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Author Topic: Arctic evolution  (Read 1913 times)

Espen

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Arctic evolution
« on: March 18, 2021, 12:26:44 PM »
How about this one?
Have a ice day!

The Walrus

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2021, 01:41:54 PM »
There is no way it can fly.  Due to the haphazard way its wings flap and Its wings being too small to get its fat body off the ground.  Oh wait, that is the bumblebee.

Freegrass

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2021, 05:41:19 PM »
Small wings isn't the biggest problem. What muscles is he going to use to flap them? And that's why angels can't be real either... It has always bothered me. Glad I got that out of my system...  ;D ;D ;D
When factual science is in conflict with our beliefs or traditions, we cuddle up in our own delusional fantasy where everything starts making sense again...

Freegrass

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2021, 05:47:19 PM »
Something I've always wondered about is why evolution hasn't given us real flying fish. Why has no fish taken to the sky yet?
When factual science is in conflict with our beliefs or traditions, we cuddle up in our own delusional fantasy where everything starts making sense again...

The Walrus

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2021, 06:28:33 PM »
Something I've always wondered about is why evolution hasn't given us real flying fish. Why has no fish taken to the sky yet?

Maybe it is not the wing issue.  Perhaps it is the whole breathing oxygen with lungs rather than sequestering it through gills.

The Walrus

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2021, 06:29:47 PM »
Small wings isn't the biggest problem. What muscles is he going to use to flap them? And that's why angels can't be real either... It has always bothered me. Glad I got that out of my system... 

Angels only have wings in our artistic impressions of them.  Ancient writings never describe them with wings.

gerontocrat

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2021, 06:44:42 PM »
Something I've always wondered about is why evolution hasn't given us real flying fish. Why has no fish taken to the sky yet?
That would require two ways of getting O2 into the body. i.e. one while in water, the other when flying.

Perhaps that's why hybrid cars are crap.
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Freegrass

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2021, 07:04:19 PM »
Something I've always wondered about is why evolution hasn't given us real flying fish. Why has no fish taken to the sky yet?
That would require two ways of getting O2 into the body. i.e. one while in water, the other when flying.

Perhaps that's why hybrid cars are crap.
LOL...

That would have been the same for fish that started to come on land. They would have also had to have two ways of getting O2 into their body...

I think it has more to do with food. Fish fly to escape predators. But they came on land to feed. So my guess is that there were never enough insects above the water to feed on that they felt a need to fly.

A fish is the only animal that never developed flight, right? We have (had) flying mammals, reptiles, insects, but no fish...
« Last Edit: March 18, 2021, 07:13:22 PM by Freegrass »
When factual science is in conflict with our beliefs or traditions, we cuddle up in our own delusional fantasy where everything starts making sense again...

oren

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2021, 07:29:57 PM »
Swimming in air and swimming in water require very different densities.

Freegrass

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2021, 08:07:19 PM »
Awesome David Attenborough fragment about flying fish. They can go pretty far, but then birds will eat them...  :'(
The second video speculates about Flish in 200 million years from now...



https://youtu.be/c8Ady7ySayI?t=489
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HapHazard

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2021, 03:27:00 AM »

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2021, 10:55:48 PM »
...
A fish is the only animal that never developed flight, right? We have (had) flying mammals, reptiles, insects, but no fish...
No amphibian has ever flown on their own accord, I expect.  (I'm reminded of raining frogs.)
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Freegrass

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2021, 11:26:35 PM »
...
A fish is the only animal that never developed flight, right? We have (had) flying mammals, reptiles, insects, but no fish...
No amphibian has ever flown on their own accord, I expect.  (I'm reminded of raining frogs.)
True... But they already live in the water, and on land. So to have an animal that could swim, walk, and fly, that would truly be amazing...

Oh wait... Flying frogs you say?


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gerontocrat

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Re: Arctic evolution
« Reply #13 on: March 29, 2021, 11:10:11 AM »
It is even colder than the Arctic in space

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2021/mar/18/new-bacteria-lurking-on-iss-no-space-oddity-says-scientist
New bacteria lurking on ISS no space oddity, says scientist

New species were discovered in the International Space Station – but they probably didn’t come from outer space


The International Space Station is constantly resupplied with potentially non-sterile cargo. Photograph: Nasa/AFP/Getty Images
Quote
Four species of bacteria – three of them previously unknown to science – have been discovered onboard the International Space Station (ISS), begging questions about how they got there, and how they have managed to survive.

Their discovery may also bolster future efforts to cultivate crops during long spaceflight missions, since related species are known to promote the growth of plants and help them fight off pathogens.

Previous studies had suggested that certain resilient strains of bacteria could survive the harsh conditions of space, including dried pellets of Deinococcus bacteria – listed in the Guinness World Records as the world’s toughest – which survived on the space station’s surface for three years. They were deliberately placed there to test the “panspermia” theory, that life exists throughout the universe and may be transported between planets by space dust, asteroids, comets, or even contaminated spacecraft.

Another recent study identified a diverse population of bacteria and fungi associated with the human body inside the ISS, where they are somewhat more protected – though still subject to low gravity, recirculated air and high levels of carbon dioxide.

The new bacteria were similarly identified from swabs of various locations inside the ISS. One was discovered on a dining table; another on an overhead panel in a research area used to study low gravity; the third in the Cupola observatory. The fourth species, which was already known of, was found on an old air-purifying filter, which had been returned to Earth. All of them are rod-shaped bacteria belonging to the Methylobacteriaceae family – usually found in soil and fresh water, where they help to promote plant growth and defend against pathogens.

They’re most likely to have been transferred to the ISS from Earth – rather than coming from outer space – and have either survived since the station’s inception, or were introduced when new astronauts or payloads arrived.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)