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Paddy

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Water management
« on: April 03, 2017, 12:29:15 PM »
I've just read an article suggesting better management of water, green space and wetlands as a means of ameliorating Climate change: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/apr/03/climate-change-water-fossil-fuel

How much mileage do people here think there might be in this approach?

gerontocrat

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Re: Water management
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2019, 12:42:08 PM »
I've just read an article suggesting better management of water, green space and wetlands as a means of ameliorating Climate change: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/apr/03/climate-change-water-fossil-fuel

How much mileage do people here think there might be in this approach?
A long time to get a reply, and the answer is - wetlands ? YES

A good news story for a change. It's the sort of geo-engineering that gets a hoorah!

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/27/it-is-amazing-how-quickly-mother-nature-can-recover-restoring-ukraines-rich-wetlands-aoe
'Mother Nature recovers amazingly fast': reviving Ukraine's rich wetlands
Quote
In the 1970s, 11 earth dams were built on the Sarata and Kogilnik rivers as a crude alternative to footbridges to access the area’s aquifers.

Ornithologist Maxim Yakovlev remembers that prior to the construction of the dams, the local rivers slowly meandered through a rich wetland ecosystem which would store, hold back and slowly release water after heavy rains. “Back then, before the dams, when the ecosystem was functioning properly, we had healthier soil and vegetation,” says Yakovlev, as he skirts the edge of a reeking swamp near the tiny, ancient town of Tatarbunary on the northern fringe of the reserve, a 100-mile (160km) drive south-west of Odessa.

Only 20% of the Danube Delta ecosystem lies within Ukraine, but thanks to the Endangered Landscapes Programme and a modest crowdfunding grant raised by Rewilding Europe in conjunction with the Dam Removal Europe initiative, Ukraine’s portion is growing.

“Just in the last few weeks, as the first dams were removed, we have seen shoals of fish return and otters establishing new territories,” says Yakovlev.

Some 60 miles from Tatarbunary, in the heart of the reserve, another Rewilding Ukraine project is taking shape on the island of Ermakov. Biologists are studying how the introduction of large herbivores regulates and improves wetland ecosystems.

From a boat on the water, Rewilding Ukraine team leader Mykhailo Nesterenko points to the shoreline. There, fleetingly, we get our first glimpse of some of the dozens of wild konik, a breed of primitive Polish horse that was reintroduced to the island earlier this year. “These large herbivores will play a very important role in the Ermakov ecosystem,” explains Nesterenko, “and we will be bringing other creatures to the island soon, including kulan donkeys.”

On the island, a wooden bird-watching platform allows us to observe huge flocks of geese, ducks, and other fowl landing and taking off from shallow waters teeming with noisy frogs. “The viewing platform was built in the summer. From up here you can see how much has changed since we removed some of the dams,” Nesterenko says.

The island is also home to 17 water buffalo, and a recently born calf. The water buffalo are standing 100 metres away, munching on hay from a wooden wagon near the soon-to-open building that will host rewilding tourists.

Nesterenko says they were gifted by a German eco-entrepreneur, Michel Jacobi, who reared the animals on his farm near Khust in Ukraine’s Carpathian region, where he produces mozzarella cheese from the buffalo milk. The buffalo arrived on a barge in the summer and have settled in well, but with winter beginning they are being given extra food and carefully monitored.

Although they are tame, they are still able to live in the wild and their wallowing habits will improve the wetlands immensely, Nesterenko says. “These animals are one of nature’s great engineers and they open up the scrub and reedbeds, creating pools and puddles which are home to many insects, amphibians and fish.”
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vox_mundi

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Re: Water management
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2021, 05:56:57 PM »
US West Prepares for Possible 1st Water Shortage Declaration
https://phys.org/news/2021-04-west-1st-shortage-declaration.html

The man-made lakes that store water supplying millions of people in the U.S. West and Mexico are projected to shrink to historic lows in the coming months, dropping to levels that could trigger the federal government's first-ever official shortage declaration and prompt cuts in Arizona and Nevada.

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation released 24-month projections this week forecasting that less Colorado River water will cascade down from the Rocky Mountains through Lake Powell and Lake Mead and into the arid deserts of the U.S. Southwest and the Gulf of California. Water levels in the two lakes are expected to plummet low enough for the agency to declare an official shortage for the first time, threatening the supply of Colorado River water that growing cities and farms rely on.

It comes as climate change means less snowpack flows into the river and its tributaries, and hotter temperatures parch soil and cause more river water to evaporate as it streams through the drought-plagued American West.

The agency's models project Lake Mead will fall below 1,075 feet (328 meters) for the first time in June 2021. That's the level that prompts a shortage declaration under agreements negotiated by seven states that rely on Colorado River water: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

If projections don't improve by August, the Bureau of Reclamation will declare a Level 1 shortage condition. The cuts would be implemented in January.

Arizona, Nevada and Mexico have voluntarily given up water under a drought contingency plan for the river signed in 2019. A shortage declaration would subject the two U.S. states to their first mandatory reductions. Both rely on the Colorado River more than any other water source, and Arizona stands to lose roughly one-third of its supply.

The Bureau of Reclamation also projected that Lake Mead will drop to the point they worried in the past could threaten electricity generation at Hoover Dam. The hydropower serves millions of customers in Arizona, California and Nevada.

"As the elevation declines at the lake, then our ability to produce power declines as well because we have less water pushing on the turbines," he said.

"Rural economies in Arizona and Nevada live and die by the hydropower that is produced at Hoover Dam. It might not be a big deal to NV Energy," he said of Nevada's largest utility. "It might be a decimal point to Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. But for Lincoln County, it adds huge impact."



-------------------------------------------

https://mead.uslakes.info/level.asp

... Based on current inflow forecasts, the current projected end of water year total Colorado Basin reservoir storage for water year 2021 is approximately 24.60 maf (41 percent of total system capacity).
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Riverside

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Re: Water management
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2021, 11:35:32 PM »
Long time lurker here, de-cloaking for the first. Let's see whether I can this work.

I'd like to make a correction/clarification to the phys.org/news article that stated that projections showed Lake Mead will drop below 1075 ft for the first time. Actually Lake Mead was briefly lower than that in June 2015 and again in May, June and July 2016.
https://www.arachnoid.com/NaturalResources/
I believe those lower levels and similar low water conditions in Lake Powell put an end to the mythology that there would always be enough Colorado River water to go around, forcing the river compact states to negotiate (read that as "fight rigorously about") the 2019 agreement that set actual official criteria for restricting withdrawals.
So I believe the headline should read "water shortage declaration possible for the first time" based on projections that water levels will drop below 1075. See reply #41 in the Drought 2021 thread.
Current projections for Lake Powell indicate that additional changes to upstream reservoir management will be implemented by 2022.
For graphs of water levels in selected Colorado River reservoirs for the most recent 6 years see
https://lakepowell.water-data.com/
« Last Edit: April 19, 2021, 02:42:15 AM by Riverside »

kassy

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Re: Water management
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2021, 03:52:26 PM »
Welcome Riverside.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Water management
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2021, 04:00:07 PM »
California
Nestle told to stop spring water diversions in San Bernardino Forest
Quote
California's Water Resources Control Board on Friday asked Nestle (NESN.S) to stop unauthorized natural spring water diversions in the San Bernardino Forest after a probe revealed multiple violations and depletion of resources.

The action comes as the state ramps up efforts to preserve water resources amid worsening drought conditions.

The order is in response to several water rights complaints and an online petition against Nestle Waters North America starting in 2015, which led to drinking water supply shortages and impacted environmental resources.

Nestle, one of the world's largest bottled water companies, has 20 days to respond to the draft cease and desist order and request a hearing or the State Water Board may issue a final order, the board said.

The company may be asked to limit diversions from surface streams to its pre-1914 water rights and submit annual monitoring reports, among other steps, if the order is adopted, it said. ...
https://www.reuters.com/business/environment/nestle-asked-stop-spring-water-diversions-san-bernardino-2021-04-23/
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gerontocrat

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Re: Water management
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2021, 04:51:00 PM »
Long time lurker here, de-cloaking for the first. Let's see whether I can this work.

I'd like to make a correction/clarification to the phys.org/news article that stated that projections showed Lake Mead will drop below 1075 ft for the first time. Actually Lake Mead was briefly lower than that in June 2015 and again in May, June and July 2016.
https://www.arachnoid.com/NaturalResources/
I believe those lower levels and similar low water conditions in Lake Powell put an end to the mythology that there would always be enough Colorado River water to go around, forcing the river compact states to negotiate (read that as "fight rigorously about") the 2019 agreement that set actual official criteria for restricting withdrawals.
So I believe the headline should read "water shortage declaration possible for the first time" based on projections that water levels will drop below 1075. See reply #41 in the Drought 2021 thread.
Current projections for Lake Powell indicate that additional changes to upstream reservoir management will be implemented by 2022.
For graphs of water levels in selected Colorado River reservoirs for the most recent 6 years see
https://lakepowell.water-data.com/
Thanks for that post, Riverside, a long time ago I used to look at water resources a lot.
Your post woke me up about data sources.

Always helpful to have more than one place to go for data, so here is another one for Lake Mead---  http://mead.uslakes.info/level.asp
Looks like it is updated daily.

At the moment 2021 not as bad as 2016, but.....in the long term the future seems one-way (see article in link below.

https://yaleclimateconnections.org/2021/01/drought-stricken-colorado-river-basin-could-see-additional-20-drop-in-water-flow-by-2050/

click image to enlarge
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Water management
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2021, 08:35:01 PM »
In a different water basin, my brother in central New Mexico says the Rio Grande will be low again this summer (low southern Colorado snow pack, plus, they 'owe' water to Texas) and there are plans to stop feeding the area irrigation ditches early this year.  Therefore, my brother's 3.5 acre (1.4 hectare) farm will mostly not be planted.  No okra for the farmers market or grain for the sandhill cranes:'( (My aging mother has loved seeing the cranes nearly every day through recent falls and winters from her 'mother-in-law' apartment window or her wheelchair on the veranda.)

A late start and an early end to the irrigation season

Quote
A less than desirable Rio Grande stream forecast for 2021 has prompted Interstate Stream Commission and State Engineer John D’Antonio Jr. to issue a report telling farmers not to farm unless they “absolutely need to farm.” D’Antonio also said the drought is shaping up to be as severe as the conditions the state experienced in the 1950s.
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Riverside

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Re: Water management
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2021, 11:23:25 PM »
I agree that at the moment Lake Mead's water levels are not as bad as 2016, being about 3.5 ft higher now. But currently Lake Powell is much worse than 2016, being about 30 ft lower.
http://powell.uslakes.info/level.asp
And given the larger size of Lake Powell that's a lot more water.

My cynical guess is that after 2016 the water managers sacrificed Lake Powell's water to maintain Lake Mead above the 1075 ft action level that would trigger some real conservation, while at the same time managing upstream water releases to assure that Lake Powell was above 3575 ft on 1 January each year, to avoid triggering the Mid-Elevation Release Tier management plan for the upper Colorado. This year they barely made it. Next year not likely.

See https://www.usbr.gov/uc/water/crsp/cs/gcd.html for monthly updates (released mid-month) on Lake Powell's water situation and links to 2 year water level projections.


oren

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Re: Water management
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2021, 06:19:04 PM »
Thanks for these informative updates, Riverside.