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Author Topic: Alaska Glaciers  (Read 7310 times)

Sigmetnow

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Alaska Glaciers
« on: July 27, 2013, 05:02:59 PM »
Mendenhall Glacier near Juneau, Alaska, has started to periodically flood the Mendenhall River on which the city sits.

As water builds up in the basin and seeks an outlet, it can actually lift portions of the glacier ever so slightly, and in that lift, the water finds a release. Under the vast pressure of the ice bearing down upon it, the water explodes out into the depths of Mendenhall Lake and from there into the river.

Glaciologists even have a name for the process, which is happening in many places all over the world as climates change: jokulhlaup, an Icelandic word usually translated as “glacier leap.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/23/us/alaska-looks-for-answers-in-glaciers-summer-flood-surges.html?_r=1&
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2013, 04:05:49 PM »
OK, not exactly a glacier.  But a “frozen debris lobe” threatens the Dalton Highway to Prudhoe Bay, and even the trans-Alaskan pipeline itself, above the Arctic Circle.  And it’s moving faster lately -- about an inch a day.

http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/20130813/only-alaska-creeping-frozen-landslide-threatens-critical-highway-and-pipeline
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2015, 07:44:44 PM »
Alaska’s Glaciers Seen as Major Source of Sea Level Rise
The ice that tumbles into the ocean along Alaska’s coastline often makes for dramatic images that show one of the ravages of climate change – melting tidewater glaciers that contribute to sea level rise. But a new study finds that far more meltwater is flowing into the sea from a similar, if less frequently photographed source – inland glaciers.

Compared to their coastal counterparts, inland glaciers account for 95 percent of glacial mass loss due to climate-driven melting, a study published this month in Geophysical Research Letters shows. In fact, researchers found that Alaska’s glaciers are melting so fast that they would cover the state with a 1-foot thick layer of water every seven years.

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/alaska-glaciers-sea-level-rise-19159
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Paddy

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2015, 11:28:40 PM »
Out of curiosity, how many gigatons of ice do Alaska's glaciers contain?

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2015, 12:56:27 AM »
Glaciers cover about 75,000 km2 of Alaska.
If all of Alaska's glaciers melted, sea level would rise ~ 0.05 meters (about 0.16 feet).
Ocean area=165,250,000 sq km
165,250,000 x 0.05 x 10-3 = 8,260 km-3

Results            Unit
8260000000    kilogram
8260000000000    gram
8.26E+15    milligram
8,260,000    ton
18210197710.718    pound (lb)
41300000000000    carrat
1.2747127999495E+14    grain
4.974284874552E+36    atomic mass unit

] = 0.00826 gigatonnes

if my choice of website data, internet calculators and arithmetic skills work right (without checking my work)
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Paddy

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2015, 02:59:34 PM »
Thank you for that analysis!

I suppose the take home message is that Alaska is still a pretty small chunk of the total likely contribution compared to the big boys of Greenland and Antarctica...

abbottisgone

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2016, 09:50:50 AM »
Thank you for that analysis!

I suppose the take home message is that Alaska is still a pretty small chunk of the total likely contribution compared to the big boys of Greenland and Antarctica...
The take home message is Glaciers are the worlds thermometers!

Complex systems are measured by indicators..
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They didn't understand
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baileyrorys

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2016, 12:47:16 AM »
Here's a photo of the Lamplugh Glacier at Johns Hopkins Inlet on July 22nd, 2014.

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/FIZ09Zd_a7zW5LSvuvz-a9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink

solartim27

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2016, 09:53:20 PM »
Lamplugh is in the news again today with a giant landslide
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/06/science/alaska-landslides-glaciers-melt.html?_r=2
Here is an Aqua Gif from 6/23 to 7/4

"An enormous landslide that spread rocky debris more than six miles across a glacier in southeastern Alaska last week was not the first to occur in the area, and certainly will not be the last.

The slide, first noticed by Paul Swanstrom, a sightseeing pilot, on June 28, occurred when part of a mountain gave way near Lamplugh Glacier, in Glacier Bay National Park, about 100 miles northwest of Juneau.

The slide caused seismic tremors that first registered at magnitude 2.9, , according to data from the Alaska Earthquake Center. But that magnitude was computed as if the tremors were from an earthquake. Scientists at the center later recalculated the magnitude and came up with a higher figure, 5.5."
« Last Edit: July 08, 2016, 09:59:00 PM by solartim27 »
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2016, 05:10:48 AM »
More on this landslide from Dr. Dave Petley's July 3 Landslide Blog.

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JimD

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2016, 12:48:52 AM »
Wow.  To have seen that live.
We do not err because truth is difficult to see. It is visible at a glance. We err because this is more comfortable. Alexander Solzhenitsyn

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skanky

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2016, 12:50:17 PM »
More on the above, again, from the same website: http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2016/11/10/planet-labs-lamplugh/

johnm33

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2016, 10:54:22 AM »
I'm beginning to wonder how many of these northern mountains are rubble held together by ice.

skanky

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2016, 10:43:45 AM »

Aporia_filia

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2017, 12:00:40 PM »
I was very surprised when a knowledgable person told me about a >500 meters wave recorded in the 50s. I could not completely believe it till I read this (some in the wiki as well);

http://geology.com/records/biggest-tsunami.shtml

Bruce Steele

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2017, 08:22:27 PM »
https://youtu.be/jwSjKjwkAOY

Thirty two years ago I traveled to Prince William sound to participate in a dive fishery for a herring roe
on kelp fishery about this time of year.  A bush pilot who my wife and I hired took us on a joyride after my wife had gotten the pictures she needed for a magazine article she was writing . He took us to the base of Columbia Glacier and throttled up as he put the small plane just above the water / floating ice field.  He headed straight into a fissure and we were flying inside the Columbia glacier with ice walls a on either side of the wings. He pulled back on the stick and we exited vertically out of the glacier , did a hammerhead and shot straight back into another fissure.  We then exited the glacier back at deck level over the water/ floating ice field.
 It wasn't the craziest thing I did during that fishing season but 14 hour dives in 36 degree water are fishing stories. Maybe this all sounds like a fish story . Anyway the Columbia doesn't calf into the sound like it did back in 1984.  The Prince William Sound herring fishery has only been a small artisanal effort in the decades after the Valdez hit Bligh Rock in 1986.  I read recently a course change to avoid a iceberg field, with origins from Columbia Glacier, was causative in the tankers grounding. The collapse of the herring fishery, the collapse / retreat of the Columbia Glacier, the oil spill and the oil from the North Slope all play interactive parts in this story.

solartim27

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2017, 08:37:41 AM »
Mendenhall Glacier near Juneau, Alaska, has started to periodically flood the Mendenhall River on which the city sits

Nice drone footage from the area
https://youtu.be/-4-RQLHr5wU
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solartim27

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Re: Alaska Glaciers
« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2017, 08:54:09 AM »
Insane footage from Ruth Glacier
https://www.instagram.com/p/BXgNgIFjIr1/
natgeoVideo by @renan_ozturk @sanctityofspace collection // A phenomenon of the Ruth Glacier Alaska. While filming on the glacier @freddiewilkinson noticed a couple hundred ft wide bubbling pool about a mile away from the terminus of the main glacier. The Ruth Glacier is among the thickest glaciers on earth at around 4000ft but is melting fast with the effects of climate change. We have asked a few friends but are still unsure if this is natural or abnormal. The forces seem accelerated these days as water is drawn down 'moulins' or shafts in the glacier only to emerge in such a startling high volume pool so far down valley. The inner workings are a bit of a mystery and scientific study waiting to happen but I can't help but think of it as one of my favorite places bleeding out under a warming planet. For more images of the Alaska range see @renan_ozturk @sanctityofspace. ~ Aerial DP's @camp4collective @ansonfogel @zatzworks
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