacity includes 13.7 GW in the residential sector and 8.2 GW in the commercial and industrial sectors. Annual U.S. small-scale solar PV electricity generation is expected to grow from 19,467 gigawatthours (GWh) in 2016 to 25,400 GWh this year and 32,900 GWh in 2018....
https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=31992#

Electrek says:
The main body of the US government watching energy production has made this decision because the volume of electricity produced is now significant enough to warrant the investment of their time. The 25,400GWh of small scale solar power is almost the same as three 1GW nuclear reactors (the average size) – and just under two nuclear facilities (multiple reactors at each facility). Even with the electric utilities attacking – this number is still growing hard – the EIA is predicting 50% growth from end of April 2017 through end of 2018 (equivalent to adding more than 1.5 nuclear reactors worth of electricity in about 1.5 years.
https://electrek.co/2017/07/17/egeb-climate-change-national-security-threat-miami-solar-maine-vote/
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numerobis

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1805 on: July 17, 2017, 04:56:12 PM »
Great -- now we can roll our eyes at EIA for being so impossibly conservative in its estimates of distributed solar year after year after year.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1806 on: July 19, 2017, 07:28:33 PM »
TVA:  We are forecasting high power demand because of the hot temperatures and high humidity, especially towards the end of the week. Our Raccoon Mountain Pump Storage facility can be called into action to quickly deliver 1,600 megawatts to help meet demand during peak times. At night or during times of low demand, the giant generators go in reverse and pump water from Nickajack Reservoir up to the top of the mountain. When power demand spikes, water is released down a thousand foot shaft, turning the generators to create electricity. Photos of the mountain top reservoir full after pumping:

https://www.facebook.com/TVA/posts/10154521008017691

Details:  https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raccoon_Mountain_Pumped-Storage_Plant
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1807 on: July 19, 2017, 08:49:29 PM »
The Hawaiian Public Utilities Commission has accepted a plan filed by the state's largest utility Hawaiian Electric Co. (HECO), outlining how it will reach 100% renewable energy resources by 2040 — five years ahead of the state's goal.

In its statement, HECO said its utilities exceeded the state’s 2015 renewable energy target and indicated they are on track to exceed the state’s renewable energy targets in 2020, 2030 and 2040. The utility said it will attain a renewable portfolio standard of 48% by 2020 without imported liquefied natural gas — once again ahead of the mandated 30% goal.

The PSIP aims for the addition 360 MW of grid-scale solar, 157 MW of wind energy, and 115 MW from demand response programs.
http://www.utilitydive.com/news/third-times-the-charm-regulators-accept-heco-plan-for-100-renewables/447305/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1808 on: July 19, 2017, 08:55:36 PM »
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1809 on: July 19, 2017, 09:05:29 PM »
The Hawaiian Public Utilities Commission has accepted a plan filed by the state's largest utility Hawaiian Electric Co. (HECO), outlining how it will reach 100% renewable energy resources by 2040 — five years ahead of the state's goal.

In its statement, HECO said its utilities exceeded the state’s 2015 renewable energy target and indicated they are on track to exceed the state’s renewable energy targets in 2020, 2030 and 2040. The utility said it will attain a renewable portfolio standard of 48% by 2020 without imported liquefied natural gas — once again ahead of the mandated 30% goal.

The PSIP aims for the addition 360 MW of grid-scale solar, 157 MW of wind energy, and 115 MW from demand response programs.
http://www.utilitydive.com/news/third-times-the-charm-regulators-accept-heco-plan-for-100-renewables/447305/


I expect we'll see a continuing stream of similar announcements over the coming years as the cost of RE and storage continues to fall, concern over climate change grows, and utilities understand how they can get rid of costly fossil fuels. 

numerobis

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1810 on: July 19, 2017, 09:40:54 PM »
It makes sense to see this first in remote equatorial locations. Even with low oil prices, diesel costs about $0.20/kWh of electricity just on its own, forget all other costs. And there's year-round about 12h of sun to compete with that. 50% reduction is pretty easy; batteries make 100% possible.

Remote polar is going to take a little longer, because the length of day gets short (or zero) part of the year.

Major population centres have been able to afford the fixed cost of large coal and natural gas plants which are much cheaper to run, so they'll take longer too.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1811 on: July 19, 2017, 09:53:20 PM »
Coal and gas plants are not cheaper to run.  Their marginal costs are very much higher than wind and solar.  The marginal costs for CCNG and coal are higher than subsidized wind and soon unsubsidized wind should be cheaper.  The marginal cost for gas turbines is high.  Subsidized solar is cheaper.



This table was copied out of a leaked draft of the Bush/Perry study which is suppose to prove that the US should increase its use of fossil fuels.  The worker bees at the DOE aren't having any of that foolishness.

Remote polar seems to be doing pretty well with wind.  And geothermal, where available, is very attractive because not only can electricity be generated at a reasonable price (compared to imported fuel) the waste heat can be used for building and greenhouse heating. 

Plus, closer to the poles, there tends to be more usable hydro.

The first places to go ~100% renewable will be more remote places like Hawaii where importing fuel has made electricity (and vehicle fuel) very expensive.  Islands are going to make good laboratories for 100% grids due to their smaller scale and isolation from other grids. 

numerobis

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1812 on: July 19, 2017, 10:49:23 PM »
 ::)

Bob, a principal of communication: try to understand the other person's argument.

If their argument is beyond stupid, ask yourself: did you really understand it?

Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1813 on: July 19, 2017, 11:07:22 PM »
I'm trying to understand.  But when people use words "creatively" it's hard to figure out what they are trying to convey.



Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1814 on: July 22, 2017, 05:12:21 PM »
RE100, a group of companies with a commitment to transition to 100% renewable power, has reached its 100 members milestone.  The group has total revenue of US$2.5 trillion and operates in a diverse range of sectors – from Information Technology to automobile manufacturing.
https://www.theclimategroup.org/news/world-first-100-multinationals-target-100-renewable-electricity
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Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1815 on: July 22, 2017, 08:04:52 PM »
“I can barely speak because I’m so angry,” said Supervisor Anthony Botelho. “This would have generated much-needed revenue. All you have to do is drive down there and see the conditions of our roads. We have minimal amounts of public safety. This was going to be a big thing, but the rug was pulled out from under us.


What's Republican Botelho so angry about?  A planned very large solar farm in his district has been downsized due to environmental concerns (critical habitat).

The original project, first proposed by a company called Solargen in 2009, would have consisted of 1.2 million solar panels producing 399 megawatts of electricity — enough to power about 100,000 homes.

After San Benito County — with a population of only 58,000 — approved it, three environmental groups sued, saying the county had not adequately protected the endangered giant kangaroo rat, blunt-nosed leopard lizard and San Joaquin kit fox, along with bird species such as the tri-colored blackbird that live in the ranchlands.

Under the settlement, Con Edison, which took full ownership last year, will reduce it again and build a 130-megawatt plant in Panoche Valley — providing enough power for about 32,500 homes. The project is about one-third the size of the original plan.

http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/07/21/giant-solar-project-reduced-due-to-environmentalists-opposition/


We've seen Republicans defend wind farms due to the tax revenues they produce and the jobs they create.  Now we may be seeing solar starting to enjoy support from the 'reds'. 

Good news for the planet....


gerontocrat

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1816 on: July 24, 2017, 01:48:47 PM »
"China Cracks 100 Gigawatts of Solar Capacity as Musk Pitches More U.S. Gigafactories"

An article from https://robertscribbler.com/ well worth a read.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1817 on: July 24, 2017, 03:38:09 PM »
The Attacks On Cleantech Leaders Have Begun — Expect More
Renewables and electric vehicles have already gotten extremely competitive, but when more oil, gas, coal, nuclear, auto, taxi, investment, and semi truck companies are collapsing or have collapse in their sight, they will get desperate. Some of them will hire professional shit talkers. Some of them will fund political campaigns for people like Don the Con. Some of them will commission error-infused reports from think tanks. All of these actions will lead to some genuine, good-hearted people getting incorrect ideas in their heads — bad ideas — and unbeknownst to themselves fighting progress.
https://cleantechnica.com/2017/07/23/attacks-cleantech-leaders-begun-expect/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1818 on: July 24, 2017, 03:50:30 PM »
Africa unplugged
Small-scale solar power is surging ahead
https://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21709297-small-scale-solar-power-surging-ahead-africa-unplugged

Electrek says:
Off-grid solar…is now thought to be providing power to perhaps 600,000 households in Africa. Industry executives reckon that over the next year the number of home-power systems on African roofs will grow by 60-100%. M-Kopa, the market leader, has installed 400,000 systems and, at its current rate of growth, may add another 200,000 to that number over the next year. Smaller rivals such as Off Grid Electric, Bboxx and Azuri Technologies may well double their client base over the same period.

– These are millions of people who will first learn to manage their electricity usage by getting just a touch of what a western lifestyle uses. They will buy efficient hardware to maximize and not waste a drip. Overtime, they’ll expand adding more panels and more household hardware. Infrastructure won’t get built here – and just like cell phones leapfrogged poles – so will off-grid solar.
https://electrek.co/2017/07/24/egeb-houston-coal-plants-layoff-berlin-flow-battery-gender-equality-stem/
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Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1819 on: July 24, 2017, 05:13:40 PM »
From Wiki -

M-Kopa (M = mobile, 'kopa' is Swahili for 'borrowed') is a Kenyan solar energy company that was founded in 2011 by Nick Hughes, Chad Larson, and Jesse Moore.[1] Hughes previously set up and ran M-PESA at Vodafone where Moore also worked whilst completing his MBA.[2] Larson and Moore were fellow MBA students at Oxford University [3][4] The company sells home solar systems in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda.[5] Customers pay a deposit of 3,500 KES (approx $35), take the system home then pay 50 KES (approx $0.50) a day for a period of one year,[6] to own the solar system.

Daily payments are made through M-PESA, a mobile phone based money system, and in addition to getting solar power, customers also slowly off-set the cost of the device.[7] The system is meant for an off-grid household who is using kerosene (paraffin) lamps to light their home, and paying for batteries and phone charging.

The latest M-KOPA 4, has an eight watt solar panel that charges cell phones, a radio and a torch, via USB, includes 2 LED bulbs with light switches, as well as a rechargeable LED torch (flashlight) and a radio.[8] M-KOPA Solar sells through a network of dealers, across the countries of Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda.[9]

Micro solar is an idea that started in Bangladesh.  In Bangladesh more than 3 million homes and small businesses have installed small solar systems.  Moving from kero and candles to LEDs is a major lifestyle improvement.  People will have many fewer respiratory and cataract problems.  They'll be able to access information via smartphones and tablets.  People will be able to work after dark and increase their income.  Students will be able to study in much better light.

People now pay a large part of their income on kero and candles.  After a year they will own their solar system and that money will be freed for other needs.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1820 on: July 24, 2017, 09:16:23 PM »
Are Four Wind-Turbine Failures in Five Weeks Too Many for NextEra Energy?
Out of the ordinary but not a surprise with thousands spinning, company says
“These are four different issues at four different sites involving two different equipment manufacturers. Two of the issues involved turbine blades, one was a tower, and one was a fire in the nacelle. Yes, we are investigating each incident, as we would with any equipment issue. … We view these as isolated equipment issues. I should also point out there were no injuries.”
...
NextEra Energy Resources owns and operates nearly 10,000 wind turbines across the country. Of the turbines’ combined 30,000 blades, there are only five or six blade failures a year, so two in a month is out of the ordinary, Garner notes....
http://www.enr.com/articles/42352-are-four-wind-turbine-failures-in-five-weeks-too-many-for-nextera-energy

 :'(
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1821 on: July 24, 2017, 09:23:45 PM »
A square ~161 km (~100 miles) on a side would, during 1 year, produce the energy equivalent to that used annually in the entire United States.
– Elon‘s 100 Mile Square of solar panels has been around for almost 20 years now. Interesting data points from research – 10% efficiency of solar panels. Today’s average commodity solar panel is about 16% efficiency, 60% greater than in the article. Solar panels pretty soon (middle 2020s?) will be pushing 20-24% for the commodity product. Greater than 100-140% more efficiency than the paper. That square gets smaller every day.
https://electrek.co/2017/07/24/egeb-houston-coal-plants-layoff-berlin-flow-battery-gender-equality-stem/

A Realizable Renewable Energy Future (1999 research)
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/12872590_A_Realizable_Renewable_Energy_Future
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Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1822 on: July 24, 2017, 10:01:57 PM »
Take that yellow square.  Cut it in half or less because wind, hydro, and geothermal are likely to furnish more than half of all US electricity.  The northern parts of the country are much richer in wind and hydro resources than solar (on a 365 day basis).

Now take that ~40% sized square and distribute it over rooftops, parking lots and low value (ag/wildlife/brownfield) land. 

We be fine....

Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1823 on: July 25, 2017, 07:29:42 PM »
Opponents of the Suniva-SolarWorld trade case have a new, and perhaps surprising, set of allies: conservative policy groups.

The Heritage Foundation and the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) have come out against the recent petition to impose tariffs on imported crystalline silicon solar products, joining in a coalition with the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) and others. Mounting dissent from across the political spectrum could help convince Republican President Donald Trump to refuse the introduction of trade barriers.

The Energy Trade Action Coalition (ETAC) officially launched on Friday to coordinate opposition to the trade case. Financially troubled U.S.-based solar product manufacturers Suniva and SolarWorld launched the dispute this spring, claiming that imported solar equipment has "heavily distorted" the market and caused "significant harm" to America's solar manufacturing base.

The case was filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) under Section 201 of the 1974 Trade Act, which is an obscure section of U.S. trade law that could allow the president to impose tariffs, minimum prices or quotas on solar products from any country in the world if the ITC finds "serious injury."

The petition specifically seeks duties of 40 cents per watt on imported cells and a floor price of 78 cents per watt on modules, which could be devastating to the broader U.S. solar industry. Implementing these tariffs is projected to erase one-half of all solar installations expected to come on-line through 2022, according to GTM Research.

The Heritage Foundation is not widely thought of as a solar advocate. The organization has argued for letting the solar Investment Tax Credit expire, criticized U.S. military investments in solar power, and applauded Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord, which could slow the adoption of renewables in the long term. The conservative policy think tank has received funding from organizations tied to the Koch brothers, who have strong financial ties to the fossil fuel industry and have been accused of lobbying against rooftop solar.

The Koch brothers are also backers of ALEC, a nonprofit organization of conservative state legislators and private-sector representatives, which has opposed state-level renewable energy standards and helped craft policies that make residential solar less attractive. However, ALEC is also a member of the new coalition opposing the Suniva and SolarWorld trade case.

Implementing tariffs on imported solar equipment would likely slash demand for new projects and make solar less competitive with other sources of power. So it would make sense that groups that have traditionally supported fossil fuels would support the trade petition. However, right-leaning members of ETAC say they're predominantly concerned about protectionist measures and the damage they will cause to one of America's high-tech growth industries.

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/conservative-groups-oppose-suniva-solarworld-trade-case


The solar industry is now large enough that it is getting support from large business interest groups.  While many of those people are scum it's still very important.  It provides a level of protection against local crackpots.

That the Kochs are part of the support against tariffs on imported panels is most interesting.  They are supporting a technology that is positioning to destroy their fossil fuel interests.  Perhaps they've seen the writing on the wall and are now going to get into renewable energy.  Where the real money is going to be.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1824 on: July 26, 2017, 04:10:58 PM »
"That the Kochs are part of the support against tariffs on imported panels is most interesting.  They are supporting a technology that is positioning to destroy their fossil fuel interests.  Perhaps they've seen the writing on the wall and are now going to get into renewable energy.  Where the real money is going to be."


I have an easier time believing that the Koch brothers figure that without protectionism, US solar companies will fail.
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Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1825 on: July 26, 2017, 05:03:59 PM »
In terms of getting panels hooked to the grid it doesn't matter if US panel manufacturers go out of business. 


Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1826 on: July 27, 2017, 09:04:21 PM »
American Wind Energy:  #Windpower fact of the day: 14 states now rely on wind to generate at least 10% of their electricity.
https://mobile.twitter.com/AWEA/status/889878684190035970

Electrek says:  "Looking at the swath across the Midwest you see Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas and Oklahoma all above 20% of their electricity from wind power…and then you’ve got to ask – what’s wrong with Nebraska at 10%? Missouri at 1.4%? Politics baby – big money politics. Nebraska is the only state in the union whose coal use has increased over the last decade."
https://electrek.co/2017/07/27/egeb-utilities-making-money-from-green-rough-solar-cells-hail-1-san-antonio-solar-0-more/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1827 on: July 27, 2017, 09:20:50 PM »
Severe hail damage to PV panels.  And not.

Small-scale EPC replaces 17,920 panels at two-year-old solar farm
Sometimes freak accidents happen. Like when a hail storm takes down an entire 4.4-MW solar farm in Texas.

“This was a very rare, unusual event,” said Adam Burke, president of Texas Green Energy. “It was a pretty isolated area, but it happened to be right over Alamo 2 solar farm. It was baseball-sized hail.”

About one-third of the solar panels at OCI Solar Power’s Alamo 2 dual-axis solar project were visibly damaged by the April 2016 hail storm, with many panels having multiple points of impact. Alamo 2 is one of many sites within OCI’s 400-MW Alamo project for San Antonio’s utility CPS Energy. The damaged two-year-old solar array was still producing some energy, but CPS Energy wanted its asset back at full capacity.

Texas Green Energy (No. 184 on the 2017 Top Solar Contractors list), usually a small-scale solar installer based in College Station, Texas, won the bid to reinstall all 4.4 MW at Alamo 2. Although every panel didn’t have shattered glass, many were assumed to have microcracks, so it was determined to replace all 17,920 panels.

“It required some careful planning and orchestration to replace everything all at once with minimal downtime,” Burke said. “We had it all planned out to the day what was going to happen. The plant was divided into four sections called blocks. We shut down two blocks at a time so we could be working on the second one as the first one was coming up so we weren’t just sitting there waiting for things to be reconnected.” ...
https://www.solarpowerworldonline.com/2017/07/small-scale-epc-replaces-17920-panels-two-year-old-solar-farm/


Compare:

Hail No! National Lab's Solar Panels Survive Severe Storm
The Denver area was pelted with an unusually severe hailstorm on May 8 – one that left a trail of destruction in its wake, shattering car windows and leaving golf ball-sized dents on the roofs of local homes and vehicles.

After the storm, staff at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) set out to assess the damage. Its main campus in Golden, Colorado boasts more than 2.5 megawatts of photovoltaic (PV) power. A majority of those panels (more than 3,000) are located on or adjacent to the roof of the lab’s Research Support Facility, a net-zero energy building. The post-storm inspection revealed just one broken panel. 
...
NREL researchers are funded by SunShot to participate in the International Photovoltaic Quality Assurance Task Force, which develops standardized industry quality tests to assure that solar panels on the market can survive the harsh environmental conditions to which they are directly exposed. This includes not only how panels react to mechanical stress, such as hail or being walked on, but also high and low temperatures, humidity, solar ultraviolet radiation, and even the electrical stress that the panels apply to themselves when operating in high-voltage systems. These quality standards help reinforce consumer and investor confidence in PV.
...
https://energy.gov/eere/articles/hail-no-national-labs-solar-panels-survive-severe-storm

Images:
Top: Texas
Bottom: Denver
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Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1828 on: July 27, 2017, 09:34:49 PM »
In places where there is a potential for very large hailstones solar farms need to use tracking mounts.  And the mounts need to be able to set the panels vertical when the potential for a damaging storm develops.

The difference between fixed mount and single axis tracking is small ($0.99/watt vs. $1.08/watt, installed prices).  Double axis tracking would cost a bit more but a lot less than the cost of replacing panels.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1829 on: July 31, 2017, 04:22:04 PM »
“We highlight [the] importance of the paradigm shift from the traditional ‘generation to follow demand’ to ‘demand to follow generation’ in renewable-rich energy mix scenarios.”
A new optimization model (solar PV plus demand response) could bring higher solar-power integration
– In the first case study, consumers responded to their own demand profile without PV generation (e.g., they delayed using their washing machine until later in the evening). In the second, participants responded to their own PV-generation profiles. For them, DR consisted of load shifting (e.g., taking a hot shower in the morning when local solar power is available). In the last case study, consumers considered both their own demand and PV generation profiles simultaneously (e.g., they decreased their use of air conditioning after receiving a signal from a central DR optimizer). The basic idea is that – “We highlight [the] importance of the paradigm shift from the traditional ‘generation to follow demand’ to ‘demand to follow generation’ in renewable-rich energy mix scenarios,” said Chin Kim Gan. For those of us used to getting what we want – when we want it, this might be a shock. However, I’d argue that it’ll be a lot less inconvenient in the western world than we think once the system works through the bugs – and for those who are still getting used to having healthy sums of electricity, it’ll be no problem at all to deal with
https://electrek.co/2017/07/31/egeb-minnesota-social-cost-texas-vermont-solar-storage/

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170725122034.htm
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1830 on: July 31, 2017, 04:35:53 PM »
IEA:  The share of renewables in total energy supply in #Africa was 49.8% in 2015, our latest #renewables stats show
http://www.iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/renewables-information---2017-edition---overview.html

https://twitter.com/iea/status/889861461157318657
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Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1831 on: July 31, 2017, 06:40:58 PM »
[the] importance of the paradigm shift from the traditional ‘generation to follow demand’ to ‘demand to follow generation’ in renewable-rich energy mix scenarios,

This is going to be an interesting evolution to watch.  A few years from now I expect we'll be buying smart appliances that use grid signals in order to follow generation.  Refrigerators, for example, may cool down a couple extra degrees when the nighttime wind is blowing hard and then mostly 'coast' drifting a few degrees warmer until the daytime solar kicks in.  You may put your dishes in the dishwasher but it won't run until it gets the 'best generation of the night' signal.

EVs will need, on average, only three hours of charging.  In the sunny South we may see lots of charge outlets installed in workplace and school parking lots.  In the windy Midwest there may be far less daytime charging but mostly charging at night.  On cold winter nights  your car might warm up its interior just before people start increasing their normal morning demand and then have less warming to do an hour or so later when you are about to leave for work.

I know about this stuff.  I'm right now waiting for the Sun to get a bit higher in the sky before I turn on my well pump and put a few hundred gallons in the garden/orchard tank.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1832 on: August 01, 2017, 04:24:56 PM »
Tesla and Deepwater Wind are bidding for a massive new energy storage and wind power project
We previously reported on Deepwater Wind for building the US’ first offshore wind farm in Rhode Island.

Now they announced a bid on a new proposed project in Massachusetts.

They wrote in a press release:

“Deepwater Wind is proposing the 144-megawatt Revolution Wind farm – paired with a 40 megawatt-hour battery storage system provided by Tesla – in response to the Commonwealth’s request for proposals for new sources of clean energy in Section 83D of the Act to Promote Energy Diversity. Deepwater Wind also provided alternative bids for a larger 288 MW version of Revolution Wind and a smaller 96 MW version.”
...
If approved, the new project, dubbed ‘Revolution Wind’, would be built on a federal lease site off the coast of Massachusetts located 30 miles from the mainland and about 12 miles south of Martha’s Vineyard.
...
https://electrek.co/2017/08/01/tesla-deepwater-wind-energy-storage-powerpack/
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1833 on: August 02, 2017, 12:31:12 AM »
To which Elon Musk replied:  "Batteries!"
https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/892083176897626113


Californians urged to save energy during solar eclipse
Californians have been asked to save energy during next month's eagerly-anticipated solar eclipse to help reduce the strain on the state's solar power resources.

The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) has set up the CalEclipse.org website, where Californians are urged to “do your thing for the sun,” by reducing energy usage from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. PT during the Aug. 21 solar eclipse. ...
www.foxnews.com/science/2017/07/31/californians-urged-to-save-energy-during-solar-eclipse.html
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

numerobis

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1834 on: August 02, 2017, 05:46:31 PM »
Colville Lake recently installed a solar + battery + diesel power plant.

The idea was to use diesel as a backup and during the winter, and turn to the sun for everything else.

Twelve months later, that’s about how it’s worked out, Myra Berrube of Northwest Territories Power Corporation said.

“During periods when the batteries are loaded up or we’re getting good production out of the solar facility, we can in fact turn off the diesel. The community has made comment that it’s quiet.”

Berrube said about one-fifth of the town’s annual energy use now comes from the sun, even though the panels produce almost nothing between November and January. Just as important, the batteries allow more efficient operation of the diesel generator.

The corporation estimates that Colville Lake ran the generator at least 27 per cent less, saving it more than 37,000 litres of diesel fuel.

...

The total cost was about $8 million and required $1.3 million in government funding.

I think I understand this to mean they're saving about 20% from having solar panels and about 10% from having batteries so they can run the generator more efficiently. Unless their basis of comparison is the old generator, in which case it seems like the new generator is likely to be 10% more efficient on its own, regardless of batteries -- but even then the batteries would have allowed them to run a smaller generator (and save money on capital). Unclear, but either way it's a win.

The cost is a bit high: $53k per capita. They don't say how much it would have cost without solar and battery.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2017, 09:25:56 PM by numerobis »

Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1835 on: August 02, 2017, 06:13:40 PM »
Your Colville Lake link isn't working for me.  I found the story here -

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/colville-lake-solar-power-1.3604310

Now they need to install a wind turbine.   Check into refurbished smaller turbines which are being replaced in some wind farms.

Operational question (from another article on their system).

When the sun is up, the 130 kilowatt solar panel system charges the batteries.

"Anytime the battery is 100 per cent charged it will flip over to battery and the town will be powered by battery during that time," said Pam Coulter, spokesperson for the Northwest Territories Power Corporation.

"When it goes down to about 40 per cent, the generators will kick back in."


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/colville-lake-solar-diesel-hybrid-power-1.3441205

That does not seem to be the best approach.  Use solar output to cover demand and store any extra.  By using solar to first charge the batteries and then supply demand out of the batteries they are losing about 10% of their generation.

But, good on them.  Cutting FF use 40% is an excellent first step. 

etienne

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1836 on: August 02, 2017, 06:57:49 PM »
That does not seem to be the best approach.  Use solar output to cover demand and store any extra.  By using solar to first charge the batteries and then supply demand out of the batteries they are losing about 10% of their generation.

But, good on them.  Cutting FF use 40% is an excellent first step.

I guess, only the oversupply does into the batteries, so the 10% lost isn't really a loss.

Maybe the batteries might make it possible to have a more stable power demand and better efficiency of the diesel generator.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1837 on: August 02, 2017, 07:37:02 PM »
Perhaps it's a reporting error but it's not what the article says.

The battery bank should make the diesel more efficient.  The engine can be run at its optimal speed rather than cranking up and down with demand.  That's how hybrid cars become efficient.

ghoti

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1838 on: August 02, 2017, 08:03:15 PM »
The battery bank should make the diesel more efficient.  The engine can be run at its optimal speed rather than cranking up and down with demand.  That's how hybrid cars become efficient.
Actually up to now the most efficient hybrid cars become so by switching to an Atkinson cycle engine and by not wasting deceleration energy but instead recycling it for acceleration.

We'll see how efficient the decoupling of the engine from the drive turns out with cars like the Nissan Note E-Power. Though since it is only sold in Japan we are unlikely to get reliable EPA fuel efficiency values. The Japanese test cycle is completely bogus.

edit: Actually I just found Japanese test cycle numbers for the Note E-Power and Prius hybrid (Atkinson engine, planetary gearing). The separate engine driving a generator to run the motor of the E-Power is 20% less fuel efficient compared to the Prius regular hybrid.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2017, 08:19:33 PM by ghoti »

Sebastian Jones

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1839 on: August 02, 2017, 08:11:31 PM »

Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1840 on: August 02, 2017, 08:34:56 PM »
That link works and the description of how the solar/diesel system works makes more sense than the source I found...

“During periods when the batteries are loaded up or we’re getting good production out of the solar facility, we can in fact turn off the diesel.

I'm surprised they haven't done the math for system payback.  They know how much fuel they've saved and how much fuel costs them per liter.  They should be able to project extended generator life based on fewer hours of operation. 

The corporation estimates that Colville Lake ran the generator at least 27 per cent less, saving it more than 37,000 litres of diesel fuel.

numerobis

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1841 on: August 02, 2017, 09:41:08 PM »
Sorry, link fixed. Every forum software uses subtly different ways to write in links. But it got found anyway!

I'm not surprised the CBC story is out to lunch.

The payback time just in terms of diesel cost saved is likely infinite. They're saving maybe $80k a year (assuming a bit over $2/litre) in fuel costs, whereas the new system probably cost an extra few million compared to just buying a new generator.

But the new system has certain benefits over the old one, such as reliability -- when the generator fails the batteries can step in for a minute while the plant restarts. And that means the school be open more often, etc. Also, if a shipment is delayed they have a bit longer before running out of fuel (assuming they didn't downsize their tanks), which reduces the risk of having to fly fuel in which is crazy expensive. And the air is cleaner, less asthma etc. And the town is less noisy, better sleep. And regional mayors will visit to see the system, which means money for the hotel and airport worker.

To calculate the full benefit, you need to take those into account.

ghoti

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1842 on: August 02, 2017, 10:59:13 PM »
There is a Canadian government website that lists all northern communities with their annual diesel usage and cost. Of course now that I want it I can't find the link :(

My recollection of it though is that the diesel costs were huge - in the millions per year for most of the places. That makes me extremely skeptical that 27% reduction in generator use saved only 37,000 liters of fuel.

I'll keep searching for the info...

numerobis

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1843 on: August 02, 2017, 11:21:46 PM »
37,000 divided by about 150 people means they are saving about 250 litres per person per year. So they were burning 1,000 litres per person per year before, just for electricity.

On top of that there's heating & hot water. In Iqaluit it seems to be 300-500 litres per house per month, which per capita is a bit more than the amount used for electricity.

All in all that would be around 2,000 litres per person, plus a bit for transport.

So you'd expect something like 16 million litres in Iqaluit, but only 300,000 litres in Colville Lake. When you find that link, let me know how far off I am!

Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1844 on: August 02, 2017, 11:39:57 PM »
1,000 litres per person per year

I think in gallons.  (We're primitives, down here.)  That's 264 gallons per year per person.  0.7 gallon per day.

Based on days when I need to run my generator that seems a little on the low side seeing how I'm pretty electricity efficient.  The number might work if people per household is high enough so that things like refrigerators and TVs are being shared.


ghoti

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1845 on: August 03, 2017, 01:10:27 AM »
This isn't the government site I was looking for but it has a bunch of info on energy use in all the Nunavut communities.

http://www.nunavutenergy.ca/en/communities

I also found a list of all communities with the diesel generator capacity and annual total electricity used.

https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/sites/www.nrcan.gc.ca/files/canmetenergy/files/pubs/2013-118_en.pdf

Most of these communities are tiny and have very low demand. Most look like they could be served by a single 2MW wind turbine though it likely would be more reliable to have multiple.

I also saw multiple reports listing most of the diesel generators as having 0 year lifetime left.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2017, 01:32:06 AM by ghoti »

Sebastian Jones

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1846 on: August 03, 2017, 06:28:52 AM »
Yes, the fact that the diesel generators in most of the Arctic communities in Canada are at the end of their lives opens the door to a pretty good opportunity to rethink how to produce electricity. Complicating matters is the subsidies that consumers get ( thus also the utilities) of electricity so that they can actually afford electricity generated  with fly-in diesel. In Alaska they do not get subsidized electricity, so they are further ahead in installing hybrid wind-solar-diesel- battery systems. In Canada, there is less outcry from outraged consumers who do not pay the full cost of electricity, and no outcry at all from the utilities that do quite nicely under the current regime, and would do no better, and possibly worse if community members began generating their own electricity.
 

numerobis

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1847 on: August 03, 2017, 03:42:30 PM »
ghoti: It's around $1/W for a big wind tower, but the cranes (a big crane to put up the tower, and a small crane to put up the big crane) cost a cool million to rent for the season and ship up and down.

So except for the larger communities (3k people or more), it's better to put in small towers. 100 kW can be put up with much cheaper equipment.

Most of the generators in the North are the originals that were put in back in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s when the government decided electrification should occur. They're not only at end of life, but the population has increased and demand per capita increased.

Sebastian: indeed! In Nunavut, residential customers see heavy subsidies, about 60-70% off the total cost. Commercial and government pay their fair share. In Quebec, rates are set based on cheap hydro in the southern half of the province: 5.75c/kWh up to 8.5c/kWh depending on usage... and by law, remote communities get the same price! So that's about a 80-90% subsidy.

The total cost includes capital expenses for diesel generators, but renewables on their own don't help reduce the size of generators you need. The peak is early-evening in winter. Solar doesn't reduce the peak at all (every early evening in winter, the sun is set), and wind doesn't either (there's enough early evenings in winter to pretty much guarantee one of them will have calm winds).

Batteries, however, do reduce the peak demand for generation capacity -- store it up all day, then drain the batteries during the peak -- and to use renewables on a small grid you pretty much need batteries anyway (to provide the "inertia" that smooths out supply and demand mismatches). That's a nice synergy.

One of the major problems here is access to capital. As I wrote on Ars on a recent thread, a mere billion dollars would modernize the entire Northern set of microgrids in Canada. That money is getting spent anyway on various things here, but there seems to be a problem matching up the supply of money and the demand for it. My partner's group is working hard to solve a tricky problem: how to blow a couple million by the end of FY2017 on initiatives that are within their mandate. Meanwhile, the power company is holding off on renewables for want of access to capital.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1848 on: August 03, 2017, 04:46:59 PM »
If the government is paying a "80-90% subsidy" and renewables would be cheaper then it seems that the government would provide the capital.

TerryM

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #1849 on: August 03, 2017, 04:57:33 PM »
During my very limited time in the north I was taken aback at how little wind I encountered. I assume a portion of this was due to settlements being founded away from gale swept areas. Particularly during winter months when solar is closed for the season, it may be that not much wind power is available to harvest. Is anyone aware of testing in the far north for the availability of winds that are both strong enough and steady enough to make turbines practical?


Katabatic winds over glaciers might be just the ticket if a practical means can be found to secure the turbine. While a conventional tower might be prone to damage from glacial ice and windage during gusts, in a narrow fjord it might be possible to hang a turbine from a wire strung between the fjord walls, allowing it to swing up to a horizontal position during severe gusts.
Repairs & maintenance might be facilitated by reeling the turbine back to one of the grounding points & this could even be a safety dock when inclement weather was forecast.


A small installation could be attempted at little cost, then scaled up if it proved practical.


Terry


BTW



The Atkinson Cycle reads proved very interesting & it sounds as though simply changing out existing generators to Atkinson cycle generators might produce large increases in efficiency that might pay for themselves in a very short time.