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magnamentis

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1200 on: June 26, 2018, 09:22:18 PM »
Thanks to the wisdom of Melina Trump I think this sums up this administration's philosophy.
"I really don't care. Do U?"

Did you mean Melanoma Trump?  ;)

hard words, not saying anyhing about validity, just surprised them coming from you ;)
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Neven

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1201 on: June 27, 2018, 07:38:28 PM »
Thanks to the wisdom of Melina Trump I think this sums up this administration's philosophy.
"I really don't care. Do U?"

Did you mean Melanoma Trump?  ;)

hard words, not saying anyhing about validity, just surprised them coming from you ;)

It was just a joke to indicate he had misspelled her name. Maybe a bit harsh, yes.

I actually replaced the I with the Om, which is what the Buddha tells us to do.  ;)

Compare, compare, compare

Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1202 on: July 04, 2018, 01:53:55 PM »

In defense of the coral.

Hawaii bans sunscreens that harm coral reefs
Quote
Hawaii Gov. David Ige on Tuesday signed the first bill in the country that will ban sunscreens containing chemicals harmful to coral reefs. The bill, which was passed by state lawmakers in May, will go into effect January 1, 2021. At that point, the sale or distribution of over-the-counter sunscreens containing oxybenzone and octinoxate, which help filter UV rays, will be prohibited.

A study by Haereticus Environmental Laboratory, a nonprofit scientific organization, found the chemicals cause bleaching, deformities, DNA damage and ultimately death in coral when they're washed off beachgoers or discharged into wastewater treatment plants and deposited into bodies of water. ...
https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2018/07/03/health/hawaii-sunscreen-ban/index.html
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1203 on: July 10, 2018, 02:00:07 AM »
Great Salmon Escape Threatens to Taint Chile Fish Farm Industry
Quote
A massive salmon "spill" at a fish farm in southern Chile last week is once again tainting an industry that earned the country more than $4 billion last year.

About 900,000 salmon escaped from a Marine Harvest ASA farm during a storm on July 5, according to the Bergen, Norway-based company. The fish are not fit for consumption, Marine Harvest said in a press release, and the company is trying to recapture them.

Chile’s salmon industry was already under attack for the use of hundreds of tons of antibiotics every year and allegations that the dumping of dead fish in the past has fueled algae blooms that damage the local fishing industry. The escaped salmon are a non-native species to southern Chile and could harm other fish stocks, while their decomposition adds to ammonia in the water, potentially fueling a fresh outbreak of algae bloom, Greenpeace Chile Oceans Coordinator Estefania Gonzalez said.

"The scale of the event is such that it threatens the biodiversity of the region, and we’re very worried," Gonzalez said. "The industry has expanded in a very aggressive manner in places that need to be dedicated to conservation -- it’s a chemical bomb."

Marine Harvest said it would minimize the possible environmental impact of the escape, and try to recapture as many of the fish as possible.
https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2018-07-09/great-salmon-escape-threatens-to-taint-chile-fish-farm-industry
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Shared Humanity

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1204 on: July 10, 2018, 02:03:23 AM »
I love all types of fish and seafood. I have quit eating it because we are destroying fisheries across the planet and I don't want to contribute to this.

My main sources of meat protein are organic chicken and beef.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1205 on: July 10, 2018, 09:06:35 PM »
A&W introduces Beyond Meat vegetarian burgers across Canada
Quote
The burger chain partnered with California-based Beyond Meat to create a plant-based burger that it is now serving at its more than 925 restaurants across Canada.

The company, whose investors include Bill Gates and Leonardo DiCaprio, makes its Beyond Meat burger with beets to mimic beef’s red colouring, and coconut oil and potato starch to give it a similar juiciness and chew.

A&W says it is the first national burger chain to bring the plant-based burger to Canadian customers and Beyond Meat’s largest restaurant partner.

Beyond Meat sells its plant-based burgers, sausages, and chicken strips at thousands of American retailers and the company says its products are served at over 11,000 restaurants and other food service outlets mostly in the U.S.
https://business.financialpost.com/pmn/business-pmn/aw-introduces-beyond-meat-vegetarian-burgers-across-canada
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Bruce Steele

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1206 on: July 10, 2018, 09:54:16 PM »
SH, " Terrestrial agriculture is the largest driver of biodiversity loss since the last asteroid"
US fishermen are not distroying fisheries ! So you may have your beef with seafood but maybe you could show me some supporting evidence of your claims ? Don't eat imported fish ,you can even reduce your carbon footprint if you select wisely.

http://sustainablefisheries-uw.org/eating-plants-and-seafood/
 
Number of US overfished fish stocks at all time low.

http://sustainablefisheries-uw.org/number-of-overfished-us-stocks-at-an-all-time-low/

Fish management is something we do rather well .





« Last Edit: July 10, 2018, 10:10:50 PM by Bruce Steele »

Lurk

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1207 on: July 11, 2018, 10:27:54 AM »
US fishermen are not destroying fisheries ! .. ? ? ?

A tad US-centric me thinks. It's a big world out there :)

The Lafayette operates in the South Pacific Ocean fishing for Chilean Jack Mackerel, a white fish primarily consumed in West Africa and currently worth $1000/ton. It's the seventh most harvested fish in the world. Pacific Andes, the company that owns the Lafayette, was one of the first fishing companies to commercially supply the Alaskan Pollock. Pollock is now used in the likes of McDonald's fish fillets.
https://gizmodo.com/5845939/the-worlds-largest-floating-fish-factory
http://www.paresourcesdevelopment.com/html/index.php
https://markets.ft.com/data/equities/tearsheet/profile?s=1174:HKG

The governance of fisheries in international waters presents a significant challenge to
regulatory bodies. International waters are not owned by any one nation and the vessels
of any country can harvest from them. In the absence of a regulatory structure, fish
populations in international waters may be overharvested to the point of collapse
https://ppgr.files.wordpress.com/2013/12/ppgr-volume-5-issue-1-final-export-high-quality-pp-20-34.pdf

There's an ocean of documentation out there that never rises to the level of being reported on in the US or anywhere.

2010 - is it true the oceans will be empty in 30 years?


Empty Oceans Empty Nets from: Steve Cowan
Produced In: 2003 | Story Teller's Country: United States
Tags: Ecology, Global, Livelihood, Resources
http://www.cultureunplugged.com/documentary/watch-online/festival/play/5917/Empty-Oceans-Empty-Nets
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"The history of the race, and each individual's experience, are thick with evidence that a truth is not hard to kill and that a lie told well is immortal." — Mark Twain

Bruce Steele

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1208 on: July 11, 2018, 11:41:02 PM »
ASI.  Shared Humanity said he had quit eatting fish do to concerns about overfishing around the world.
SH lives in the US and because all fish products in the US have country of origin labels he can choose to eat fish from well managed fish stocks if he chooses "product of USA" labels. Also and importantly he can choose to eat fish products that come with a much lower carbon footprint than beef, one of his protein choices.
 I read your links and yes there are very big corporate interests involved with international fishing fleets. So too are there huge corporate investments in soy , cattle , palm oil, and any number of terrestrially damaging agricultural practices . We as consumers can choose how we respond by what it is we choose to purchase. I have been a commercial fisherman, a vegetable farmer and pig farmer. I would prefer to totally withdraw from any purchase of corporate produced food. To live as close to the land ( and sea ) as I can and do so without using fossil fuels. Food represents about one third of most people's carbon footprint. Getting that reduced to near zero is about as fanciful as Mars missions to harvest mana. I am trying to get to zero... Probably just nuts !
 It bothers me that IPCC says we have to get CO2 emissions to near zero within a few short decades but there is no organized effort to do so for our food systems. We can't even imagine how to do so. We don't even talk about it . So it's easy to condemn corporate fishing or farming but what we should
instead be doing is measuring the carbon footprint of the various food production methods  available and striving to convert our diets to the least damaging. Then we should figure out how to reach perfection.
 

Lurk

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1209 on: July 12, 2018, 08:04:15 AM »
It's an insidious complex interconnected problem across the board. I liked your idea of "instead be doing is measuring the carbon footprint of the various food production methods  available and striving to convert our diets to the least damaging. "

Doesn't need to be perfect merely heading in that direct would be a nice improvement. Eventually, maybe, high carbon food production will go the way of DDT and Thalidomide and become an outlawed activity. Much potential in regenerative agriculture and drawing down CO2 into the soils - it would make a significance difference beyond merely CO2 levels. Change is hard and slow. 
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"The history of the race, and each individual's experience, are thick with evidence that a truth is not hard to kill and that a lie told well is immortal." — Mark Twain

Clare

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1210 on: July 15, 2018, 03:58:59 AM »

This international trade in food is staggering, I'm never ceased to be amazed. Like these sweet peppers in our local supermarket, sometimes we have beef from USA & it is much cheaper than our local grass fed beef (which is exported to USA for burgers!).
On Friday we were in the neighbouring town & called in to a favourite Reduced the Clear shop that always has something that we buy regulalrly anyway but at a lower price here.
(NB Food here is ridicuously expensive so we need to hunt out bargains to balance our budget. Luckily we have a v productive fruit & vege garden)
We came home with flour from Latvia, edam cheese from Austria, spagetti from Turkey.... crazy! This food is close to it's 'use by date' so would otherwise be dumped, that's the only reason I can justify buying it.
Our supermarket chains are Australian owned so a lot of our groceries do come from there but why do we need all this stuff being imported from the other side of the globe. And how do you stop it?
Clare in New Zealand

jacksmith4tx

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1211 on: July 15, 2018, 04:57:01 AM »

This international trade in food is staggering, I'm never ceased to be amazed.

From a review of a book I read some years ago:
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/316767.The_Box
The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger
by Marc Levinson

Nine ways in which shipping has changed the world.

1. All ships, trains, trailers and cranes for freight are built to the exact same standards. On a ship the tolerance on the rails that lock the containers in place is 1/4". It doesn't matter if it is a refrigerated container, a double-doors one or any of the 16 types of container, all are built to the same external and weight bearing parameters. It doesn't matter if it is in Egypt, Sydney or Cape Town, all the ports are built the same way. All cargo is tracked in the same way on computers.

2. The heavily-protective and Marxist trade unions that fought so hard for their workers in places such as New York and London and Liverpool in the UK lost out to ports built specifically for containers that had no prior agreements with dockers (longshoremen). Rotterdam in Holland and Tilbury in England got the business.

3. The merchant navy employed many men on cargo ships. 1,000 yard container ships carry a crew of between 6 and 20 from cheap, non-unionised countries such as the Philippines.

4. Smuggling of illegal items and people became much easier. Searching the boxes and barrels of a cargo ship is one thing. Searching through thousands of containers locked at point of loading and not unlocked until they reach their final destination is quite another.

5. What was once a week long sojourn in port as cargo was unloaded, trucked away and new trucks and trains arrived with more cargo for loading is accomplished in 24 hours. As soon as one set of cranes has cleared an area, another crane is placing on new containers.

6. Because of economies of scale, the reduction in labour costs and the greater efficiency of shipping, freight costs have gone down enormously, so people previously unable to afford certain first-world luxuries now consider them as everyday items.

7. What is designed in one country may be made with fabric from a second, manufactured in a third and distributed in a fourth. The owner of the business might live in a fifth. Goods are manufactured where labour is cheapest.

8. It costs 70% extra to ship an empty container back to its home port. But only 10% to dump it. This has resulted in parks of rusting containers inelegant in their uselessness. There are small industries reusing these containers as homes, bars, even swimming pools and small industrial etc units.

9. And it all started in April 1956 with Mr. Malcom McLean, a trucker turned genius entrepreneur with a vision for globalisation and a refitted oil tanker that carried fifty-eight shipping containers from Newark to Houston.

Economics was crucial. “In 1961, before the container was in international use, ocean freight costs alone accounted for 12 percent of the value of U.S. exports and 10 percent of the value of U.S. imports.”

Science is a thought process, technology will change reality.

jacksmith4tx

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1212 on: July 15, 2018, 04:26:01 PM »
Here is a Big Data project that generates data visualizations on ocean fishing. Even if it only tracks ships that broadcasts certain types of operational data it can use AI to identify suspicious or illegal fishing. It should also be possible to attach machine readable tags on all imported and exported seafood at some point in the future so consumers can make better food choices. I noticed Wall Mart was a sponsor.

http://globalfishingwatch.org/

Definitely check out their research publications.
http://globalfishingwatch.org/publications/
Science is a thought process, technology will change reality.

Bruce Steele

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1213 on: July 18, 2018, 02:37:43 AM »
Pig farmers are losing herds of pigs all across Russia, Poland and many other countries as African Swine Fever spreads now westward. Wild pig populations harbor the disease and moves it across borders.
 Here is a list of cases of virulent animal disease cases worldwide. African Swine Flu is attributed to place , date etc.
 https://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wahid.php/Diseaseinformation/WI

This isn't a problem that disease control can eradicate anytime soon, think decades . This is a disease that can survive meat curing processes and infect wild or domestic pigs that might be fed food scraps .
This is how African Swine Fever moved from Africa to Europe and Russia.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1214 on: July 18, 2018, 02:08:13 PM »
The Flash Drought Brought Misery, but Did It Change Minds on Climate Change?
Ranchers in Divide County, North Dakota, rely on the rain. Last year the rains failed, and the temperature shot up. ‘The crops just didn’t come out of the ground.’
Quote
Drought is an especially wily adversary. As an officer of the North Dakota Department of Emergency Services told me recently, "You can't put up a sandbag wall to stop a drought."

In Divide County, agricultural producers are especially vulnerable to the effects of drought, since they depend on dryland methods. Dryland farmers use no irrigation. Instead, they rely wholly on rain: to initiate the lush growth of little bluestem and other pastureland grasses that will sustain their herds through the summer, and to secure the hay harvest that will get the herd through the winter. Not to mention the rain they need for their wheat, barley and pea cash crops.

In 2017, ranchers were optimistic when they put their cattle out to graze in late spring. There'd been record snowfall over the winter, and regional forecasts weren't calling for any drought conditions in their northwest region of the Great Plains. By May, though, concerns were rising. Rain failed to come, and the good winter moisture evaporated into a cloudless sky. By July, two-thirds of the pastureland in the Dakotas was in poor condition, and across the High Plains, from Kansas up to Canada, temperatures were above normal while precipitation was low—perfect conditions for what's known as a "flash drought," sudden and severe.

By the first of August, the USDA reported that nearly three-quarters of North Dakota's topsoil was desperately bereft of moisture. Part of Divide County was at the most severe drought level, and 60 percent of the state was facing some level of drought. It was the state's fourth-driest summer since record-keeping started in 1895. Ranchers hauled water to their herds and vied for hay donations that flowed in from other regions after the state opened a hay lottery. Anything to supplement the feed of the hungry cattle.

What happened? How had it happened so fast? And would it happen again? ...
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/17072018/flash-drought-north-dakota-cattle-ranchers-auction-hay-shortage-climate-change
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gerontocrat

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1215 on: July 21, 2018, 12:19:28 PM »
Sleepy, the price of bread and potatoes may be going up in Sweden?
All the climate models say that events such as this (or its equally ugly sister, excess rainfall) are and will become more frequent.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jul/20/crop-failure-and-bankruptcy-threaten-farmers-as-drought-grips-europe

Crop failure and bankruptcy threaten farmers as drought grips Europe
Abnormally hot temperatures continue to wreak devastation across northern and central parts of the continent


Quote
Farmers across northern and central Europe are facing crop failure and bankruptcy as one of the most intense regional droughts in recent memory strengthens its grip.

States of emergency have been declared in Latvia and Lithuania, while the sun continues to bake Swedish fields that have received only 12% of their normal rainfall.

The abnormally hot temperatures – which have topped 30C in the Arctic Circle – are in line with climate change trends, according to the World Meteorological Organization. And as about 50 wildfires rage across Sweden, no respite from the heatwave is yet in sight.

Lennart Nilsson, a 55-year-old cattle farmer from Falkenberg near Malmo and co-chair of the Swedish Farmers Association, said it was the worst drought he had experienced.

“This is really serious,” he said. “Most of south-west Sweden hasn’t had rain since the first days of May. A very early harvest has started but yields seem to be the lowest for 25 years – 50% lower, or more in some cases – and it is causing severe losses.”

If no rain comes soon, Nilsson’s association estimates agricultural losses of up to 8bn Swedish kronor (£700m) this year and widespread bankruptcies. The drought would personally cost him around 500,000 kronor (£43,000), Nilsson said, adding that, like most farmers, he is now operating at a loss.

The picture is little different in the Netherlands, where Iris Bouwers, a 25-year-old farmer, said the parched summer had been a “catastrophe” for her farm.

“Older families around me are comparing this to 1976,” she said. “My dad can’t remember any drought like this.” The Bouwerses expect to lose €100,000 this year after a 30% drop in their potato crop. After investing in a pig stable over the winter, the family have no savings to cover the loss.

Asked what she would do, Bouwers just laughed. “Hope and pray,” she said. “There is not much more I can do. I wouldn’t talk about bankruptcy yet, but our deficit will be substantial. It probably means we need to have a very good talk with the bank.”

If anything, the situation is even worse in Poland, Belarus and the Czech Republic, where vegetation stress has taken hold. In parts of Germany, some farmers are reportedly destroying arid crops.

After June was declared the second warmest on record, the European commission pledged to help farmers with a raft of measures, including the temporary suspension of “greening” obligations partly intended to prevent climate change.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"

gerontocrat

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1216 on: July 21, 2018, 12:28:06 PM »
And from "Business Insider" http://uk.businessinsider.com/r-as-wheat-harvest-heads-to-parched-north-europe-braces-for-more-losses-2018-7

As wheat harvest heads to parched north, Europe braces for more losses
Quote
PARIS (Reuters) - Europe's grain market is bracing for more downgrades to the size of this year's wheat crop as harvesting reaches the northern regions that have been worst hit by exceptional drought and heat since spring.

Germany, the European Union's second-largest wheat grower, has been a focus of concern, and comments this week by the country's farming association saying it could not forecast the crop because of uncertainty about weather damage have added to market jitters.

Harvesting is under way in south and central Germany and is spreading north to the regions most badly damaged by dryness.

"I think it pretty likely that the association will cut its forecast of the wheat crop in coming weeks as the harvest results arrive," one German analyst said. "The association cut its forecast of the winter barley sharply after the final northern and eastern areas were gathered where the damage was severest."

The DBV farming association already forecast on July 5 that Germany's winter wheat harvest will fall 15 percent from 2017 to 20.5 million tonnes. It declined to update the number this week but sharply lowered its winter barley crop estimate.

Neighboring Poland is also expected to see a significant drought impact, while harvest rain was now slowing field work.

Poland's wheat output may fall 10 percent from 2017 to about 10 million tonnes, Sparks Polska forecasts.

"The winter wheat harvest started 2-3 weeks earlier than normal, but now it has been hampered by wet weather," Wojtek Sabaranski of the analyst firm said.

As well as slowing field work, rain around harvest time can damage wheat quality, and downpours in southeastern Europe have raised concern that exporting EU members Romania and Bulgaria may have less milling-grade wheat than usual.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"