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Tor Bejnar

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Arctic Maps
« on: July 05, 2013, 03:20:56 PM »
The first map of the Arctic that I found on the internet that included a scale was this National Geographic map:  http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/maps/atlas/arctic-ocean-geopolitical.html.  (The scale is in the upper left corner, to which you may need to scroll.)

There is a Google Map of Greenland (and Nares Strait) with lots of location names here on the ASIF: https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,277.0.html.  This thread has other Greenland area maps referenced as well.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2013, 01:51:37 PM »
Easier to read reference map (with scale) of the Arctic: http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/islands_oceans_poles/arctic_ref802647_1999.jpg

NOAA (The US's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) has a collection of Arctic maps at: http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/maps.html
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2013, 07:14:49 PM »
Maps of Arctic ice, temperature, air pressure, etc., can be found on Neven’s Arctic Sea Ice Graphs (ASIG) page: https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/.  Many maps and graphs link to interesting websites.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2013, 11:33:00 PM »
Weather reports for Arctic towns available from:  http://www.athropolis.com/map2.htm
This map (with a scale) also shows both Inuvik, N.W. Territories and Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, the start and goal for the NW Passage rowers (See https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,387.0.html).  The rowers are not too terribly far from Tuktoyaktuk with reported weather (as an example of what is available from this site):
Weather report as of 25 minutes ago (21:00 UTC):
The wind was blowing at a speed of 6.2 meters per second (13.8 miles per hour) from East/Northeast in Tuktoyaktuk, Canada. The temperature was 15 degrees Celsius (59 degrees Fahrenheit). Air pressure was 1,018 hPa (30.06 inHg). Relative humidity was 54.8%. There were a few clouds at a height of 213 meters (700 feet), a few clouds at a height of 2438 meters (8000 feet) and broken clouds at a height of 6706 meters (22000 feet). The visibility was 24.1 kilometers (15.0 miles).
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2013, 03:40:27 PM »
The Geological Survey of Canada produced a beautiful geological map of the Arctic in 2008.  The ice may come and go, but the rocks change only slowly. :)  PDF or JPEG downloads available: http://geoscan.nrcan.gc.ca/starweb/geoscan/servlet.starweb?path=geoscan/downloade.web&search1=R=287868
« Last Edit: June 22, 2017, 09:51:35 PM by Tor Bejnar »
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2013, 07:35:48 PM »
Fascinating old maps of the Arctic available at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Old_maps_of_the_Arctic

Did you know that in 1595 there was (thought to be) a continent surrounding the North Pole (with high black cliffs!) with four rivers flowing southwards into what we would call the Arctic Ocean (then Icy Sea), and that Nares Strait and Baffin Bay were called Fretum Dauis?  If you can read Latin, there is so much more! (like: 4 foot tall Pygmies whose shouts carry a long way – remember that my Latin is rustier than my Tatar [an insult to rust, sorry to say] so I use Google Translate and guess what letters make up the words)
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Espen

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2013, 11:21:20 PM »
When all this fuzz about Jakobshavn is over, here is how it will look like:
Have a ice day!

Anne

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2013, 12:03:51 AM »
Thanks, Espen. That's wonderful. I love the captions. Do you have a date for it?

Espen

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2013, 12:21:46 AM »
Hi Anne;

Published May 1 1818 by T & J Allman, Princess Street, Hannover Square, London.

Note it is not April 1st ;)
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Anne

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2013, 12:28:38 AM »

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2013, 02:33:59 PM »
A set of Arctic weather maps that almost anybody can comprehend at http://www.weather-forecast.com/maps/Arctic!  (They are not sophisticated.)
10-day forecasts in 6-hour increments for
  • Temperature (land)
  • Clouds (with some wind info)
  • Weather (with little suns, moons and clouds, etc. for where it is day and night, etc.!)
  • Wind
  • Rain & Snow
Watch an animation or select a date/time and look at the various maps available.  Also, current conditions at land-based reporting stations: air temperatures, wind speed/direction, weather (sun/cloud/rain). 

Good luck at finding the little “[Advanced mode]” (includes "significant ocean wave heights" and "tide forecasts") and where you can change from Fahrenheit to Celsius.
 
The current 10-day forecast calls for some snow almost every day on Ellesmere Island, and there are currently 12 foot seas off the southern tip of Greenland. 
Edit:  The "H"s and "L"s on the synoptic maps sure leave something to be desired!  One day the current storm's low pressure  is identified with an "L", the next day the low pressure is identified with an "H"  :(
« Last Edit: August 07, 2013, 03:19:39 PM by Tor Bejnar »
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2013, 06:57:46 PM »
I looked around the NOAA site referenced above (July-8) and note that http://www.seaice.de/ has links to many of the resources known to us (for example, NSIDC's Sea Ice Index, Cryosphere Today and IARC-JAXA). 

The very first bulleted item is for Sea ice data from the University of Hamburg's Integrated Climate Data Center.  One could spend hours and hours reading about climate science here.

One bulleted item reads "Arctic.io Neven's Arctic sea ice blog Arctic sea ice graphs collection"
On close examination, three hyperlinks are offered: two of which are Neven's Arctic Sea Ice Blog and Arctic Sea ice Graphs.  The third hyperlink (http://www.arctic.io/) includes a temperature map (reproduced below) with this description:
New Polar Portal with Sea Ice Temperatures
Aug_09_2013
Just launched this web site of Danish research institutions [-] displays the results of their monitoring efforts in the Arctic. New to me is the above composite of sliding mean temperatures captured by the Metop-A satellite. [hyphen added for clarity (I hope!)]

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2013, 09:14:31 PM »
Should add the sea ice temperature map is actually from polarportal.dk (Danish/English) and mention recently a German/English portal also launched: meereisportal.de

I expect more interesting maps appearing on these sites soon...

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2013, 06:17:26 PM »
http://mondediplo.com/maps/peril
Planet in Peril: Atlas of Current Threats to People and the Environment
Le Monde diplomatique (English Edition)

After a brief intro, the first subtitle in this article about the Atlas is "Polar ice caps melting faster" with a map showing forecasts of September Arctic ice coverage through 2090.
What??? ... Ahh: this was published in 2006 with data from 2005.

So, before 2007, the polar ice caps were "melting faster" and losing ice was the top threat to people (of 15 threats - Global warming was 2nd; health care and 'China' end the list).  Few suspected weather and other things that affect ice conditions could 'conspire' to bring about 2007 and 2012 Arctic ice loss in those 'good old days' when the Arctic was going to keep some ice around for the next 75 years.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2013, 05:34:19 PM »
NSIDC makes it easy to compare a few features for different months and different years:  http://nsidc.org/cgi-bin/bist/bist.pl?annot=1&legend=1&scale=50&tab_cols=3&tab_rows=3&config=seaice_index&submit=Refresh&mo0=07&hemis0=N&img0=conc&mo1=08&hemis1=N&img1=conc&mo2=09&hemis2=N&img2=extn&year0=2007&year1=2012&year2=2013
This link compares 2007, 2012 and 2013 showing July ice concentration, August ice cocentration and September extent.  (Obviously, no data for August and September 2013 yet!)
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #15 on: September 09, 2013, 09:39:21 PM »
Is there an Arctic map that you refer to occasionally that is not referenced here (yet) and is not linked on Neven's ASIG page?  There must be some good ones out there! 

For example: Wipneus’s red & blue daily ice extent change maps are on his “Home brew AMSR2 extent & area calculation” thread http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,382.0.html.  Bi-weekly extent change maps are prepared for Neven’s bi-weekly ASIB updates.  Wipneus posted a really cool annual extent change map today http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2013/09/piomas-september-2013.html?cid=6a0133f03a1e37970b019aff4895ec970b#comment-6a0133f03a1e37970b019aff46f429970d.  Are these gathered anywhere else with public access?
« Last Edit: September 09, 2013, 09:46:22 PM by Tor Bejnar »
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2013, 05:53:36 PM »
Arctic sea ice maps before 1979 are accessible via NSIDC, etc.  See this ASIB entry:
http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2013/09/ipcc-crisis-meeting.html?cid=6a0133f03a1e37970b019aff57dc55970d#comment-6a0133f03a1e37970b019aff57dc55970d
 
I randomly selected a chart (Point Barrow, 9/11/53) and submitted a request and got a  "page not found" response, but the system looks accessible.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2014, 04:48:14 AM »
Neven recently wrote a blog post titled "Sea ice atlas" - http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2014/01/sea-ice-atlas.html.  He starts his description with "Now, this is what I call a cool tool."

Have a look-see if you haven't yet.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2014, 10:29:05 PM »
Artist's Sea Level Rise Map Envisions A World Of New Seas And Coastlines
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/20/sea-level-rise-map_n_4824483.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular

"Martin Vargic, an amateur graphic designer from Slovakia, designed this map that depicts a world after 260 feet of sea level rise."  Map includes polar views,and enlarges quite a bit.


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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2014, 06:19:52 PM »
http://www.meteociel.fr/modeles/gfse_3d.php
BFTV posted this neat "interactive 3D globe for displaying jet stream, 850hPa temperatures, 500hPa heights and SLP forecast animations" elsewhere.  Centered on France, it shows virtually the entire Arctic.

(Doesn't work on Safari, but does on Firefox.)
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Anne

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #20 on: June 11, 2014, 10:43:30 AM »
National Geographic is changing the way it portrays the Arctic, to reflect the decline in the ice cap. The 10th edition will differentiate between multi-year ice and the maximum extent of seasonal ice, and they are using 2012 as the basis for the new representation.



Gizmodo has the story here: Link

NG's own story with video (requires registration) here:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/06/140609-arctic-ice-maps-atlas-tenth-edition-science/?_ga=1.122900104.2047681544.1371579435#

Anne

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #21 on: June 11, 2014, 03:47:59 PM »
The Inuit Pan Arctic Atlas



The Atlas is one of the outcomes of the project “The Northwest Passage and the construction of Inuit pan-Arctic identities” (funded by SSHRC—the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council), and co-directed by Claudio Aporta (Marine Affairs Program, Dalhousie University), Michael Bravo (Geography, University of Cambridge), and Fraser Taylor (Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre, Carleton University). This project looks at Inuit occupancy of the Northwest Passage, through a study and documentation of Inuit traditional trails and place names, which have interconnected Inuit groups across the Arctic since time immemorial.

The two main research questions for this project are:

1. how extensive and significant is the historical Inuit presence along the Northwest Passage? and
2. how interconnected Inuit groups were before Europeans arrived?

This Atlas focuses on historical written evidence of Inuit presence in most of the Canadian Arctic. It contains a selection of material obtained from hundreds of published and unpublished documents produced by explorers, ethnographers and other visitors who were in contact with Inuit during the early contact period or shortly before Inuit moved to permanent settlements. A very significant proportion of those trails and place names are still used today. The Atlas is a database, and the sources can be found through searches, or clicking on the features on the map. Each document has been given a geographic reference (which in some cases, it occupies the whole Canadian Arctic). Whenever possible Inuit place names and trails encountered in the documents were digitized separately.


http://paninuittrails.org/index.html?module=module.about

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #22 on: June 27, 2014, 02:33:07 PM »
Frivolousz21 (in The 2014 Melting Season « Reply #1632 on: Today at 05:15:28 AM »)
posted this color-coded bathymetry map of the Arctic that shows at a glance, among other things, how shallow the Siberian coastal waters are and how deep the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) channels are.

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Anne

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2014, 02:28:23 PM »
Russians discover new island in Laptev Sea.





Admittedly it's not very big, but its previously unknown existence shows how poorly mapped that region remains.

More here:
http://www.adn.com/article/20141117/arctic-satellite-image-week-russia-discovers-new-arctic-island

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #24 on: January 20, 2015, 06:02:49 PM »
Not of the Arctic, but interesting still:
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26803-map-that-changed-the-world-has-its-200th-birthday.html#.VL6G2S4-XOE
Map that changed the world has its 200th birthday

More info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Smith_%28geologist%29

I recently read The Map That Changed the World: William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology by Simon Winchester (published in 2001)
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2015, 01:24:55 PM »
Here's a map of the Arctic from the mid 1800s:
(Let's see if I can attach a jpg file.)
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #26 on: February 12, 2015, 08:04:09 PM »
Here is a weather map used by solartim27 for Greenland and area (including, if you want, Europe and the rest of the world, excluding polar regions): www.windfinder.com/weather-maps/forecast/greenland
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #27 on: March 30, 2015, 02:17:27 PM »
This map (attached), brought to our attention by Sleepy on the 'Jakobshavn Isbræ / Sermeq Kujalleq / Ilulissat Icefjord ' thread on March 20, 2015, is similar to the one Espen shared on July 25, 2013 (above)
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #28 on: April 17, 2015, 05:52:09 PM »
Concerning the Arctic Sea ice Graphs page's forecasts page:

That page is awesome! Thanks, Neven.

EDIT: the whole site is awesome actually! You've done a lot of work on it since a few months ago?


Thanks, slow wing. I update every few months, usually at the start of the melting season. The SLP patterns page was too much work (I figured Concentration maps is enough work already), which is why I've created the Forecasts page. I now only have to complete updating the Concentration maps page before the month is out, and then it's all set for the 2015 melting season.


So, go look at the 'new' http://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/forecasts page,
              Air temperature anomaly
click here to see actual surface air temperatures

and click on the "here" link to see actual temperatures.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #29 on: April 17, 2015, 07:37:57 PM »
From the ASIB: 'real time' ice thickness maps!!!

Boa05att wrote:
Hi Neven, ...
Is this the BBC scoop you were mentioning? :-)
'3D Cryosat' tracks Arctic winter sea ice
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-32348291

Neven replied:
Yes, that's the scoop. CryoSat now has maps!

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Neven

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #30 on: April 18, 2015, 12:03:52 AM »
Thanks, Tor, blog post is up.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #31 on: May 26, 2015, 03:36:35 PM »
The forecast maps aren't working for me on the Arctic Sea ice Graphs site right now, so I looked elsewhere.  I just discovered some lovely animations on DMI:  Ocean Forecast - plots and animations (up to 5 day forecasts).  Selecting the "Arctic Sea" 'Geographical domain', it includes maps/animations for:
  • Surface Temperature
  • Surface Current
  • Sea Level
  • Ice Thickness
  • Ice Concentration
  • Ice Convergence
  • Ice Drift
  • Ice Temperature
  • Icing Index
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #32 on: May 28, 2015, 02:59:16 PM »
from:  The 2015 melting season
« Reply #996 on: Today at 08:09:06 AM »
The ADS/vishop site now has a "Sea Ice Forecast" overlay feature. The images don't copy well to show here... go play with it on their page.

https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/vishop/vishop-monitor.html?N

...
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Neven

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #33 on: June 02, 2015, 03:27:36 PM »
The forecast maps aren't working for me on the Arctic Sea ice Graphs site right now, so I looked elsewhere.

The images were moved to another server. I've adjusted the link addresses. Page is working again.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #34 on: June 09, 2015, 07:24:18 PM »
High-Resolution Global Soil Moisture Map  New, from NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab: Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP).  (White means snow, ice or frozen.)


More info via Through the Sandglass.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #35 on: June 17, 2015, 07:14:02 PM »
If 'functionally ice-free' is defined as the Arctic having less than 106 sq. km. area, then what does 1,000,000 square kilometers look like?  Let's see: pies are square! so it's a circle with a 564 km radius or a semi-circle with a 1596 km diameter.  Attached (I hope) is a map showing the 2012 minimum extent (3.41M sq.km.) with a semicircle that is approximately 1M sq.km. in area. [Edit: replace PDF image with JPG image.]

« Last Edit: July 09, 2015, 08:53:37 PM by Tor Bejnar »
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A-Team

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #36 on: June 17, 2015, 11:29:42 PM »
#25 Here's a map of the Arctic from the mid 1800s:

That map was made by August Petermann in 1865. Its title is 'Karte der Arktischen & Antarktischen Regionen'. There is a nice zoomable version at the first link below and a discussion of Petermann's take on the Gulf Stream and Irminger Current at the second (along with an 1869 update, below).

Petermann was ridiculed in later decades for proposing that warm currents continuing up from the Atlantic and Bering Strait could lead to open water in the central Arctic Ocean. The 1865 map actually has the currents colored red and blue for temperature.

Interestingly, neither map shows any detail in the region of Petermann Glacier in NW Greenland which, though named after him, he never visited.

http://www.themaphouse.com/search_getamap.aspx?id=5757&ref=POLAR229
http://johnmckay.blogspot.com/2010/06/petermanns-polar-lands.html
« Last Edit: June 17, 2015, 11:39:41 PM by A-Team »

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #37 on: July 02, 2015, 08:42:08 PM »
Thanks, A-Team.

Further to my "How big is 1,000,000 sq. km." question, Hudson Bay has a surface area of 1,230,000 square kilometers and a spherical cap from 85N is 979,000 sq. km. (if my calculation is correct).
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #38 on: August 20, 2015, 04:51:53 PM »
Map from early Arctic explorer, Willem Barents (1601). Here be dragons.
The link leads to a Flickr image showing there was open water all the way to the North Pole in 1601 (and dragons).  :D

Arctic Map By William Barents 1588 - more dragons  :), but I'm not certain about open water above 80N :'(
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #39 on: December 21, 2015, 05:59:55 PM »
Arctic Coastal Erosion, Beaufort Sea Coast, AK - click to access 3-minute YouTube presentation.
Uploaded on Jul 29, 2011

Time-lapse series of coastal bluff erosion along the Arctic Coast at Drew Point, Beaufort Sea, Alaska. Coastal erosion rates exceeding 20 meters per year are being observed along the Arctic Coast, and they are especially high along Alaska's Beaufort Sea coastline. Comparison of aerial photos and LANDSAT imagery suggest accelerating erosion rates over the last 50 years. Arctic sea ice coverage has been declining dramatically over the last few decades and record September minima were observed in 2007. These observations suggest a causal relationship between sea ice decline and coastal change. The timelapse movies presented here show that the relative roles of thermal and wave energy may be significant. The bluffs consist of silt and have high ice-content. The thawing of the ice-rich bluffs by relatively warm seawater undermines coastal bluffs, leading to topple failures of discrete blocks defined by ice-wedge polygons. The fine-grained nature of these materials does not function as a protective barrier for incoming waves, so there is not a strong negative feedback on erosion rates, so that coastal erosion rates in this setting are likely to increase with continued Arctic warming.

Research Scientist, Irina Overeem, CSDMS, INSTAAR
Univ. of Colorado Boulder

The legend on the attached map is not clear any way I look at it, but appears to reference annual shores in 2000 through 2005.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #40 on: March 22, 2016, 08:34:25 PM »
From the Svalbard thread (comment #3):
Espen provides this link to a cool map of Spitsbergen and neighboring islands.  The smaller the scale you choose, the greater amount of detail shows. (For example, more words [details] appear on the map when you choose a scale that shows less area.)

And here is a very useful topographic map with glacier names etc.:

http://toposvalbard.npolar.no/

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Espen

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #41 on: March 23, 2016, 08:27:49 PM »
Have a ice day!

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #42 on: March 24, 2016, 12:51:48 PM »
Misanthropen Fjelde?

Snow-capped mountain in Lambert Land. The name is one of a group of five given by the Place Name Committee for dogs used on the 1906-08 Danmark-Ekspeditionen. They replaced names suggested by John Haller. ‘Misanthropen' was an old and rather miserable dog which did not get on with the other dogs in the team.

After the Norwegian–Danish dispute over the sovereignty of parts of East Greenland was settled at the International Court of Justice in The Hague in 1933, the Place Name Committee for Greenland (Stednavneudvalget) was established, and the place names used on existing published maps of Greenland were systematically reviewed and with few exceptions approved in danicised form.

More than 3000 place names were officially approved by the Place Name Committee for use in northern East Greenland up to the end of 1984, after which responsibility passed to the Home-Rule government at Nuuk in Green- land. More than a third of these place names were proposed by members of the expeditions led by the Danish geologist Lauge Koch. The post-war expeditions led by Lauge Koch were almost entirely geological in nature, and the place names given reflect in part geological characteristics of the features named, the animals encountered and events during the expeditions, as well as commemorating the mountains, lakes and other features of the home countries of the participants.

Gnejsnæs: peninsula in SW Lambert Land protruding into Zachariae Isstrøm. Named by John Haller following explorations during Lauge Koch's 1956-58 expeditions, for the rock type (gnejs = gneiss) and naes = village.

http://www.geus.dk/DK/publications/geol-survey-dk-gl-bull/21/Sider/default.aspx
« Last Edit: March 24, 2016, 12:57:03 PM by A-Team »

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #43 on: April 23, 2016, 04:35:20 PM »
A map of Siberia with lots of place names can be found here.  One can zoom in on areas of choice on the linked map (not the attached copy).
« Last Edit: May 03, 2016, 08:02:14 PM by Tor Bejnar »
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #44 on: October 30, 2016, 09:02:26 PM »
I did an internet search for "outrageous Arctic maps" and spied this depressing, but not surprising, glimpse into the future:

Appearantly this is from Pinterest
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TerryM

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #45 on: October 31, 2016, 12:43:57 AM »
Interesting to note that the above map was a product of the ever vigilant cartographers at The Heritage Foundation. Because they see climate change as a hoax, their worries about the Arctic are limited to fearing that evil Russians will attack if we don't remain ever vigilant.


We may remember The Heritage Foundation from their billboard campaign in which they associated climate change believers with Ted Kaczynski,  AKA The Unabomber, and Charles Manson.
http://mediamatters.org/blog/2012/11/28/meet-the-climate-denial-machine/191545


http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php/Heritage_Foundation
Notes that The Heritage Foundation recieved major funding from both the Koch brothers and South Korean Inteligence Service.


If The Heritage Foundation avows that Russia is a problem I'd be more inclined to fear the Irish.


Terry



Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #46 on: October 31, 2016, 03:08:37 AM »
Terry,
Those billboards were from the Heartland Institute, I recall, but your point is well taken.
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TerryM

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #47 on: October 31, 2016, 06:01:27 PM »
Terry,
Those billboards were from the Heartland Institute, I recall, but your point is well taken.


OUCH!!
I saw Heritage Foundation as a source & some blood vessels must have popped in my eyes. :-[


My bad.
Terry

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #48 on: December 01, 2016, 08:27:30 PM »
cross post:
Let there be maps....

Modern day explorers from the Arctic nations of Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Sweden, Norway, Russia, and the United States are setting their sights north to map the seabed and establish sovereign rights to resources in an icy area that just over a decade ago was virtually inaccessible.

http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2016/11/mapping-the-extended-continental-shelf-in-the-arctic/

It will be nice to see actual maps some day!
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic Maps
« Reply #49 on: January 01, 2017, 05:27:33 AM »
It appears I didn't mention here the Windytv.com website with awesome presentations of wind, temperature, waves, precipitation and pressure forecasts.
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.