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Sigmetnow

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New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« on: July 23, 2020, 07:42:06 PM »
Culture, habits, and availability drive what foods we eat and how we produce them.  But AGW and new technologies are inspiring new options.

This article is more to the point in this topic than the Vegan thread.

KFC has teamed up with a Russian biotech company to 3D-print chicken nuggets
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According to a recent press release, KFC wants to become a "restaurant of the future" by "crafting the 'meat of the future,'" with help from a Russian company called 3D Bioprinting Solutions. This initiative, "arose among partners in response to the growing popularity of a healthy lifestyle and nutrition, the annual increase in demand for alternatives to traditional meat and the need to develop more environmentally friendly methods of food production."

If all goes to plan — which is definitely a thing that happens in the Hell Year 2020 — KFC will begin to sell the world's first lab-grown chicken nuggets in Moscow in the fall.

These lab-grown nuggies will of course still feature the same blend of 11 spices and herbs that made them famous, while combining chicken cells with plant material, "allowing it to reproduce the taste and texture of chicken meat almost without involving animals in the process." It's not clear if they'll be vegan friendly, or if they're meant to vaguely compete with fully plant-based meats like the Beyond or Impossible Burger.

The press releases — shared verbatim across companies — includes some thoughts on the project's environmental sustainability as well:

Biomeat has exactly the same microelements as the original product, while excluding various additives that are used in traditional farming and animal husbandry, creating a cleaner final product. Cell-based meat products are also more ethical – the production process does not cause any harm to animals. Along with that, KFC remains committed to continuous improvement in animal welfare from the farm and through all aspects of our supply chain, including raising, handling, transportation and processing.

Also, according to a study by the American Environmental Science & Technology Journal, the technology of growing meat from cells has minimal negative impact on the environment, allowing energy consumption to be cut by more than half, greenhouse gas emissions to be reduced 25 fold and 100 times less land to be used than traditional farm-based meat production. ...
https://boingboing.net/2020/07/20/kfc-has-teamed-up-with-a-russi.html
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Sigmetnow

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Re: New or Alternative Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2020, 09:03:38 PM »
“Beef is clearly declining as a percentage of total meat production, from 39% in 1961 to only 20% in 2018. Pork is exactly the same percentage of total meat production now as it was in 1961: 35%. All of the growth has come from chicken, which has more than tripled from 11% to 34% of total meat production.”

The World Is Finally Losing Its Taste for Meat
Production is projected to dip for the second year in a row, and there’s reason to believe we’re already falling out of love with beef.
August 8, 2020
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Global consumption of animal proteins has been rising, apparently inexorably, for the past six decades. The coronavirus pandemic has finally changed that trajectory.

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that meat production—a decent proxy for consumption—dropped in 2019, and it forecasts a decline again this year. Last year was only the second since 1961 in which production fell; two consecutive years of decline is unprecedented and could be the start of something durable. We’re already at peak pasture as far as demand is concerned, and it looks like we’re also approaching peak beef, even in places like steak-crazed Brazil.
...
But by any number of measures, beef consumption looks very near its peak, and the investors betting more than $1 billion on alternative proteins this year are hoping that their portfolio companies can drive meat demand down further. For now though, the easiest and the nearest-term solution for reducing land use emissions is simply to use less land. Substituting chicken for beef does this already on the margin; a measurable shift away from beef consumption could take that trend much further. …
https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2020-07-30/good-news-for-climate-change-as-world-loses-its-taste-for-meat
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Sigmetnow

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Re: New or Alternative Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2021, 09:33:36 PM »
Quote
ESA Technology
How #SpaceBurgers could be on the menu for future astronauts, thanks to the use of celluar agriculture to produce #CulturedMeat esa.int/ESA_Multimedia…
https://twitter.com/esa_tech/status/1399769002394722316
6/1/21
⬇️ Image below. Click to embiggen.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2021, 08:44:30 PM »
Space agencies are learning how to make food on Mars and the moon
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Space agencies from various countries have spent decades developing the technologies necessary to bring farming indoors, and now the German space agency and NASA are pushing the state-of-the-art of soil-free gardening to its limits with a greenhouse in Antarctica and laying the groundwork for their next act: farming systems where the farmers are optional.

Building on Soviet research, NASA funded a variety of agricultural programs in the 1980s and 1990s. In a collaboration with the University of Wisconsin, researchers discovered that they could replace hot and cumbersome incandescent grow lights with a particular blend of LED lights. Red LEDs, which were more energy efficient, let plants photosynthesize. But plants also needed blue light, or they would grow too tall and spindly. The work led to a patent, and today’s indoor farms often feed plants on a similar diet of red and blue photons — which is why indoor farms often appear bathed in purple light.

Focusing on ways to sustainably meet the ever-growing demand for food, companies around indoor vertical farming has seen a boom in recent years. New York-based start-up Bowery Farming announced a $300 million funding round in June, the largest in the industry thus far, valuing the company at $2.3 billion. Kimbal Musk, brother of Elon Musk, is the co-founder of Square Roots. Newark-based AeroFarms in April broke ground on a 136,000-square-foot-farm in Virginia set to open in 2022 that it says will be the largest aeroponic indoor vertical farm in the world.

The EDEN-ISS Antarctic greenhouse, now entering its fourth growing season, continues to prove that you do not need fertile ground or even sunlight to produce vegetables. It builds upon the LED blend pioneered by the early NASA experiments to deliver “recipes” tuned to the needs of each specific vegetable with programmable arrays of red and blue lights.

Roots poke through beds of fibrous minerals and dangle into empty trays below, where automated nozzles spray them with a nutrient-rich mist every few seconds. Water is largely recycled, except when the nutrient solution gets depleted and needs to be dumped and replaced every few months. The entire system plugs into the neighboring German Neumeyer III research station, from which it continuously draws about 10 kilowatts of power — comparable to eight U.S. households.

The first year, a DLR researcher named Paul Zabel ran the 135-square-foot greenhouse and collected nearly 600 pounds of veggies including cucumbers, lettuces, other leafy greens, tomatoes, radishes and herbs.

And developing the ability to farm in space isn’t purely about going to Mars. A two-way street has always connected space agriculture with industrial agriculture. As climate change makes many areas of the globe less suitable for farming, the technology to split food production from weather and natural resources will likely become more essential.

“My dream would be that we all live in ecological biospheres on our own,” Schubert says. “We would be completely independent from the planet Earth, and we would leave Earth to its own so it can recover.”
https://www.cnbc.com/2021/06/20/space-agencies-are-learning-how-to-farm-on-mars-and-the-moon.html
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vox_mundi

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Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2021, 09:14:33 PM »
Producing Milk from Yeast That Looks and Tastes Like Cow's Milk
https://phys.org/news/2021-01-yeast-cow.amp

The initiators of the development believe that in the not-too-distant future we will be able to buy dairy products in the supermarket that are identical in taste and color to the ordinary dairy products that we consume today, but with one small difference: the dairy products will be produced from yeast rather than from cow.

This product is not a milk substitute like almond or soymilk. We plan to produce dairy products that will be identical to products that come from animals by introducing the yeast genome the genes that code for milk development in cows"

https://perfectdayfoods.com/process/

https://perfectdayfoods.com/find-us/
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vox_mundi

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Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2021, 12:31:29 AM »
Real Cheese, No Animals: More Than 70% of Consumers Want Breakthrough Cheese
https://phys.org/news/2021-06-real-cheese-animals-consumers-breakthrough.html

Precision-fermentation company Formo and the University of Bath have co-published the first large-scale study of consumer acceptance for animal-free dairy products.

Researchers surveyed 5,054 individuals from Brazil, Germany, India, the UK, and the US to understand what consumers think of animal-free dairy products.

Precision fermentation is a process that allows specific proteins to be produced via microorganisms. By inserting a copied stretch of cow DNA, microorganisms produce milk proteins. The process is more efficient than using animals to make proteins, and avoids the negative side effects of industrial animal agriculture, which is responsible for 18% of all greenhouse gas emissions.

The findings of the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, show that consumers around the world are ready for cheese made from real milk proteins produced by microorganisms.

... "Just as we have seen plant-based milk taking an increasing share of the milk market in recent years, we now see that consumers are ready for a new kind of animal-free dairy cheese product." Christopher Bryant, Ph.D., of the University of Bath, said.

Oscar Zollman Thomas et al, Don't Have a Cow, Man: Consumer Acceptance of Animal-Free Dairy Products in Five Countries, Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems (2021)
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fsufs.2021.678491
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Bruce Steele

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Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2021, 02:42:04 AM »
Voxmundi, Protein from microbes is like all things food ,dependent on price. Protein alone doesn’t make cheese. I don’t know where the microbe cheese will get it’s fat or calcium but how those are obtained will also affect nutrition and costs of the final product.
 If they can make cheap microbe protein then pigs will get it in their diets too.
 I saw where DHA could be enhanced in pigs fed mackerel or tuna. Feeding natural products like passed date canned mackerel , barley not up to beer barley standards, pea culls, or field gleaned squash is all feeding products after humans rejected them for some reason. The quality of the feed does affect the quality of the meat produced as well as the nutritive value for the end consumer. But IMO natural sources are healthier because there is a lot we don’t know as much as we should about how food choices affect disease or health.
 So just because you can make microbe cheese doesn’t mean it will deliver the same nutritive value of real cheese. Just because you can raise a pig on a high protein soy diet and mineral, vitamins, and corn doesn’t mean the quality or food value is the same as Belota Jamon.
 You can get your DHA from fish or Cultured DHA but culture is expensive.

etienne

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Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2021, 06:51:04 AM »
Regarding Sigmetnow's article, I just want to say that I don't believe that an experiment in Antartica can be repeated in other parts of the world. In Antartica, there is just nothing that could interfere with the growing process. When I see how many problems I have to grow my own vegetables in a real life environment, I feel that creating similar condition to the Antartica greenhouse would require a very high level of intervention (chemical, mechanical...) to get a world with just the right components and life.
Same thing when producing milk with yeast. I wonder how easily the production site could get out of balance and which chemicals would have to be used to make sure the product is clean. A cow is a self regulated factory, maintenance is quite easy compared to a food producing factory.

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Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2021, 08:21:51 AM »
<snip>
The quality of the feed does affect the quality of the meat produced as well as the nutritive value for the end consumer. But IMO natural sources are healthier because there is a lot we don’t know as much as we should about how food choices affect disease or health.

Thank you Bruce for this.
Protein isn't everything. Bring on the trace minerals and metals and all the other trace nutritional elements.
The same goes for healthy soil (not the protein of course). Artificial fertilisers don't add these.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2021, 03:24:53 PM »
Bruce wrote:
Quote
I don’t know where the microbe cheese will get it’s fat or calcium but how those are obtained will also affect nutrition and costs of the final product.

That’s a good point.  However, for example: pizza is generally not sought out for its high nutritional value — and lower-fat pizza would be a good thing.  In impoverished countries, people are desperate to get maintenance calories in any form.  So I would say a system that increases the supply of tasty food protein, without increasing animal suffering and carbon footprint, could be very beneficial.
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