Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods  (Read 1883 times)

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 20409
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 971
  • Likes Given: 335
New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« on: July 23, 2020, 07:42:06 PM »
Culture, habits, and availability drive what foods we eat and how we produce them.  But AGW and new technologies are inspiring new options.

This article is more to the point in this topic than the Vegan thread.

KFC has teamed up with a Russian biotech company to 3D-print chicken nuggets
Quote
According to a recent press release, KFC wants to become a "restaurant of the future" by "crafting the 'meat of the future,'" with help from a Russian company called 3D Bioprinting Solutions. This initiative, "arose among partners in response to the growing popularity of a healthy lifestyle and nutrition, the annual increase in demand for alternatives to traditional meat and the need to develop more environmentally friendly methods of food production."

If all goes to plan — which is definitely a thing that happens in the Hell Year 2020 — KFC will begin to sell the world's first lab-grown chicken nuggets in Moscow in the fall.

These lab-grown nuggies will of course still feature the same blend of 11 spices and herbs that made them famous, while combining chicken cells with plant material, "allowing it to reproduce the taste and texture of chicken meat almost without involving animals in the process." It's not clear if they'll be vegan friendly, or if they're meant to vaguely compete with fully plant-based meats like the Beyond or Impossible Burger.

The press releases — shared verbatim across companies — includes some thoughts on the project's environmental sustainability as well:

Biomeat has exactly the same microelements as the original product, while excluding various additives that are used in traditional farming and animal husbandry, creating a cleaner final product. Cell-based meat products are also more ethical – the production process does not cause any harm to animals. Along with that, KFC remains committed to continuous improvement in animal welfare from the farm and through all aspects of our supply chain, including raising, handling, transportation and processing.

Also, according to a study by the American Environmental Science & Technology Journal, the technology of growing meat from cells has minimal negative impact on the environment, allowing energy consumption to be cut by more than half, greenhouse gas emissions to be reduced 25 fold and 100 times less land to be used than traditional farm-based meat production. ...
https://boingboing.net/2020/07/20/kfc-has-teamed-up-with-a-russi.html
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 20409
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 971
  • Likes Given: 335
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2020, 09:03:38 PM »
“Beef is clearly declining as a percentage of total meat production, from 39% in 1961 to only 20% in 2018. Pork is exactly the same percentage of total meat production now as it was in 1961: 35%. All of the growth has come from chicken, which has more than tripled from 11% to 34% of total meat production.”

The World Is Finally Losing Its Taste for Meat
Production is projected to dip for the second year in a row, and there’s reason to believe we’re already falling out of love with beef.
August 8, 2020
Quote
Global consumption of animal proteins has been rising, apparently inexorably, for the past six decades. The coronavirus pandemic has finally changed that trajectory.

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that meat production—a decent proxy for consumption—dropped in 2019, and it forecasts a decline again this year. Last year was only the second since 1961 in which production fell; two consecutive years of decline is unprecedented and could be the start of something durable. We’re already at peak pasture as far as demand is concerned, and it looks like we’re also approaching peak beef, even in places like steak-crazed Brazil.
...
But by any number of measures, beef consumption looks very near its peak, and the investors betting more than $1 billion on alternative proteins this year are hoping that their portfolio companies can drive meat demand down further. For now though, the easiest and the nearest-term solution for reducing land use emissions is simply to use less land. Substituting chicken for beef does this already on the margin; a measurable shift away from beef consumption could take that trend much further. …
https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2020-07-30/good-news-for-climate-change-as-world-loses-its-taste-for-meat
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 20409
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 971
  • Likes Given: 335
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2021, 09:33:36 PM »
Quote
ESA Technology
How #SpaceBurgers could be on the menu for future astronauts, thanks to the use of celluar agriculture to produce #CulturedMeat esa.int/ESA_Multimedia…
https://twitter.com/esa_tech/status/1399769002394722316
6/1/21
⬇️ Image below. Click to embiggen.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 20409
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 971
  • Likes Given: 335
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2021, 08:44:30 PM »
Space agencies are learning how to make food on Mars and the moon
Quote
Space agencies from various countries have spent decades developing the technologies necessary to bring farming indoors, and now the German space agency and NASA are pushing the state-of-the-art of soil-free gardening to its limits with a greenhouse in Antarctica and laying the groundwork for their next act: farming systems where the farmers are optional.

Building on Soviet research, NASA funded a variety of agricultural programs in the 1980s and 1990s. In a collaboration with the University of Wisconsin, researchers discovered that they could replace hot and cumbersome incandescent grow lights with a particular blend of LED lights. Red LEDs, which were more energy efficient, let plants photosynthesize. But plants also needed blue light, or they would grow too tall and spindly. The work led to a patent, and today’s indoor farms often feed plants on a similar diet of red and blue photons — which is why indoor farms often appear bathed in purple light.

Focusing on ways to sustainably meet the ever-growing demand for food, companies around indoor vertical farming has seen a boom in recent years. New York-based start-up Bowery Farming announced a $300 million funding round in June, the largest in the industry thus far, valuing the company at $2.3 billion. Kimbal Musk, brother of Elon Musk, is the co-founder of Square Roots. Newark-based AeroFarms in April broke ground on a 136,000-square-foot-farm in Virginia set to open in 2022 that it says will be the largest aeroponic indoor vertical farm in the world.

The EDEN-ISS Antarctic greenhouse, now entering its fourth growing season, continues to prove that you do not need fertile ground or even sunlight to produce vegetables. It builds upon the LED blend pioneered by the early NASA experiments to deliver “recipes” tuned to the needs of each specific vegetable with programmable arrays of red and blue lights.

Roots poke through beds of fibrous minerals and dangle into empty trays below, where automated nozzles spray them with a nutrient-rich mist every few seconds. Water is largely recycled, except when the nutrient solution gets depleted and needs to be dumped and replaced every few months. The entire system plugs into the neighboring German Neumeyer III research station, from which it continuously draws about 10 kilowatts of power — comparable to eight U.S. households.

The first year, a DLR researcher named Paul Zabel ran the 135-square-foot greenhouse and collected nearly 600 pounds of veggies including cucumbers, lettuces, other leafy greens, tomatoes, radishes and herbs.

And developing the ability to farm in space isn’t purely about going to Mars. A two-way street has always connected space agriculture with industrial agriculture. As climate change makes many areas of the globe less suitable for farming, the technology to split food production from weather and natural resources will likely become more essential.

“My dream would be that we all live in ecological biospheres on our own,” Schubert says. “We would be completely independent from the planet Earth, and we would leave Earth to its own so it can recover.”
https://www.cnbc.com/2021/06/20/space-agencies-are-learning-how-to-farm-on-mars-and-the-moon.html
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

vox_mundi

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 6383
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3006
  • Likes Given: 521
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2021, 09:14:33 PM »
Producing Milk from Yeast That Looks and Tastes Like Cow's Milk
https://phys.org/news/2021-01-yeast-cow.amp

The initiators of the development believe that in the not-too-distant future we will be able to buy dairy products in the supermarket that are identical in taste and color to the ordinary dairy products that we consume today, but with one small difference: the dairy products will be produced from yeast rather than from cow.

This product is not a milk substitute like almond or soymilk. We plan to produce dairy products that will be identical to products that come from animals by introducing the yeast genome the genes that code for milk development in cows"

https://perfectdayfoods.com/process/

https://perfectdayfoods.com/find-us/
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― anonymous

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 6383
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3006
  • Likes Given: 521
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2021, 12:31:29 AM »
Real Cheese, No Animals: More Than 70% of Consumers Want Breakthrough Cheese
https://phys.org/news/2021-06-real-cheese-animals-consumers-breakthrough.html

Precision-fermentation company Formo and the University of Bath have co-published the first large-scale study of consumer acceptance for animal-free dairy products.

Researchers surveyed 5,054 individuals from Brazil, Germany, India, the UK, and the US to understand what consumers think of animal-free dairy products.

Precision fermentation is a process that allows specific proteins to be produced via microorganisms. By inserting a copied stretch of cow DNA, microorganisms produce milk proteins. The process is more efficient than using animals to make proteins, and avoids the negative side effects of industrial animal agriculture, which is responsible for 18% of all greenhouse gas emissions.

The findings of the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, show that consumers around the world are ready for cheese made from real milk proteins produced by microorganisms.

... "Just as we have seen plant-based milk taking an increasing share of the milk market in recent years, we now see that consumers are ready for a new kind of animal-free dairy cheese product." Christopher Bryant, Ph.D., of the University of Bath, said.

Oscar Zollman Thomas et al, Don't Have a Cow, Man: Consumer Acceptance of Animal-Free Dairy Products in Five Countries, Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems (2021)
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fsufs.2021.678491
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― anonymous

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Bruce Steele

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2050
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 586
  • Likes Given: 29
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2021, 02:42:04 AM »
Voxmundi, Protein from microbes is like all things food ,dependent on price. Protein alone doesn’t make cheese. I don’t know where the microbe cheese will get it’s fat or calcium but how those are obtained will also affect nutrition and costs of the final product.
 If they can make cheap microbe protein then pigs will get it in their diets too.
 I saw where DHA could be enhanced in pigs fed mackerel or tuna. Feeding natural products like passed date canned mackerel , barley not up to beer barley standards, pea culls, or field gleaned squash is all feeding products after humans rejected them for some reason. The quality of the feed does affect the quality of the meat produced as well as the nutritive value for the end consumer. But IMO natural sources are healthier because there is a lot we don’t know as much as we should about how food choices affect disease or health.
 So just because you can make microbe cheese doesn’t mean it will deliver the same nutritive value of real cheese. Just because you can raise a pig on a high protein soy diet and mineral, vitamins, and corn doesn’t mean the quality or food value is the same as Belota Jamon.
 You can get your DHA from fish or Cultured DHA but culture is expensive.

etienne

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1337
    • View Profile
    • About energy
  • Liked: 234
  • Likes Given: 5
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2021, 06:51:04 AM »
Regarding Sigmetnow's article, I just want to say that I don't believe that an experiment in Antartica can be repeated in other parts of the world. In Antartica, there is just nothing that could interfere with the growing process. When I see how many problems I have to grow my own vegetables in a real life environment, I feel that creating similar condition to the Antartica greenhouse would require a very high level of intervention (chemical, mechanical...) to get a world with just the right components and life.
Same thing when producing milk with yeast. I wonder how easily the production site could get out of balance and which chemicals would have to be used to make sure the product is clean. A cow is a self regulated factory, maintenance is quite easy compared to a food producing factory.

nanning

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2484
  • 0Kg CO₂, 37 KWh/wk,125L H₂O/wk, No offspring
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 269
  • Likes Given: 22699
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2021, 08:21:51 AM »
<snip>
The quality of the feed does affect the quality of the meat produced as well as the nutritive value for the end consumer. But IMO natural sources are healthier because there is a lot we don’t know as much as we should about how food choices affect disease or health.

Thank you Bruce for this.
Protein isn't everything. Bring on the trace minerals and metals and all the other trace nutritional elements.
The same goes for healthy soil (not the protein of course). Artificial fertilisers don't add these.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 20409
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 971
  • Likes Given: 335
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2021, 03:24:53 PM »
Bruce wrote:
Quote
I don’t know where the microbe cheese will get it’s fat or calcium but how those are obtained will also affect nutrition and costs of the final product.

That’s a good point.  However, for example: pizza is generally not sought out for its high nutritional value — and lower-fat pizza would be a good thing.  In impoverished countries, people are desperate to get maintenance calories in any form.  So I would say a system that increases the supply of tasty food protein, without increasing animal suffering and carbon footprint, could be very beneficial.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Eco-Author

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 201
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 21
  • Likes Given: 116
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2021, 02:23:32 AM »
As always, in-door/year-round hydroponic growing not only protects crops from insects (near zero pesticides), weather extremes but uses 95% less water... Every apartment tower, to me, should have at least the top floor dedicated to this if not the entire south side: https://newsus.cgtn.com/news/2021-08-15/The-Next-Solutions-Episode-1-Farm-is-the-new-lab-12JAB2Pihl6/index.html?fbclid=IwAR2c5j8MGKYZZxNv0AtLi5-2V9MNtgSstxXSSadLaFiHKgk6OFXt1E14x-s
Self-sufficiency and Durability to disasters are the absolute keys to nearly any disaster you can think of such as War, economic collapse, pandemics, Global warming, quakes, volcanoes, Hurricanes... all of which put solar farms etc. and power grids at risk!

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 20409
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 971
  • Likes Given: 335
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2021, 05:52:00 PM »
Vertical farming in the heart of Kentucky coal country. 

“We know AppHarvest is the future of farming for Rowan County because we’re all hills and not a lot of flat land.” …
AppHarvest claims to produce up to 30 times the yields of conventional agriculture. …
“AppHarvest isn’t farming. It’s industrial food production.” …


Is This Giant Greenhouse in Kentucky the Future of Farming?
Inside AppHarvest's quest to be the world's biggest ag-tech company, save the Appalachian economy, and ensure the global food supply
August 22, 2021. Jon Cherry for Rolling Stone
Quote
AppHarvest’s glass design uses sunlight and has lower energy costs than typical indoor farms, which rely entirely on lighting in enclosed factories. “The Dutch perfected these things over the years, and AppHarvest has collaborated with Dutch companies for these greenhouses,” Stein says, who himself has bought a couple hundred shares in AppHarvest. “Eventually most tomato greenhouses are profitable, otherwise they wouldn’t be replicated around the world. It’s just going to take a while to recoup the capital costs. They’re not insignificant.”

Webb’s goal is to lower domestic dependence on pesticide-laden foreign imports, which provide 70 percent of U.S. vine crops at the grocery store (tomatoes, berries, cucumbers, peppers). And Webb, a Kentuckian himself, wants to provide jobs to Appalachia. But his motivation goes beyond that, he says, to the same obsessive anxiety many in his generation are facing: the screeching freight train of climate change.

“We want to make it clear our competition is not the American farmer,” Webb says, adding that they began with tomatoes to compete with Mexico’s number-one import that relies on chemical pesticides AppHarvest doesn’t use. “The dirty stuff, that’s our competition, and we will ruthlessly go after them. Our goal is to put them into bankruptcy. The food and agriculture companies of today are the cigarette companies that existed in the 1970s.”

Kentucky is also optimal because the location cuts down on shipping distances, AppHarvest says. Seventy percent of the U.S. is within a day’s drive of Kentucky, reducing transportation emissions by 80 percent.


AppHarvest claims to produce up to 30 times the yields of conventional agriculture. “This 60-acre under-glass facility can do the equivalent of 1,500-2,000 [open-field] acres in California or Mexico.” …

AppHarvest says they’ve also reduced water consumption by 90 percent compared to traditional open-field agriculture by using a closed loop irrigation system that’s 100 percent reliant on rainwater, which makes Kentucky an optimal location — the state has had its wettest decade on record, and in 2020 was the wettest state in the U.S.

The long-term goal is “minimal carbon emissions,” … but until then, she says, the benefits of AppHarvest’s net ecological footprint outweigh the adverse effects of its energy consumption, including its ability to conserve water and avoid agricultural runoff from fertilizers and pesticides.
https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-features/appharvest-hydroponic-greenhouses-kentucky-future-of-farming-1214262/
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Eco-Author

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 201
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 21
  • Likes Given: 116
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2021, 08:23:49 PM »
Just WOW: "AppHarvest claims to produce up to 30 times the yields of conventional agriculture. “This 60-acre under-glass facility can do the equivalent of 1,500-2,000 [open-field] acres in California or Mexico.” …

24/7/365... perfect conditions... Can see this vary quite a bit depending on crop.  Most people even with 'a back yard' don't even garden any more.  Economy of scale of larger buildings with one of these on the roof would also not require Any transport and likely no heat, as the heat rises from the tower below.  No/far less bacteria contamination of crops must be considered too. 

Usually I like to think about these on the rooftop and simply have a clear thick glass flat roof to let in sun light which may not help all the plants in a stacked arrangement, but should help a good bit.  Entire south Side of a 10-story tower would also shorten the distance light has to travel to get to all trays... 

Last I recall there were fiber optic sun light collectors that could channel sunlight anywhere into the home--even with a parabolic collector to gather more, so this is another way to use more sunlight less energy?!  From what I've heard 20 years of talking on this is that some plants don't taste as well if not actual sunlight...

Self-sufficiency and Durability to disasters are the absolute keys to nearly any disaster you can think of such as War, economic collapse, pandemics, Global warming, quakes, volcanoes, Hurricanes... all of which put solar farms etc. and power grids at risk!

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 20409
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 971
  • Likes Given: 335
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #13 on: September 23, 2021, 03:40:54 AM »
Impossible Latest Faux-Meat Maker to Try and Sway Pork Lovers
Quote
Impossible Foods Inc. is launching a new plant-based pork product in the U.S., Singapore and Hong Kong, joining a crowded field trying to replicate the world’s most-consumed meat by targeting consumers in Asia.

Impossible pork will debut at celebrity chef David Chang’s Momofuku Ssäm Bar in New York on Thursday, and restaurants across the U.S. and Hong Kong will be able to order it from food distributors. The product will be available in more than 120 restaurants in Hong Kong in early October, and enter Singaporean eateries the following month, with a focus on those serving regional cuisine, which is traditionally heavy on pork, the company said.

“People who prefer Asian cuisine are absolutely the consumers who are going to migrate to this product,” Impossible President Dennis Woodside told Bloomberg News in an interview.

The rollout comes less than a month after the Redwood City, California-based company started selling faux-chicken nuggets, expanding from its core line of burger patties and sausages. The acceleration of product development at Impossible underscores the fierce competition between food companies as they try to corner the growing market for imitation meat.

Woodside said “whole muscle products” were next. “Think of chicken breast, steak, or pork loin. That muscle is typically denser, chewier, and stringier. That’s a different technical challenge that we’re very focused on solving.”

Still, in its quest to win over Asia, Impossible faces a significant hurdle: a lack of access to consumers in mainland China, where roughly half the pork eaten worldwide is consumed. Global rival Beyond Meat Inc. started selling its faux-pork in China in November, while Chinese startup Zhenmeat started offering it in mid-2020 and Hong Kong’s Green Monday was hawking its OmniPork even before Covid-19. But China’s government hasn’t allowed Impossible to enter the market as the majority of its products use heme -- an ingredient made from genetically-modified yeast -- which requires regulatory approval.

Woodside said there were “no updates” yet on whether its pork would be approved by Chinese authorities, saying Impossible wanted to build a production center in the mainland if it was allowed in.

Faux meat also faces an uphill battle with consumers who still prefer real pork, as plant-based versions generally cost more and versions of popular cuts and dishes -- including pork chops and barbecued pork -- aren’t widely available.

Impossible aims to bring its prices down to closer to that of real meat by scaling up production capacity, Woodside said.

Its U.S. production “has increased by about 14 times in the last 30 months or so,” he said. “As our business grows, we have to constantly be about evaluating new ways of scaling production, whether that’s in the U.S. or overseas.”


Impossible eventually wants to sell packaged pork in grocery stores for cooking at home, he added, and it will be available in ready-to-eat meals in some Hong Kong supermarkets from October.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-09-22/impossible-latest-faux-meat-maker-to-try-and-sway-pork-lovers
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

vox_mundi

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 6383
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3006
  • Likes Given: 521
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #14 on: October 07, 2021, 07:43:51 PM »
Nestle to Trial Plant-Based Eggs and Shrimp
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-10-nestle-trial-plant-based-eggs-shrimp.html

Nestle is offering plant-based alternatives to eggs and shrimp as the Swiss food giant expands its menu in the growing vegan market, the company said Thursday.

The Swiss company has among other things been making a major push in vegetarian and vegan products.

Its latest offerings are the "vEGGie" and "Vrimp".

The egg substitute is made from soy protein and omega-3 fatty acids.

The product "can be scrambled like real eggs, used in a frittata and pancakes or even as an ingredient when baking cakes or cookies," the company said in a statement.

The "Vrimp" is made from mixing seaweed, peas and konjac root, and "has the authentic texture and flavor of succulent shrimps," according to Nestle.

The two products will be offered in a "test-and-learn" launch at a limited number of stores in Switzerland and Germany.

More than 600 companies, from startups to the biggest food companies, are developing such alternative foods, Credit Suisse said.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― anonymous

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

morganism

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 452
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 97
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2021, 08:40:05 PM »
Canada's prehistoric shoreline fish traps and mussle gardens

"The abundance of even long-abandoned gardens found on British Columbia's coast is staggering. Research shows that the terraced gardens, which Indigenous people have been building for at least 3,500 years, are 150 to 300% more productive than wild beaches in producing littleneck and butter clams, as well as other marine organisms."

"In our tradition when you are learning something, you start with the oldest way possible," said Norris. So on the first gathering at a clam garden just off of Salt Spring Island, she told everyone to put their science away, asked for guidance from the ancestors and started at the beginning: "This is how far you put your rake in. This is how wind or salinity or time of year affects the clams."

The moment Indigenous people returned to their sea gardens and fish traps was the moment the technology stopped being about the past and became about the future."

https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20211013-an-underwater-mystery-on-canadas-coast

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 20409
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 971
  • Likes Given: 335
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #16 on: October 20, 2021, 08:18:36 PM »
Alternatives to MREs in disasters, and new methods of food production for resource-scarce regions.

NASA Announces Winners of Deep Space Food Challenge
Quote
NASA, in coordination with CSA, opened the Deep Space Food Challenge in January. The competition asked innovators to design food production technologies or systems that met specific requirements: They would need to use minimal resources and produce minimal waste. The meals they produced would have to be safe, nutritious, and delicious for long-duration human exploration missions.

For the U.S. teams, NASA’s judges grouped submissions based on the food they envisioned producing. Among the designs were systems that used ingredients to create ready-to-eat foods such as bread, as well as dehydrated powders that could be processed into more complex food products. Others involved cultivated plants and fungi or engineered or cultured food such as cultured meat cells.

“These types of food systems could offer benefits on our home planet,” said Robyn Gatens, director of the International Space Station Program at NASA and challenge judge. “Solutions from this challenge could enable new avenues for worldwide food production in resource-scarce regions and locations where disasters disrupt critical infrastructure.”

NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website will air a show on the Deep Space Food Challenge at 11 a.m. EST Nov. 9 with details about the competition, winning solutions, and what could be next for the teams.

Special guests during the show will include celebrity chef Martha Stewart and retired NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, who will announce the winners of two awards honoring international teams that demonstrated exceptional innovation. Other participants will include retired CSA astronaut Chris Hadfield and celebrity chef Lynn Crawford. …
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-announces-winners-of-deep-space-food-challenge

Details about the winning submissions and teams can be found on the challenge website:
https://www.deepspacefoodchallenge.org
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

ivica

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1166
  • Kelele
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 78
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #17 on: October 28, 2021, 01:14:15 PM »
#0 ... "Our results indeed suggest... "

Wondering to what conclusionsuggestion researchers who eat more vegies might come  ;)

https://twitter.com/landgeist/status/1448990036548984851   Vegetable consumption in #Europe - by Landgeist Maps @landgeist



https://twitter.com/landgeist/status/1452991654584012810   Vegetable consumption in Asia.

<

kassy

  • Moderator
  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4061
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 1612
  • Likes Given: 1589
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #18 on: October 28, 2021, 06:04:31 PM »
Merged insect farming into this general thread.

It could be a cheap and efficient way of protein which is better then soy from what formerly was a rainforest.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Tor Bejnar

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4283
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 829
  • Likes Given: 693
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #19 on: October 28, 2021, 09:15:37 PM »
Around 1968 my dad and I were walking across a field of young plants (30 or 40 cm tall) in North Texas with the farmer.  He asked my day if he knew what he was growing and my dad didn't.  I remember the farmer saying, "It's called soybeans. It's a new plant; it's no good for eating but makes great cattle forage."

First you claim the idea is actually new (when it isn't, just new to 'you').
Then you claim it's only good for animals (when it isn't, just strange and different to 'you').
Finally it becomes a mainstay of the diet.

Soybeans then, insects today.  Progress!
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things because "we cannot negotiate with the melting point of ice"

ivica

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1166
  • Kelele
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 78
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #20 on: October 29, 2021, 03:41:23 AM »
Had some thoughts similar to Tor's yesterday,

an european meat eater visiting buffet in one of China's poorest provinces: Is this heaven on Earth?

there is alot of food new to me and feeling a bit jealous not being able to try some as my alternate one ;)

<

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 20409
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 971
  • Likes Given: 335
Re: New or Alternate Foods & Agricultural Methods
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2021, 10:56:26 PM »
NASA Spinoff
NASA built the first "vertical farm" in the United States to test methods for keeping astronauts fed and healthy during long-duration space missions. Now that same NASA Technology is putting vegetables on your dining room table.
 
NASA Research Launches a New Generation of Indoor Farming
Quote
… One way Plenty Unlimited maintains plant health is by using robotics in nearly every step of the farming process. Proprietary technology grows the company’s Spicy Mizuna Mix… and relies on data to optimize growing conditions. The growing environment mimics the closed-loop environment developed by NASA in the Biomass Production Chamber that demonstrated how to grow plants without sunlight or open air.

Plenty uses less than 1% of the water of traditional farming, and the company's two-acre farm produces similar yields to a 720-acre outdoor farm.

Currently a global market worth $2.9 billion, some estimates project the vertical farming market could reach $7.3 billion by 2025.

“The entire industry is built on NASA research,” said Storey. Since its early days, NASA has explored bioregenerative life-support systems, with plants recycling waste, producing food and oxygen, and eliminating carbon dioxide.

From that work, Plenty adopted a type of “nutrient film technique” that the agency pioneered. This soil-free hydroponic system circulates a constant, minimal film of water around seedlings, containing all the necessary nutrients.

The approach produces fresher, healthier, more flavorful plants. Uniformity of lighting along with data-driven controls over all other variables tied to a plant community makes growth rates and output predictable, according to Storey. Harvesting young plants while they’re more tender and flavorful means the produce tastes better than plants that are allowed to fully mature. And because the time from farm to table is dramatically shorter, the plants retain the freshness and nutritive value typically lost during long-haul transportation.

By controlling every element of the environment, Plenty can avoid using harmful chemicals like pesticides and herbicides that also impact plant health.

Bowery’s system uses artificial intelligence to make sense of crop data and manage growth cycles. Just as a person can learn to identify tip burn on a leaf of butter lettuce, computers can be taught the same kind of recognition. Using thousands of photographs, computers learn to identify problems and automatically adjust parts of the system, said Sztul.

Vertical farms aren’t the only CEA businesses benefiting from NASA research. Potato farmers now use nutrient film technique in greenhouses. The agency first pioneered this method for root zone crops like potatoes, sweet potatoes, and peanuts, said Wheeler, and it’s proven itself with record-breaking potato yields.

CSS Farms uses this technique to grow seed potatoes called minitubers in greenhouses. Unlike plants grown from seed, potatoes are grown from either cut potatoes or minitubers. These can be shipped and planted in fields, where they grow into plants that produce large potatoes for consumption.

Soil-growing methods typically yield five or six minitubers per plant. “We’ll harvest two or three times a week for a 12-week harvest period in three crops per year. In a nutrient film system, you can get 30 to 50 minitubers per plant,” said Matt Barrow, greenhouse manager with CSS Farms.

As NASA continues to advance life-support systems in preparation for missions to the Moon and Mars, these will support the further growth of the CEA industry. …
https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/spinoff/NASA_Research_Launches_a_New_Generation_of_Indoor_Farming
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.