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Sigmetnow

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Andes Glaciers
« on: May 06, 2018, 12:44:49 AM »
In 1941, Lake Palcacocha spewed a glacial lake outburst flood that destroyed the city of Huaraz, Peru.  Today, fueled by tourism, Huaraz has grown into the second largest city in the central Peruvian Andes—its population has quadrupled.  And the volume of the lake is now 34 times greater than it was in 1941 — a ticking time bomb of 4.5 billion gallons of water.

Beneath a Melting Glacier, a Peruvian Town Prepares For the Worst
https://earther.com/beneath-a-melting-glacier-a-peruvian-town-prepares-for-1825713749
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Martin Gisser

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2018, 03:37:20 AM »
Well, heck, somehow human overpopulation has to be killed off. Better flood than war, pestilence, or starvation. When will they ever learn? When will they ever learn...

magnamentis

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2018, 08:49:35 PM »
Well, heck, somehow human overpopulation has to be killed off. Better flood than war, pestilence, or starvation. When will they ever learn? When will they ever learn...

good question, the answer is never before extinction. how comes i see it that way, because of history while extinction in the past was local, tribes, kingdoms etc. and now that we're globalised it will perhaps be global but at least more widely spread so to say ;)

however, thinking about things like that i know exactly why i'm a huge fan of science fiction or space exploration, it's the only chance we have, latest once the red giant will swallow us in about 4 billion years LOL

Susan Anderson

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2018, 08:35:57 PM »
Well, heck, somehow human overpopulation has to be killed off. Better flood than war, pestilence, or starvation. When will they ever learn? When will they ever learn...

good question, the answer is never before extinction. how comes i see it that way, because of history while extinction in the past was local, tribes, kingdoms etc. and now that we're globalised it will perhaps be global but at least more widely spread so to say ;)

however, thinking about things like that i know exactly why i'm a huge fan of science fiction or space exploration, it's the only chance we have, latest once the red giant will swallow us in about 4 billion years LOL

Trouble is the environmental and financial cost of going to Mars (or anywhere else) is astronomical and impractical, while the cost of fixing things here is only unaffordable because a staggering fraction of earth's apex predators haven't learned how to think reflect, and act as a community for mutual benefit.

ReverendMilkbone

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2018, 07:41:42 PM »

kassy

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2019, 10:55:47 AM »
South America’s Glaciers May Have a Bigger Problem Than Climate Change

Casassa is standing at the foot of a glacier, 4,200 meters (13,800 feet) above sea level. The sky over the Andes is a deep blue, but something is not right: It’s July—mid-winter in South America—and yet it’s mild for the time of year, above 0 degrees Centigrade. He takes off his orange ski jacket and walks on the bare rock.

“This should all be covered by snow this time of year,” he says, pointing to Olivares Alfa, one of the largest glaciers in central Chile, just a few meters away. “There used to be one single glacier system covering this whole valley; now it’s pulled back so much that it’s divided into four or five smaller glaciers.”

Chile has one of the world’s largest reserves of fresh water outside the north and south poles, but the abundant glaciers that are the source of that precious commodity are melting fast. That’s not just an ecological disaster in the making, it’s rapidly becoming an economic and political dilemma for the government of Latin America’s richest nation.

 
A toxic cocktail of rising temperatures, the driest nine-year period on record and human activity, including mining, is proving lethal for the ice of Chile’s central region. Built up over thousands of years, the ice mass is now retreating one meter per year on average.

...

An academic paper from 2010 found that a third of all rock glaciers in central Chile had been directly impacted by mining activities such as road building, drilling platforms and depositing waste on top of the ice. In addition, dust from trucks and explosions in pits as well as vibrations from heavy machinery accelerate the melting. Mining itself is water intensive since it’s needed in each step to produce copper, with usage forecast to rise.


https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/south-america-s-glaciers-may-have-a-bigger-problem-than-climate-change-1.1301277
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philopek

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2020, 06:53:04 PM »
A few nice pics of the "Perito Moreno" Glacier in Argentina from yesterday.

It's perhaps worth to mention that this is one of the very few if not the only Glacier that
didn't lose any of it's mass for the last 100 years.

I hope that I found the best possible thread:

philopek

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2020, 06:54:23 PM »
4 more

philopek

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2020, 06:55:49 PM »
3 more

blumenkraft

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2020, 06:56:20 PM »
Impressive <3

philopek

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2020, 06:56:55 PM »
Maps

be cause

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2020, 06:42:19 PM »
brighter than a virus anyway :) .. b.c.
2007 + 5 = 2012 + 4 = 2016 + 3 = 2019 + 2 = 2021 + 1 .. you gotta laugh .. :)

kassy

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2021, 01:45:06 PM »
Bolivia’s Tuni glacier is disappearing, and so is the water it supplies

LA PAZ (Reuters) -Bolivia’s Tuni glacier is disappearing faster than initially anticipated, according to scientists in the Andean nation, a predicament that will likely make worse water shortages already plaguing the capital La Paz, just 60 km away.

Scientists from the Universidad Mayor de San Andrés (UMSA), who monitor the Tuni and other regional glaciers, told Reuters the once sprawling glacier had been reduced to just one square kilometer.

Where once they had predicted it would last to 2025, now they say its disappearance is imminent.

https://www.metro.us/bolivias-tuni-glacier-is/
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kassy

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #13 on: August 06, 2021, 11:37:17 AM »
‘Mega-drought’ leaves many Andes mountains without snow cover

The Andes mountain range is facing historically low snowfall this year during a decade-long drought that scientists link to global heating.

Scant rain and snowfall are leaving many of the majestic mountains between Ecuador and Argentina with patchy snow cover or no snow at all as dry, brown earth lies exposed.

As precipitation declines and glaciers retreat across the region, communities who depend on the mountains for water supply are likely to suffer shortages, said Ricardo Villalba, principal investigator for the Argentine Institute of Snow, Glacier and Environment Science Studies.

“Here we are seeing a process of long-term decrease in precipitation, a mega-drought,” he said. “If you look at the precipitation levels right now for the entire Cordillera [Andes range], they show that it has either not snowed at all or has snowed very little.”

The southern hemisphere is experiencing winter, when snowfall should peak.

...

The Andes’ glaciers, which between 2000-2010 remained the same size or even grew, were now receding, Villalba said, adding: “The glaciers are in a very dramatic process of retreat that is much more accelerated than we have seen before.

“This is unfortunately happening in all the glaciers of the Cordillera, and is strongly linked to the global warming process that is affecting the entire planet.”

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/aug/06/mega-drought-leaves-many-andes-mountains-without-snow-cover

Sat pictures on the link.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #14 on: October 08, 2021, 10:05:39 PM »
cross post
GeoLog's Imaggeo On Monday ... September 20, 202
Quote
Chacaltaya ski hut, Bolivian Andes, 5400 m above sea level. The world’s former highest ski resort where the Chacaltaya glacier once stood, situated in the Cordillera Real, close to La Paz.  Chacaltaya [the glacier] vanished in 2009, six years earlier than scientists had predicted. ...


From SnowBrains
Quote
Chacaltaya ski resort was created to allow good winter snow skiing from November to March every year.  The lift was only open on weekends due to the extreme cold of the area.  Summer glacier skiing on the 18,000-year-old Chacaltaya glacier was possible before the glacier completely melted away in 2009 ....  Big, snowy winters are the only thing that can get the Chacaltaya ski lift spinning nowadays.

2nd closest ski resort to Earth’s equator at 16° Latitude (closest is in Indonesia… [indoors, too])
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things because "we cannot negotiate with the melting point of ice"

kassy

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2021, 07:00:31 PM »
Tourists were left flabbergasted as they saw a sizable portion of a massive glacier breaking off and collapsing into the lake underneath.

Filmed by Betsaida Hernandez at Los Glaciares National Park in Argentina, this video shows the extremely popular Perito Moreno Glacier in action as people are shocked as the portion breaks off.

The filmer commented. "This was the exact moment a part of the huge glacier fell off. Simply spectacular! No other words to describe this unreal scene.”

https://www.independent.co.uk/tv/climate/perito-moreno-glacier-bursts-ice-ve39d2531

It is not that spectacular but how many times have we seen this glacier before?

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Stephan

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #16 on: November 23, 2021, 09:19:53 PM »
This "calving" is really unspectular compared to what is available on youtube about this glacier.
But thanks for sharing.
It is too late just to be concerned about Climate Change