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bluesky

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boycott of neonicotinoids producers (Bayer and others)
« on: May 02, 2021, 10:40:42 PM »
Opening a new topic on the most efficient way for a worldwide consumer boycott of Bayer product up to the time Bayer completely withdraw the neonicotinoids pesticides as this pharma chemical group (along with Cheminova, Syngenta, BASF, FMC Corp, Adama Agricultural Solution, Monsanto, DOW Agroscience, Nufarm, DuPont....) still widely commercialise neonicotinoids around the world with dire consequences as all ASIF members should certainly be aware:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henk_Tennekes_%28toxicologist%29
https://www.farmlandbirds.net/node/6186
https://www.pnas.org/content/117/37/22609#:~:text=Neonicotinoids%20are%20used%20to%20manage,to%20pass%20to%20nontarget%20species



Today everything related to both climate change and biodiversity is political as human kind destiny is highly dependent on both. I have always found the science side of climate change and loss of biodiversity fascinating, but if we do not act globally we will  not even get the luxury  to discuss any of these fascinating subjects behind our screens and about their cause and unwinding process, in a thirty, fifty or one hundred year time following a succession of crisis generated by run-away climate change and the 6th extinction.
Government and politicians continue with their green washing policy while ppm level of CO2 in the air keeps rising steadily  and continuous loss of biodiversity seem unstoppable.

The topic would be to discuss

•   how to raise maximum awareness to the wider public of Bayer’s neonicotinoid/neonics consequences (along with other pesticides produced by other equivalent pharma chemical conglomerate)
•   building tools to act (e.g. mobile phone apps allowing to recognise Bayer products through scanning the bar code...)
•   campaign networking through social media and other platforms
•   campaign ‘on the ground”
•   how not to disperse effort, but to be efficient and focused (there are multiple websites with lists of Bayer products to boycott, but with very little impact for the moment)
•   May be targeting a selected handful of products to boycott (those with the highest margins) would be more efficient, for that we would need insiders with knowledge of the most profitable products
•   how to involve the intermediate prescribers (doctors, veterinary,  pharmacists,
farmers...) into the world boycott movement,
•   other related subjects useful to a successful boycott campaign
 
Only consumer movement will be able to stop the sale of terribly destructive products for the biodiversity, as policymakers have failed to do so and will continue to fail.
In France a new “temporary” authorisation to use some neonicotinoids for beetroots farming (circa 450 000 hectares, a billions euros agro industry), was granted in December 2020 for 3 years, after they were banned 2 years ago… there have been partial interdictions in some European countries (not for all neonics) while neonics are still widely used in most parts of the world. Recent scientific studies show that neonics pollution / ecocide can be long lasting post interdiction.

"despite the evidence of negative effects on ecosystems as far as sediments (Bonmatin et al. 2019), and little productivity gains in food production, worldwide use of neonicotinoids and other insecticides continues to grow unabated with only a few exceptions as exemplified above."
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11356-021-12853-6

https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/neonicotinoid-insecticides-market.html

This also could be applied to areas at the cross road of climate change and biodiversity, e.g. companies, including supply chains and logistics, involved into Amazonian forest depletion....

There is an incredible number of highly knowledgeable members on ASIF, that are able to devise excellent ideas to answer to this challenge.

I know people will say, this is highly challenging, difficult and complicated, to implement a globally efficient consumer boycott movement, but it is likely our only chance to succeed despite the hurdles. What would be needed, is an excellent strategic plan, and collaborative networking efforts through platforms and social media.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2021, 10:19:45 AM by bluesky »

bluesky

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Re: boycott of neonicotinoids producers (Bayer and others)
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2021, 10:27:51 AM »
excellent Deutsche Welle documentary on neonicotinoids, science research and facts, ecocide  impact of neonicotinoids  on ecosystem, criminal behaviour of Bayer who knew the harmful impact of neonicotinoids from the start, and how the company intimidates and threatens independent scientists working on neonicotinoids, finally how  the authorisation of pesticides and insecticides at European level is rigged by entryism from Bayer and other agro pharma chemical conglomerates . Other main manufacturer of neonicotinoids : Cheminova, Syngenta, BASF, FMC Corp, Adama Agricultural Solution, Monsanto, DOW Agroscience, Nufarm, DuPont.


bluesky

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Re: boycott of neonicotinoids producers (Bayer and others)
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2021, 02:53:03 PM »
Residues of neonicotinoids in soil, water and people's hair: A case study from three agricultural regions of the Philippines
Jean-MarcBonmati et al , Science of The Total Environment, Feb 2021


https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969720373538

Abstract
"Synthetic pesticides such as neonicotinoids are commonly used to treat crops in tropical regions, where data on environmental and human contamination are patchy and make it difficult to assess to what extent pesticides may harm human health, especially in less developed countries.

To assess the degree of environmental and human contamination with neonicotinoids we collected soil, water and people's hair in three agricultural regions of the Philippines and analysed them by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS-MS). Five neonicotinoids, namely acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam were targeted.

Residues of neonicotinoids were found in 78% of 67 soil samples from the three provinces. Total neonicotinoid loads ranged on average between 0.017 and 0.89 μg/kg in soils of rice, banana and vegetable crops, and were 130 times higher (113.5 μg/kg) in soils of a citrus grove. Imidacloprid was the most prevalent compound at an average of 0.56 μg/kg in soil while thiacloprid was below the limit of detection. Half of the eight water samples from a rice field and nearby creek contained residues of imidacloprid (mean 1.29 ng/L) and one contained thiamethoxam (0.15 ng/L). Residues of neonicotinoids were found in 81% of 99 samples of people's hair from the surveyed regions (average total concentrations 0.14 to 1.18 ng/g, maximum 350 ng/g). Hair residue levels correlated well with the concentrations of thiamethoxam and total residues in soils from the same locality (r = 0.98). The presence of thiacloprid in 15% of the hair samples but not in soil samples suggests an additional route of exposure among people, which is most likely to be through ingestion of agricultural food and drinks available in the market."


bluesky

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Re: boycott of neonicotinoids producers (Bayer and others)
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2021, 03:00:07 PM »
Prevalence of neonicotinoids and sulfoxaflor in alluvial aquifers in a high corn and soybean producing region of the Midwestern United States
Darrin A.Thompson August 2021, Science of the Total Environment

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969721018301


Abstract
"Neonicotinoids have been previously detected in Iowa surface waters, but less is known regarding their occurrence in groundwater. To help fill this research gap, a groundwater study was conducted in eastern Iowa and southeastern Minnesota, a corn and soybean producing area with known heavy neonicotinoid use. Neonicotinoids were studied in alluvial aquifers, a hydrogeologic setting known to be vulnerable to surface-applied contaminants. Groundwater samples were analyzed from 40 wells for six neonicotinoid compounds (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, thiacloprid, thiamethoxam), and sulfoxaflor. Samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with both direct aqueous injection and solid phase extraction methods. Neonicotinoids were prevalent in the alluvial aquifers with 73% of the wells having at least one neonicotinoid detection. Clothianidin (68%, max: 391.7 ng/L) was the most commonly detected, followed by imidacloprid (43%, max: 6.7 ng/L) and thiamethoxam (3%, max: 0.2 ng/L). Acetamiprid, dinotefuran, sulfoxaflor, and thiacloprid were not detected during the study. The solid phase extraction method was more sensitive than direct aqueous injection, where only clothianidin detected in 23% of samples. SPE is the preferred method for detecting low concentrations of hydrophilic pesticides in water. This study documented that the combination of heavy chemical use overlying a hydrogeologic setting vulnerable to surface applied contaminants leads to transport of neonicotinoids into an important groundwater resource."


bluesky

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Re: boycott of neonicotinoids producers (Bayer and others)
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2021, 03:17:31 PM »
Cumulative exposure assessment of neonicotinoids and an investigation into their intake-related factors in young children in Japan
Naoko Oyaa et al, Jan 2021, Science of the Total Environment

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S004565352033616X

Abstract
"Exposure levels of neonicotinoids (NEO) in young children remain unknown, despite their widespread use and the plausible vulnerability of toddlers to environmental toxicants. Herein we aimed to clarify the exposure levels and sources of NEOs in young Japanese children. Disposable diapers were collected from 1036 children (16–23 months old) participating in an adjunct study of the Japan Environment and Children's Study between 2015 and 2016. Six NEOs and one metabolite in urine extracted from a diaper from each child were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A relative potency factor approach was used to assess the cumulative exposure to NEOs equivalent to dinotefuran levels (DINRPF). The 95th percentile urinary concentration of DINRPF was 157 μg/L and 380 μg/g creatinine (Cr). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses for the propensity scores of the possible exposure-related factors revealed that the discriminatory powers determining whether Cr-adjusted and Cr-unadjusted DINRPF concentrations exceeding the 95th percentile values were higher for the amount of each foodstuff ingested on the survey day (areas under the curve were 0.62 and 0.75, respectively) than for the exposure-related behaviors (0.60 and 0.71, respectively) or for mothers' attitudes toward food selection and preparation (0.54 and 0.57, respectively). Use of a mosquito coil, insect repellent, and mothproof net for a screen door, and playing on a lawn were associated with increased urinary NEO levels (odds ratio [OR]: 2.0–2.9), while care about the child's nutritional balance by mothers reduced urinary NEO levels (OR: 0.23–0.41). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that dealt with urinary concentrations and possible exposure sources of NEOs in a large number of young children. Attention to the children's behavior and diet might result in the reduction of a high exposure to NEOs in young children."


bluesky

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Re: boycott of neonicotinoids producers (Bayer and others)
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2021, 03:23:45 PM »
Human Exposures to Neonicotinoids in Kumasi, Ghana
Collins Nimako April 2021 Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

https://setac.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/etc.5065

Abstract
Neonicotinoid insecticides (NNIs) are now popular in many agricultural systems across Africa; however, the extent of human exposures to NNIs in African countries are scarcely reported. The present study sought to evaluate neonicotinoid exposures in the consumer population of Kumasi, a cosmopolitan city in Ghana. A total of 75 human urine samples were collected from healthy volunteers (non‐farmers; age 13‐80 years old); and analyzed with LC‐ESI/MS/MS system. Seven NNIs and three NNI metabolites were detected in the following pattern (frequency, median concentration, maximum concentration): N‐dm‐acetamiprid (94.7%, 0.41 µg/L, 8.79 µg/L) > imidacloprid (70.7%, 0.15 µg/L, 211.62 µg/L) > CPMF (62.2%, 0.43 µg/L, 53.85 µg/L) > CPMA (56.8%, 0.10 µg/L, 3.53 µg/L) > clothianidin (40%, >LOQ, 0.45 µg/L) > nitenpyram (18.7%, >LOQ, 0.14 µg/L) ≈ thiamethoxam (18.7%, >LOQ, 0.21 µg/L) > dinotefuran (12.0%, >LOQ, 1.01 µg/L) > acetamiprid (2.7%, >LOQ, 0.08 µg/L) ≈ thiacloprid (2.7%, >LOQ, 0.14 µg/L). About 92% of the subjects were found to be exposed to multiple neonicotinoids simultaneously. The mean, median and maximum IMIeq (imidacloprid equivalence of the relative potency factor of NNIs) were found to be 1.6, 0.5, 22.52 respectively. The median estimated daily intakes of acetamiprid, imidacloprid and nitenpyram were 0.47, 1.27 and 0.02 µg/kg/day for females: and 0.91, 0.66 and 0.08 µg/kg/day for males, respectively. The maximum daily intakes (DI) of all the NNIs were below 1% of their chronic reference doses (cRfDs), except for imidacloprid and thiacloprid which recorded a maximum DIs corresponding to 17.97% and 8.28% of cRfDs respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first biomonitoring report on neonicotinoid insecticides in Africa.

bluesky

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Re: boycott of neonicotinoids producers (Bayer and others)
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2021, 03:29:41 PM »
Neonicotinoids, fipronil, chlorpyrifos, carbendazim, chlorotriazines, chlorophenoxy herbicides, bentazon, and selected pesticide transformation products in surface water and drinking water from northern Vietnam
YanjianWan et al, Jan 2021,  Science of The Total Environment

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969720350361

Highlights
•Lake water had lower herbicide levels and higher insecticide levels than river water.

•Degradation product of acetamiprid was found in lake water.

•Fipronil in lake water exceeded the threshold value set in the USA or the Netherlands.

•Terbuthylazine level in a lake exceeded the predicted no effect concentration (PNEC).

•Chlorpyrifos and carbendazim concentrations in lake water exceeded the PNECs.

Abstract
"Studies on the occurrence of emerging pesticides in surface and drinking water in Vietnam are limited. In this study, lake water (n = 7), river water (n = 1), tap water (n = 46), and bottled water (n = 3) collected from Hanoi and other four provinces in northern Vietnam were analyzed for selected pesticides (including insecticides such as neonicotinoids, fipronil, and chlorpyrifos; fungicide carbendazim; herbicides such as atrazine, terbuthylazine, simazine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, and bentazon) and some of their degradates by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Carbendazim (median: 86.7 ng/L) and triazines (49.3 ng/L) were the major pesticides found in lake water samples, followed by neonicotinoids and their degradation products (15.1 ng/L), chlorpyrifos and its degradate (13.4 ng/L), fipronil and its degradates (3.76 ng/L), chlorophenoxy acid herbicides (2.10 ng/L), and bentazon (0.62 ng/L). Triazines (164 ng/L) were the major pesticides in river water. Higher concentrations (median: 39.3 ng/L; range: 1.20–127) of selected pesticides were found in tap water from Hanoi than those from four other provinces studied (5.49 ng/L; 4.73–66.8 ng/L). Bottled water samples collected from Hanoi contained lower concentrations of pesticide residues (median: 3.54 ng/L, range: 2.18–8.09) than those of tap water samples. The calculated risks from pesticide exposure through ingestion of tap water by the general populations were low. However, fipronil concentrations in lake water exceeded the benchmark value recommended for freshwater in the United States or the Netherlands. Degradation of acetamiprid into desmethyl-acetamiprid was found in lake water."


bluesky

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Re: boycott of neonicotinoids producers (Bayer and others)
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2021, 03:43:07 PM »
Multiple Neonicotinoids in Children's Cerebro-Spinal Fluid, Plasma, and Urine
16 Pages Posted: 14 Apr 2021
Bernard Laubscher et al. The Lancet (preprint)

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3826201

Abstract
Background: Neonicotinoids (NN) are selectively neurotoxic pesticides that bind to insect but also mammals nicotinic acetycholine receptors (nAChRs). As the most widely used class of insecticides worldwide, they are ubiquitously found in the environment, wildlife, and foods and thus of special concern for their impacts on the environment and human health. nAChRs are vital to proper brain organization during the prenatal period and play important roles in various motor, emotional, and cognitive functions. Little is known on children’s contamination by NN. In a pilot study we tested the hypothesis that children's cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can be contaminated by NN.

Methods: NN were analysed in leftover CSF, blood, and urine samples from children treated for leukaemias and lymphomas and undergoing therapeutic lumbar punctions. We monitored all neonicotinoids approved on the global market and some of their most common metabolites by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

Findings: From August to December 2020, 14 children were consecutively included. Median age was 8 years (range 3-18). All CSF and plasma samples were positive for at least one NN. Nine (64%) CSF samples and 13 (93%) plasma samples contained more than one NN. Thirteen (93%) CSF samples had desmethyl-acetamiprid (median 0·0123, range 0·0024-0·1068 ng/mL). All but one urine samples were positive for ≥ one NN.

Interpretation: Multiple NN and/or their metabolites are present in children's CSF, plasma, and urine. Our data suggest that contamination by multiple NN is not only an environmental hazard for non-target insects such as bees but also potentially for children.

bluesky

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Re: boycott of neonicotinoids producers (Bayer and others)
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2021, 03:53:17 PM »
Insecticide harmful to bees temporarily allowed in France
Neonicotinoids have been approved for three years to be used in growing sugar beet despite having previously been banned, mainly due to evidence that they are toxic for bees.
French MPs have voted through a law allowing temporary use of a controversial insecticide in a bid to help the struggling sugar beet industry.

The bill was approved by the Assemblée Nationale yesterday (October 6), despite opposition from environmentalists. There were 313 votes in favour, 158 against, and 56 abstentions.

The vote follows a campaign from French beet farmers, who want to use the insecticides to protect their crops. They say the ban has left their crops vulnerable to jaundice caused by aphids, and some had lost half of this year's crop.

They say there is a danger to the future of the French sugar sector, which employs some 46,000 people in France.

Other methods available, more support needed for farmers
Neonicotinoids are particularly effective in fighting against the problem and the MPs based their decision on an EU rule that an unauthorised substance may be used under certain conditions where there is a danger to production of a crop and the problem cannot be resolved by other 'reasonable means'.

The authorisation is not for spraying of the substances but only for the planting of seeds treated with them, a method that was very widely used until the neonicotinoid ban in France in 2018. The law also comes with other safeguards
such as creating a special council to oversee the use of the substances and a ban on planting anything likely to attract bees near to the treated sugar beet fields.

However a researcher from national scientific research centre CNRS, Jean-Marc Bonmatin, told news source FranceInfo that the insecticide is not necessary.

Dr Bonmatin said: “There are many alternative methods for cultivating beets.

“Cultivating sugar beets is not dependent on neonicotinoids. Sugar beets are an ancient, traditional crop.”

The problem for French growers, in his eyes, is external market pressure.

He said: “Beet growers today face unbridled competition, from eastern Europe and Latin America. They are steered towards producing the cheapest product possible, and neonicotinoids allow for this kind of intensive farming.

“I think it would be more worthwhile to help farmers overcome this difficulty,
rather than reintroducing neonicotinoids." The ban had been based on 20 years of research, he said.

The researcher claimed that jaundice presented a threat to only around 10-15% of French sugar beet crops, in which he said production has grown by “two or three times” in the past 30 years.

Risks to biodiversity
While neonicotinoids are effective in getting rid of aphids, they have been found to have a detrimental effect on biodiversity and to be especially harmful to bee populations, Dr Bonmatin said.

However he added that the pesticides are difficult to avoid today because they have been so widely used around the world, and traces of them can remain in crops years after they are last used.

https://www.connexionfrance.com/French-news/French-law-approves-insecticide-deadly-for-bees