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Jim Hunt

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COP26 in Glasgow
« on: May 30, 2021, 12:07:58 PM »
The 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties, more succinctly referred to as COP26, takes place in Glasgow between the 1st and 12th of November 2021. VOC-21APR-02 (also known as the 'Indian variant of concern' of SARS-CoV-2 and/or B.1.617.2) and other VOCs permitting.

Officially the conference is being organised by the United Kingdom "in partnership with Italy", and the COP26 web site is also available in an Italian language version. According to the English language version:

Quote
The COP26 summit will bring parties together to accelerate action towards the goals of the Paris Agreement and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

The UK is committed to working with all countries and joining forces with civil society, companies and people on the frontline of climate change to inspire climate action ahead of COP26.

According to the COP26 YouTube Channel:

Quote
Sir David Attenborough [has been] named COP26 People’s Advocate ahead of crucial UN climate change summit.

As People’s Advocate, Sir David will attend major events in the international calendar to put forward the compelling case to key decision makers and the public for why climate action matters, to evidence the progress underway, and to highlight the actions decision makers will need to take ahead of and at COP26.



According to Sir David:

Quote
There could not be a more important moment that we should have international agreements. The epidemic has shown us how crucial it is to find agreement amongst nations if we're to solve such worldwide problems. But the problems that await us in the next 5 to 10 years are even greater.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2021, 12:13:08 PM by Jim Hunt »
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

Jim Hunt

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2021, 11:12:22 PM »
Here too is Alok Sharma, the "COP26 President-Designate", explaining:

Quote
How the UK is striving to make sure these two weeks are the moment that every country and every part of society embraces their responsibility to protect our planet.

Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

nanning

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2021, 09:13:11 AM »
This article is very much about emissions and environment and, since we are in a global emergency situation, I think it fits very well in this thread.



https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2021/may/30/should-we-all-stop-shopping-how-to-end-overconsumption
by Jamie Waters

Overconsumption and the environment: should we all stop shopping?


Over-consumption is at the root of the planet’s environmental crisis. One solution, proposed by author JB MacKinnon, is that we should simply buy less. But would that really work?



Excerpts (not full text):

The Day the World Stops Shopping, his new book, explores what might happen if the world transformed into a society that does not revolve around purchasing, one in which our primary role is not as consumers and our credit cards are not our most commonly deployed tools.

restructure society over several years to support a sustained reduction in the amount we consume.

Consumption – of fast fashion, flights, Black Friday-discounted gadgets – has become the primary driver of ecological crisis. We are devouring the planet’s resources at a rate 1.7 times faster than it can regenerate. The US population is 60% larger than it was in 1970, but consumer spending is up 400% (adjusted for inflation) – and other rich nations, including the UK, aren’t much better. “Many people would like to see the world consume fewer resources, yet we constantly avoid the most obvious means of achieving that,” says MacKinnon. “When people buy less stuff, you get immediate drops in emissions, resource consumption and pollution, unlike anything we’ve achieved with green technology.” That’s not to mention the impact materialism has on our mental health, inducing feelings of inadequacy and envy, and encouraging a culture of overworking.

“This is the best opportunity in the past 30 years to bring consumption back to the centre of the political discourse,” says MacKinnon

“I don’t think anybody is going to say that having a bunch of home-workout gear was as satisfying as being able to have contact with friends, family and neighbours.”

Many of us still shopped – Amazon enjoyed record-breaking global revenues of $386bn in 2020 – but, stripped of opportunities for parading possessions in front of others, there was a widespread rethink in why we buy and wear things.

Nonetheless, as much of the world begins to reopen, there are rallying cries to boost the economy by opening our wallets. Shopping has been cast as a positive act, retail therapy a civic duty. “All the narratives are building around a new Roaring 20s, a hedonistic binge, taking revenge on the virus with our consumption,” says MacKinnon. “But I think a lot of us are going to feel uncomfortable and disquieted, to the point of despair, as we remember what the fully revved-up consumer culture looks like.”

He wants us to act on that discomfort. But he’s not suggesting we live entirely off the land. In his hypothetical model he applies a 25% reduction in consumption – a figure “modest enough to be possible, dramatic enough to be earth-shattering” – and while he won’t specify a figure when discussing what our real-world efforts should be in the coming years, something in this ballpark might well be the goal.

“If you want a rule of thumb for how much impact you’re having as a consumer, the best one is: how much money are you spending? If it’s increasing, you’re probably increasing your impact; if it’s lowering, you’re probably lowering your impact.”

How might a lower-consuming society look? Everything is reoriented because people, brands and governments are no longer striving for economic growth. Individuals are more self-sufficient, growing food, mending things and embracing wabi-sabi, the Japanese concept of imperfect aesthetics (think patched-up pockets or chipped ceramics). Brands produce fewer but better-quality goods, while governments ban planned obsolescence (the practice of producing items to only function for a set period of time), stick “durability” labels on items so shoppers can be assured of longevity, and introduce tax subsidies so it’s cheaper to repair something than to bin it and buy a new version.


MacKinnon rejects my suggestion that perhaps consumerism is hard-wired into human nature, but says it is “deeply ingrained” in society and it’s “much easier for us to think, ‘Let’s make all these cars run on solar power instead of gas,’ rather than, ‘How do we end up with fewer cars?’” Plus, he says, “to some extent there was a point where we gave in to the idea that lowering consumption could not be a solution, because it inevitably results in economic collapse.”

Well, doesn’t it? Were we all to stop shopping overnight it would be disastrous, he admits, but if we built a new system, it could support a surprisingly robust economy. “If you’re producing durable goods, you still need considerable labour.

“there’s probably all kinds of different ways you can organise society around principles of lower consumption, none of which I think necessarily exists right now.”

Most importantly, being freed from the corporate rat-race means our work-life balance shifts. We compare ourselves less to others and have more time away from screens.
..
There are lots of opportunities, I think, for people to genuinely feel they have a higher quality of life.”


Over the decades various communities have practised “voluntary simplicity,” whether by choice or necessity. For the book, MacKinnon visited, among other places, sleepy Sado Island in the Sea of Japan; a farming community outside Tokyo; and the suburbs of Seattle where, since the 1990s, many folks have embraced “downshifting” in reaction to the city’s conquest by the moneyed tech crowd (the most widespread rejection of consumer culture in recent times).

In general, these people buy few clothes, read library books, walk or catch buses, avoid social media and rarely listen to music or watch TV. When I ask MacKinnon whether he noticed anything distinctive about them his face lights up. “Talking to somebody working in corporate America versus somebody who’s been practising voluntary simplicity for three decades is night and day, in terms of the kind of human being they are. It makes you want to be the voluntary simplicity person very much,” he says. “They make time for people and have more depth and generosity of spirit. At times, it did feel like I was talking to a more evolved being.”

“That’s the reality we need to confront, to some extent. We’re certainly not talking about a return to the Stone Age, but maybe we have to accept that a lower-consuming society isn’t an endless parade of distractions like the society we have today.”

Getting people to believe that this can be a satisfying existence will be the biggest hurdle. “When what you’ve known throughout your lifetime is what satisfaction you can draw from a consumeristic materialistic society, it’s very hard to imagine there’s an alternative that’s going to work as well or better,” he says. “But there is.”


Perhaps the book’s most startling comment comes from Abdullah al Maher, the CEO of a Bangladesh knitwear firm that produces for fast-fashion giants including H&M and Zara. He admits that transitioning to a lower-consuming society would be painful for his country: its 6,000 clothing factories would probably halve. But in this new system, the factories would provide better wages, pollute less and compete on quality instead of speed. “There’ll be no ratrace then,” Maher says, adding: “You know, it wouldn’t be so bad.”

It’s a striking statement from a powerful businessman in a nation that is a factory for the world. And it’s the sort of comment that gives MacKinnon confidence. “I’m hopeful that, coming out of the pandemic, people are going to have discussions that start to move the idea of reducing consumption back into the public discourse, from the fringes where it’s been for three decades,” he says.


Such conversations will involve tossing up whether we’re prepared to give up our vibrant, high-velocity, acquisitive lives in order to calm our minds and save the earth. Although we might not like the answer, and change is always uncomfortable, it’s tough to argue that there’s even a contest.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2021, 12:36:57 PM by nanning »
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

Jim Hunt

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2021, 03:10:12 PM »
Hi Nanning,

I'm not entirely sure that's the sort of future Alok has in mind when he says at 5:25 or thereabouts that:

Quote
It is a future that is still within our grasp, so long as we act now, and we act together, to limit the rise in global temperatures by building back greener, and building back better.
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

gerontocrat

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2021, 03:28:20 PM »
Find me a Government that has a stated policy of reducing economic activity.

Find me a Government that has accepted AGW that does not see renewable energy as a spur to economic growth.
_______________________________________________
ps: At the end of the article Guardian has added a footnote; an advert for author JB MacKinnon's book. Cost 20 quid but only £17.40 if you order it from the Guardian. i.e. a discount to encourage additional sales / economic activity.
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nukefix

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2021, 04:00:10 PM »
CO2-tax is sorely needed.

Iain

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2021, 08:55:53 PM »
Good find, Nanning, JB’s thinking aligns with what I have been thinking for a while.

When I spend £100,  I can choose what on – steaks, fruit and veg, flight to NY, a toaster.
Each has a different carbon cost per £ and I can see what it is, I can choose

But there is a secondary affect, because when I buy, what I’m really paying for is all the work which went into producing the goods or services. Some of the money for the toaster went to the retailer, the delivery driver…..the guy or gal who dug the iron ore out, all down the supply chain They all spend their wages on more stuff, causing more emissions

That affect would be zero if I’d saved the money for a rainy day / early retirement

I say the secondary “Induced emissions” are c. 0.75kg CO2/£ spent,
I took got that number from considering a middle class family (in work) who spend on consumer goods, flights on hols, meat, etc
Versus the same family, now with no work, because I and others have withheld it from them by not spending

Now they only buy the basics, with a much lower carbon footprint.

Solution – if the world went on a 4 day week, then production, earnings, spending, consumption and emissions would drop by almost exactly 1/5th. Enjoy the time off.

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/climate-change-carbon-emissions-family-household-flights-vegan-a9203096.html

<Edit - middle class income is £47k>
« Last Edit: May 31, 2021, 09:07:52 PM by Iain »
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etienne

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2021, 06:20:24 AM »
Buy nothing day is en event that started in 1992.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buy_Nothing_Day

It seems that it lost much of its importance the last years, and was oft linked to anti advertising actions. There used to be people collecting advertisement and dump them once a year in front of some official building. I guess this was around the year 2000.

I still have some links on my computer, most don't work anymore, but here are two that still work, but what they publish has changed :
http://www.casseursdepub.org/
https://www.adbusters.org/spoof-ads  became more human rights oriented

nanning

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2021, 08:18:28 AM »
To gerontocrat:
"i.e. a discount to encourage additional sales / economic activity."
If reading that book makes people change their ways according to the book, I can only see it as a positive catalyst. Especially if they get warmed to the idea and start spreading it around.

To Iain:
"Now they only buy the basics, with a much lower carbon footprint."
Exactly, it is the affluence part that does the real damage. The extra money and therefore the extra spending.
If only affluent people could be weaned of their material wishes and affluent services.

Imo one is happier if one only buys the basics (preferably of high quality and morality) and has no further material wishes etc. Contentment.

"<Edit - middle class income is £47k>"
I wonder, does that income put them in the top 1% bracket of richest people?
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

nukefix

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2021, 10:26:30 AM »
Exactly, it is the affluence part that does the real damage. The extra money and therefore the extra spending.
If only affluent people could be weaned of their material wishes and affluent services.
It is unlikely that people will cease to pay for services that make their life easier, if they can afford them. A carbon tax could steer consumption into less polluting sources and be helpful. On the other hand that is paying to pollute, so unless carbon offsetting actually works I'm not sure how moral this is.

Iain

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2021, 10:33:08 AM »
“CO2-tax is sorely needed.”
It is in place for petrol and diesel, so could be increased as a nudge to EVs
Not for heating oil – that is more of a necessity and would affect the old and vulnerable

VAT – Value Added Tax – at 20% is charged on most consumer goods, if increased it would affect the big spenders more, but the low spenders buying just one TV too. A tax free allowance or ration would be fairer, but difficult to administer.

“"<Edit - middle class income is £47k>"
I wonder, does that income put them in the top 1% bracket of richest people?”
£47k net (per person) is in the top 10%, £100k is in the top 2%, £120k for the top 1%

Agreed, need a curb on advertising, take back freewill.
"If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants." Isaac Newton

nanning

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2021, 11:28:59 AM »
I think a carbon tax is vulnerable to 'creative' accounting.
Perhaps I am too careful because of the failing carbon offset-scheme.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2021, 01:52:20 PM »
How might a lower-consuming society look?

Somewhat like the great depression for those employees of the 3,000 Bangladeshi factories which close.

Consumerism was a deliberate policy decision to make sure a great depression never happened again.  Of course social systems, social security and a whole host of other controls are now in place, but you won't get a government voting to put half it's workers out of work.  It is simply not going to happen.

Let us take the discussion about that 3,000 reduction in factories.  So we'd have to pay more, less would be produced, things would be less stressed.  Really?  For whom?

Now if the owner had said "yes we'll keep all 6,000 factories online and charge you more for less", then, yes, things would be less stressed and better paid.  But that is not what was said.  Half the output, half the factories, keep the workers in the same conditions, rake in the profits.

What about the other employees, the one's whose factory was closed down?  Crushing and abject poverty and even higher prices for the goods they can't afford.

There is no simple "one size fits all" solution to this problem and, when it comes to renewable energy, there is certainly no politically or personally acceptable solution to all the people.

This leaves us with fiscal controls.

But just remember that the carbon tax on the poor  sod who is driving a 15 year old car, just managing to pay the fuel to and from work and feed the family, is going to drive a whole section of the community deeper into poverty.

Far from this wonderful nirvana of "such a better world", the vast number of disadvantaged will be even more disadvantaged.

And they have a vote.

So we try to apply blanket restrictions to fix a problem and they will apply a blanket vote to stop us.

This situation requires a far more astute response and a far more sensitive response.

Now if you want to talk 50% luxury tax on goods which the average worker won't ever afford, then, maybe.  Perhaps a fuel limit before higher taxation kicks in, so those who need to drive to work can and those who just want to travel distance can look at the cost of switching to EV.  After all they can afford it.

I so often see the suggestions that this more simple world would benefit "the common man".  Nothing is further from the truth.  It is this complicated and overconsuming world that has allowed the "common man" to get out from the grinding life of hard work and poverty.

However the faster we move to EV and renewable energy, the sooner older EV will be available to the second hand car market and the sooner the "common man" will be able to consume cleanly.

Flights, yes, if you must. I remember flying before Easyjet came along.  The cheapest flight return, Edinburgh/London, was around £250 - £350.  Now you can do that for £25 to £30 if you time it right.  So there is room for change.

No reason why holiday flights shouldn't attract 100% taxes.  The only thing is, I believe, that those who use these holidays to escape their lives will simply pull out the plastic and pay it off all year.  Which doesn't fix the problem and doesn't improve their lives.
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Iain

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2021, 01:09:40 PM »
“Somewhat like the great depression”
4 day week for all. 4/5ths wages, Everyone keeps their jobs.
Taper gradually (40h week, 39, 38) so the market adjusts and you can tell your landlord in advance to expect less in rent.

“And they have a vote.”
Yes, so has to be sellable to them. Would you like some time off to de-stress and play footie with the kids? Downside is you get a smaller telly.

Rationing and tax on flights - easy to check when the booking form has a Question - “Is this the first flight you have taken this year” Do some random (or bulk) checks from passport control scans and make an example of the miscreants.
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kassy

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2021, 01:54:14 PM »
The problem is that there are some climatic bounds which we need to stay in to even have a chance to keep our modern world (many demage and thus money loss are already locked in).
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Jim Hunt

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2021, 02:21:21 PM »
Yes, so has to be sellable to them.

Meanwhile Alok'n'Allegra's advertising campaign continues. Since the G7 Summit next week is being held here in Cornwall, they have recently paid a visit to the once Great Britain's "world beating" geothermal energy drilling site at the Eden Project:

Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

Iain

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #16 on: June 03, 2021, 02:34:37 PM »
"(many demage and thus money loss are already locked in)."

Not sure what you mean there - can you expand on it
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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #17 on: June 03, 2021, 09:31:31 PM »
Yes sure. We had the luxury to first keep spending money to make more money because ´future tech´ which we hardly invested in (on a global scale) would make solving the problem cheaper over the long run that is no longer an option. Lots of what we are doing now we should have start investing in 20 years ago or so.

Now we and our kids and grandkids will have to spend money on sucking CO2 out of the air but we will also have to spend money fighting coastal erosion/relocating cities etc. While on the other side of the balance damage from climate disasters stacks up.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Jim Hunt

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2021, 02:20:31 PM »
An intriguing discussion on Twitter, involving Kevin Anderson and yours truly amongst others:

https://twitter.com/keithalexander/status/1400769160813162497

Are there any Kate Raworth "doughnut" fans in the ASIF house?

Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2021, 11:23:39 AM »
An intriguing discussion on Twitter, involving Kevin Anderson and yours truly amongst others:

https://twitter.com/keithalexander/status/1400769160813162497

Are there any Kate Raworth "doughnut" fans in the ASIF house?



I am a fan of the donut economy.
Huge fan, even.

gerontocrat

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2021, 09:05:09 PM »
Are donuts junk food?

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1LfeLF7hOkecQDdD9FKYu_Y00LVzeiTX6/view
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-57839368

Climate change: 'No more excuses' at COP26 climate summit - poor nations
More than 100 developing countries have set out their key negotiating demands ahead of the COP26 climate meeting in Glasgow.

Quote
These include funding for poorer nations to fight and adapt to climate change and compensation for the impacts they will be subjected to.

Those backing the plan represent more than half of the world's countries.

Without progress on these points, they say that COP26 will be worthless and will end in failure.

COP26 in November is expected to be the most important meeting on climate change since the Paris agreement was drawn up in 2015 and there are huge expectations*** that it will deliver significant progress in the battle against rising temperatures.


*** Protestors mocked G7 leaders meeting in Cornwall for not doing more on climate change

But this new position paper is a warning shot from more than 100 of the world's poorer countries, which are dismayed by the lack of progress they've seen so far - particularly at the G7 meeting in the UK in June.

They've set out five key issues which they say are critical for them in the negotiations:

Cutting emissions:
Despite some progress, the sum total of climate policies in place will not keep global warming within the limits that governments agreed in Paris in 2015. An acceleration of net zero targets is urgently needed, led by those with the biggest responsibility and capacity.

Finance:
At the failed Copenhagen COP in 2009, richer countries promised $100bn a year in climate finance by 2020, with increased annual sums from 2025. That target has not been met, say the developing countries - and it needs fixing if they are to trust the richer countries to keep to what they negotiate. This fund is intended to help those lower-income countries adapt to and fight climate change.

Adaptation:
The developing countries are calling for at least 50% of climate finance to be used to help the most vulnerable to adapt to the effects of global warming.

Loss and damage:
The historical failure of richer countries to cut their emissions adequately means that the most vulnerable are already experiencing permanent losses and damage. Responsibilities have to be acknowledged, say the poorer countries and promised measures delivered.

Implementation:
Since Paris, rich and poor have haggled over issues like carbon trading and transparency. The developing countries want to see these questions finally resolved and want all countries to agree five-year common timeframes for their national climate plans.


"Highly vulnerable countries like Somalia are already suffering disproportionally from the impacts of climate change," said Mahdi M Gulaid, deputy prime minister of Somalia, one of the countries behind the plan.

"COP 26 must be a key moment of delivery and there can be no more excuses for unfulfilled promises, particularly climate finance."

The poorer nations draw parallels with the Covid-19 pandemic. They say that a failure to deliver vaccines and debt relief after Covid, will send a signal to these countries that they will be alone when climate impacts bite harder.

"Despite Covid understandably taking the headlines, climate change has been getting worse over the past year as emissions continue to rise and the lives and livelihoods on the front line suffer," said Sonam P Wangdi of Bhutan, who will chair the Least Developed Countries Group at COP26.

"COP26 needs to be a summit where we see action not words. We have enough plans: what we need is for major economies to start delivering on their promises. Our economies are suffering in the face of increased climate impacts and budgetary strains: either we invest our way out of this mess or we face a brutal decade of loss and damage."

In the report, the countries lay out what's termed a "fair share accounting", which allocates emissions cuts based on historical responsibility and the capacity to act.

Under that scenario, the US would need to reduce emissions by 195% below 2005 levels by 2030. This could be made up of a 70% cut in domestic emissions plus $80bn a year in support for developing countries.

For the UK, a similar approach would see a 70% emissions cut by 2030 plus $46bn a year in climate finance.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
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gerontocrat

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2021, 09:51:05 AM »
If the promises by the President of the USA are not at least partly reality by November, most of the rest of the world will not be willing to make a worthwhile deal. Cop26 will be Copout26

Just one man can stop Biden, the Democrat Senator Joe Manchin - and it looks like he will do just that.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/jul/20/joe-manchin-big-oil-democratic-senator
The Democrat blocking progressive change is beholden to big oil. Surprised?
Joe Manchin owns millions of dollars in coal stock, founded an energy firm and Exxon lobbyists brag about their access to him. Republicans fundraise on his behalf


Quote
As “thousand-year” heat waves caused by the climate crisis rock the west coast and biblical floods engulf major cities, Senate Democrats are negotiating a $3.5tn budget package that could include an attempt to slow the use of fossil fuels over the next decade.

One prominent senator is very concerned about proposals to scale back oil, gas and coal usage. He recently argued that those who want to “get rid of” fossil fuels are wrong. Eliminating fossil fuels won’t help fight global heating, he claimed, against all evidence. “If anything, it would be worse.”

Which rightwing Republican uttered these false, climate crisis-denying words?

Wrong question. The speaker was a Democrat: Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia.

West Virginia is a major coal-producing state. But Manchin’s investment in dirty energy goes far beyond the economic interests of the voters who elect him every six years. In fact, coal has made Manchin and his family very wealthy. He founded the private coal brokerage Enersystems in 1988 and still owns a big stake in the company, which his son currently runs.

In 2020 alone, Manchin raked in nearly $500,000 of income from Enersystems, and he owns as much as $5m worth of stock in the company, according to his most recent financial disclosure.

Despite this conflict of interest, Manchin chairs the influential Senate energy and natural resources committee, which has jurisdiction over coal production and distribution, coal research and development, and coal conversion, as well as “global climate change”.

He even gave a pro-coal speech in May to the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) while personally profiting from Enersystems’ coal sales to utility companies that are EEI members, as Sludge recently reported.

Manchin is one of many members of Congress who are personally invested in the fossil fuel industry – dozens of Congress members hold Exxon stock – but he is among the biggest profiters. As of late 2019, he had more money invested in dirty energy than any other senator.

How can this be? Wouldn’t basic ethics prevent someone from being in charge of legislation that could materially benefit them? Unfortunately, conflict-of-interest rules in the Senate are remarkably weak. And guess who is seeking to strip conflict-of-interest rules from a 2021 democracy reform bill?

His proposal “leaves out language that S 1 would add to federal statute prohibiting lawmakers from working on bills primarily for furthering their financial interests”, Sludge reported.

Manchin, the most conservative Democrat in the Senate, has used the evenly split chamber to block Joe Biden’s agenda. In the process he has become arguably the most powerful person in Washington. Hardly any Democratic legislation can pass without his vote.

That’s a problem – especially given that Manchin sometimes seems like he’s an honorary Republican. Earlier this month the Texas Tribune and other publications reported that Manchin was heading to Texas for a fundraiser hosted by several major Republican donors, including oil billionaires.

Manchin, along with Senator Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, has vowed to protect the filibuster – a rule, frequently used to empower white supremacists, that requires 60 votes for most Senate bills to pass. That includes vital voting rights legislation, passed by the House, that is the only way to stop the Republican party from eviscerating what’s left of our democracy in the name of the “big lie” of voter fraud.

Because of his uniquely powerful position as a swing vote, Manchin can rewrite major legislation to his liking – effectively dictating the legislative agendas of Congress and the White House.

It appears that Manchin will have his way with the White House’s infrastructure package as well, and his changes will probably be more devastating, given the climate emergency we live in.

Manchin isn’t just sticking up for the coal industry and his family’s generational wealth; he’s doing the bidding of oil and gas executives, who also stand to lose money if the nation transitions away from toxic fuels.

Manchin’s political campaigns are fueled by the dirty energy industry. Over the past decade, his election campaigns have received nearly $65,000 from disastrously dishonest oil giant Exxon’s lobbyists, its corporate political action committee, and the lobbying firms that Exxon works with. A top Exxon lobbyist recently bragged about his access to Manchin.

In the 2018 election cycle, his most recent, Manchin’s campaign got more money from oil and gas Pacs and employees than any other Senate Democrat except then North Dakota senator Heidi Heitkamp. Manchin was also the mining industry’s top Democratic recipient in Congress that cycle.


If Biden wants to have any kind of legacy, he needs to stand up to Manchin, a member of his own party, and work with the Senate majority leader, Chuck Schumer, to get him in line. I don’t fully know why Biden permits the West Virginian to dictate his own presidential policy agenda. But what is crystal clear is that the leader of the United States should be doing a whole lot more.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2021, 10:55:33 PM »
Oh Dear. Things are noty going that well.... too much blah blah and a dearth of real action.

https://www.reuters.com/world/g20-loath-commit-climate-meeting-tussle-over-carbon-wording-2021-07-23/
G20 fails to agree on climate goals in communique
Quote

NAPLES, July 23 (Reuters) - Energy and environment ministers from the Group of 20 rich nations have failed to agree on the wording of key climate change commitments in their final communique, Italy's Ecological Transition Minister Roberto Cingolani said on Friday.

The G20 meeting was seen as a decisive step ahead of United Nations climate talks, known as COP 26, which take place in 100 days' time in Glasgow in November.

The failure to agree common language ahead of that gathering is likely to be seen as a setback to hopes of securing a meaningful accord in Scotland.

Cingolani told reporters that the ministers could not agree on two disputed issues which would now have to be discussed at a G20 summit in Rome in October.

"Commitments made today lack substance and ambition. It is now up to G20 heads of state and government to discard this document at the October leaders' summit," said online activist network Avaaz.

Italy holds the rotating presidency of the G20, and Cingolani, as chairman of the two-day gathering, said negotiations with China, Russia and India had proved especially tough.

Cingolani said that in the end China and India had declined to sign the two contested points.

One of these was phasing out coal power, which most countries wanted to achieve by 2025 but some said would be impossible for them.


The other concerned the wording surrounding a 1.5-2 degree Celsius limit on global temperature increases that was set by the 2015 Paris Agreement.

"Some countries wanted to go faster than what was agreed in Paris and to aim to cap temperatures at 1.5 degrees within a decade, but others, with more carbon based economies, said let's just stick to what was agreed in Paris," Cingolani said.

The final communique, which had been due to be published on Friday, would probably not now be released until Saturday, he added.

Ahead of COP 26, environmental activists had hoped that the G20 gathering would lead to a strengthening of climate targets, new commitments on climate financing, and an increase in countries committing to net zero emissions by 2050.

"The G20 is failing to deliver. Italy's G20 tagline is 'People, Planet, Prosperity', but today the G20 is delivering 'Pollution, Poverty and Paralysis," said Avaaz.

Despite the two points of disagreement, Cingolani said the G20 had put together a 58-point communique and that all the countries agreed that decarbonisation was a necessary goal.

"This is the first time that the G20 has accepted that climate and energy policies are closely interconnected," he said when asked which aspect of the package he was most pleased with.

"What happened today would have been unthinkable four months ago," he added.

Ahead of the full communique, the Italian presidency released a summary of the deal, under headings such as "the fight against climate change," "clean energy", "climate financing, "research and development" and "smart cities."

It referred to a 2009 accord that developed nations should together contribute $100 billion each year by 2020 in climate finance to poorer countries, many of which are grappling with rising seas, storms and droughts made worse by climate change. That target has yet to be met.

Nonetheless the Italian presidency summary said the pledge "remains central", and there was "a commitment to increase contributions every year until 2025".
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

vox_mundi

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #23 on: July 25, 2021, 12:53:29 AM »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― anonymous

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

gerontocrat

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #24 on: July 25, 2021, 10:43:58 AM »
The morphing of COP26 to CopOut26 continues....

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jul/25/plans-of-four-g20-states-are-threat-to-global-climate-pledge-warn-scientists
Plans of four G20 states are threat to global climate pledge, warn scientists

‘Disastrous’ energy policies of China, Russia, Brazil and Australia could stoke 5C rise in temperatures if adopted by the rest of the world
Quote
A key group of leading G20 nations is committed to climate targets that would lead to disastrous global warming, scientists have warned. They say China, Russia, Brazil and Australia all have energy policies associated with 5C rises in atmospheric temperatures, a heating hike that would bring devastation to much of the planet.

The analysis, by the peer-reviewed group Paris Equity Check, raises serious worries about the prospects of key climate agreements being achieved at the Cop26 summit in Glasgow in three months. The conference – rated as one of the most important climate summits ever staged – will attempt to hammer out policies to hold global heating to 1.5C by agreeing on a global policy for ending net emissions of greenhouse gases by 2050.

The EU and UK have outlined emission pledges that could bring the world close to these aspirations. However, those of China, Russia, Brazil and Australia – which remain reliant on continued fossil-fuel burning – would trigger temperature rises of 5C if followed by the rest of the world. This dramatic discrepancy reveals a deep division over the energy and environment policies of the world’s richest nations. “Without more ambition from China, Brazil, Russia and Australia, Cop26 will fail to deliver the future our planet needs,” warned Tanya Steele, chief executive at WWF.

and blah blah blah blah

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jul/21/climate-crisis-glacier-diana-six-ecologist
Top US scientist : ‘I’ve gone from being an ecologist to a coroner’
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
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Iain

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #25 on: July 25, 2021, 02:48:12 PM »
"......if adopted by the rest of the world"

Worth bearing in mind the population of the G20 consumes significantly more per person than the RoW.

"If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants." Isaac Newton

gerontocrat

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #26 on: August 02, 2021, 09:04:39 PM »
Please can someone find me a positive headline?

https://www.climatechangenews.com/2021/07/31/china-india-miss-uns-extended-deadline-climate-pledges/
China, India miss UN’s extended deadline for climate pledges

110 parties to the Paris Agreement have submitted updated 2030 climate targets to be counted by UN Climate Change before Cop26, but some major emitters’ are still missing

Some of the world’s largest emitters have missed the UN’s extended deadline for submitting updated climate plans to be included in an assessment of progress towards the Paris Agreement goals ahead of Cop26.

Quote
Countries had until midnight central European time on Friday to submit their plans to UN Climate Change, with emissions cutting targets for 2030.

Just over half of all parties to the Paris Agreement, 110, made the deadline with an estimated 40% of them from climate vulnerable nations – a tally UN Climate Change described as “far from satisfactory”.

There was a rush of submissions this week with Guinea, Israel, Oman, Zambia, Tanzania, Seychelles, Namibia, Nigeria, Malawi, Sri Lanka, Samoa, Malaysia, Barbados, Sao Tome and Principe, and Sierra Leone getting their plans in. US and Canada are among the major economies to have submitted since the last count.

But some of the world’s largest emitters, including China, India, Saudi Arabia and South Africa, have remained silent.

Alex Scott, think tank E3G’s climate diplomacy lead, told Climate Home News that leadership on 2030 emissions reductions plans was still coming from small island developing states and developing nations “whose emissions are towered by G20 countries”.

Under the Paris Agreement, 2020 was the year countries were expected to present improved climate plans to UN Climate Change as part of a ratchet mechanism to meet the accord’s goals. But the coronavirus pandemic derailed the process.

A UN synthesis report published in February, which took into account updated plans submitted to the UN by the end of 2020, found that collective ambition was “very far” from putting the world on track to limit global heating to 1.5C.

At the time, only 75 countries covering around 30% of global emissions had submitted updated plans, including the EU and UK. Their pledges were estimated to reduce emissions by just 0.5% between 2010 and 2030. Scott said the findings had come as a “reality check” and had helped “build a stronger political narrative for the outcome at Cop26 to be a pathway for how countries are going to act faster to keep 1.5C within reach”.

A backdrop of extreme heat in Northern America, devastating flooding in Europe and China and intense wildfires in Siberia and Turkey have further underlined the urgency for major emitters to curb emissions.

But despite some renewed political momentum, the picture isn’t likely to change much without enhanced action from emerging economies. Niklas Höhne, a climate policy expert at the NewClimate Institute, told Climate Home News there remained a “gigantic gap” between current levels of emissions and the action needed by 2030.

Commitments made as of April would still lead to 2.4C of warming by the end of the century if implemented in full, according to Climate Action Tracker.  “With all the pledges on the table we are basically stabilising global emissions by 2030 when we should be cutting them by half,” said Höhne.

Leading scientists at the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have said emissions should fall 45% from 2010 levels by 2030 to limit temperatures to 1.5C by the end of the century.

The picture for long-term goals is slightly better. NewClimate Institute’s latest estimates found that if all net zero emissions goals are met, the world could limit temperatures to 2C, in the most optimistic scenario, by the end of the century, said Höhne. “The long-term ambition has improved significantly in the last six months but it has not propagated to short-term ambition and short-term action,” he added.

During a meeting of climate and ministers last week, all G20 countries agreed to “update or communicate ambitious NDCs by Cop26”.

Among those to have already submitted, Australia, Brazil, Mexico and Russia put forward emissions targets to the UN identical to or weaker than their previous versions, Climate Action Tracker found. Earlier this month, Indonesia updated its NDC, with unchanged headline targets but plans to peak emissions by 2030 and strengthened sectoral policies.

UN Climate Change head Patricia Espinosa said the UN had called on countries that have already presented their plans “to look at them again, and if possible, come up with revised NDCs”. 

China, which is responsible for around 27% of global emissions, is only proposing an incremental strengthening of its 2030 climate plan, which Climate Action Tracker rates as “highly insufficient” to meet the Paris goals.

“Cop26 is the good faith actor test for China,” Li Shuo, of Greenpeace East Asia, told Climate Home News.

Ultimately, there is going to be nowhere to hide at Cop26. Each of us will be in the spotlight,” warned Cop26 president designate Alok Sharma during a press conference on Monday.****

**** "Nowhere to hide" includes the host, the UK, where reality also falls far short of blah blah.

"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Alphabet Hotel

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #27 on: August 04, 2021, 04:51:42 PM »
Boris Johnson’s conference on climate change is already in deep water

https://www.standard.co.uk/comment/comment/boris-johnson-conference-climate-change-already-deep-water-b949138.html

Quote
Where people say Paris and Kyoto, now they will also say Glasgow, the PM decreed. But it isn’t working out like that. COP26 opens on October 31 and is already in deep trouble. That in turn spells trouble for Johnson. There are four reasons. First, there is still no international consensus on what should be agreed in Glasgow. That agreement was supposed to be the last act of three. If Kyoto in 1997 was about agreeing there is a problem, and Paris in 2015 was about setting a target to tackle it (limiting the Earth’s temperature rise to 1.5C), Glasgow was to be about working out how to do that. The tricky bit, in other words.

gerontocrat

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #28 on: August 04, 2021, 11:37:40 PM »
The writer suggests COP26 can't work because.....
"Capitalism is a machine made to squeeze every last cent out of this planet until there is nothing left. We can either fool ourselves about that until it kills us, or we can change it."

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/aug/04/climate-change-crisis-environment-politics
Our leaders look climate change in the eyes, and shrug
Hamilton Nolan

It is not good to be too pessimistic on the climate crisis. That said, it sure does seem like we’re screwed


Quote
If you have cultivated an Edgar Allen Poe-like appreciation for the macabre, there is a certain sort of amusement to be had in watching the developed world deal with the insistent onslaught of climate change. Like many horror stories, this one features a main character full of futile determination to maintain a sense of normalcy even as the ominous signs of doom become ever more impossible to ignore. We can chuckle knowing that the monster is going to come for our designated protectors. We stop chuckling knowing that it’s coming for all of us next.

It is easy to imagine that a real live existential threat to our way of life would prompt any society to assume war footing and marshal everything it has to fight for survival. Unfortunately, this response only takes hold in actual war situations, where the threat is “other people that we can shoot and kill in glorious fashion”. When the threat comes not from enemy people, but from our own nature, we find it much harder to rise to the occasion. Where is the glory in recognizing the folly of our own greed and profligacy? Leaders are not elected on such things. We want leaders who will give us more, leading us ever onwards, upwards and into the grave.

The latest demonstration of this comes from the G20, that coalition that is as good a proxy as any for the combined will of the world’s richest countries. The latest G20 meeting wrapped up last week without firm commitments on phasing out coal power, or on what steps nations will promise to take to try to hold global warming to 1.5C. This goal is both necessary and, perhaps, unlikely – a report by scientists found that China, Russia, Brazil and Australia are all pursuing policies that could lead to a cataclysmic five degrees of warming.

The G20 is a perfect model of our collective failure to build institutions capable of coping with deep, long-term, existential problems that cannot be solved by building more weapons. On the one hand, the head of the United Nations says that there is no way for the world to meet its 1.5C warming goal without the leadership of the G20; on the other hand, a recent analysis found that G20 members have, in the past five years, paid $3.3tn in subsidies for fossil fuel production and consumption. The same group that claims to be bailing out humanity’s sinking ship with one hand is busily setting it aflame with the other hand. It is not good to be too pessimistic on climate change, because we must maintain the belief that we can win this battle if we are to have any hope at all. That said, it sure does seem like we’re screwed.

As overwhelming and omnipresent as the climate crisis is, it is not the core issue. The core issue is capitalism. Capitalism’s unfettered pursuit of economic growth is what caused climate change, and capitalism’s inability to reckon with externalities – the economic term for a cost that falls onto third parties – is what is preventing us from solving climate change. Indeed, climate change itself is the ultimate negative externality: fossil-fuel companies and assorted polluting corporations and their investors get all the benefits, and the rest of the world pays the price. Now the entire globe finds itself trapped in the gruesome logic of capitalism, where it is perfectly rational for the rich to continue doing something that is destroying the earth, as long as the profits they reap will allow them to insulate themselves from the consequences.

Congratulations, free market evangelists: this is the system you have built. It doesn’t work. I don’t want to lean too heavily on the touchy-feely, Gaia-esque interpretation of global warming as the inevitable wounds of an omniscient Mother Earth, but you must admit that viewing humanity and its pollution as a malicious virus set to be eradicated by nature is now a fairly compelling metaphor. Homo sapiens rose above the lesser animals thanks to our ability to wield logic and reason, yet we have somehow gotten ourselves to a place where the knowledge of what is driving all these wildfires and floods is not enough to enable us to do anything meaningful to stop it.

The keystone experience of global capitalism is to gape at a drought-fueled fire as it consumes your home, and then go buy a bigger SUV to console yourself.

This year, the G20 is patting itself on the back for “[recognizing] carbon pricing as a potential tool to address climate change for the first time in an official communique”. This would have been encouraging 30 years ago, when we should have established a carbon tax after it became clear that carbon emissions cause tangible damage to the environment. In 2021, this sort of diplomatic marginalia is the equivalent of a child on the Titanic proudly showing his parents his completed homework, just as the ship slips beneath the waves.

Of course we need a price on carbon. Of course we need extremely strict emissions regulations, massive green energy investments, and a maniacal focus on sustainability fierce enough to radically change a society that is built to promote unlimited consumption. But, to be honest, there is little indication that we will get those things any time soon. The path we are on, still, is not one that leads to a happy ending. Rather, it is one that leads to the last billionaire standing on dry land blasting off in his private rocket as the rest of us drown in rising seas.

Capitalism is a machine made to squeeze every last cent out of this planet until there is nothing left. We can either fool ourselves about that until it kills us, or we can change it.

Hamilton Nolan is a writer based in New York
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
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blu_ice

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #29 on: August 05, 2021, 09:54:40 AM »
Unfortunately it’s not only the capitalist system that’s wrecking the climate. The former communist block’s planned economies weren’t any better for the environment.

Iain

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #30 on: August 05, 2021, 11:23:15 AM »
I say it's Consumerism rather than Capitalism which is the problem, and that's down to individuals.

e.g. If everyone stops buying palm oil products, the capitalists clearing native forest for their plantations will go bust pretty quickly. The orangutans would be relieved.

Capitalism needs consumers to consume and consumers are individuals who can think for themselves.

e.g.

If everyone bought a bicycle, the oil companies...
If everyone ate less meat....
If everyone stopped buying things they remember seeing advertised...
If everyone saved for an early retirement...

"the rich to continue doing something that is destroying the earth"

That's us, the rich Westeners. Anyone here want to declare they are not consumers, not contributing to climate change?

They can cast the first stone.





"If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants." Isaac Newton

gerontocrat

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #31 on: August 05, 2021, 11:07:31 PM »
I say it's Consumerism rather than Capitalism which is the problem, and that's down to individuals.

e.g. If everyone stops buying palm oil products, the capitalists clearing native forest for their plantations will go bust pretty quickly. The orangutans would be relieved.

Capitalism needs consumers to consume and consumers are individuals who can think for themselves.
I say it's Consumerism rather than Capitalism which is the problem, and that's down to individuals.

Big Oil has adopted that playbook - especially ExxonMobil. It's a variation on part of the Tobacco playbook - if people hadn't wanted to smoke we would not have made cigarettes and people would not have died of lung cancer. So if people didn't want to drive we would not be producing oil.

Has anybody never been persuaded to do something agianst their will from peer pressure?
Is the ziillions of dollars spent on marketing a waste of money?

Now behavioural scientists have shown that AI can be used to influence people's thinking and decisions. Soon AI will be an integral part of marketing, including the marketing of beliefs.

To make the decisions identified above already requires the average person to set himself against the society he or she ives in, and it will get worse as even Governments are wedded to ever-increasing GDP.

Consumerism is the result, not the cause of the crisis we face, and Capitalism made it happen.

ps: Marx/Leninism claimed that dialectical materialism in a planned economy would ensure the people had an ever-increasing supply of goods. It failed, most people under communism consumed far less per capita than us in the West.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2021, 11:28:19 PM by gerontocrat »
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
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blu_ice

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #32 on: August 06, 2021, 09:25:23 AM »
Quote
It failed, most people under communism consumed far less per capita than us in the West.
That’s correct, but it wasn’t their intention to consume less. They were able to consume less because the system was inefficient. To ”fix” this the Chinese even changed the economic model while keeping the underlying ideology. They managed to kickstart a spectacular economic growth and became the largest emitter.

Modern capitalism and communism are both born from modern industrialization. They are two sides of the same coin. To end overconsumption we must replace them with something else completely. Something that is not aiming for ever increasing material consumption. To make it work people both rich and poor must buy it voluntarily. A tall order?

Iain

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #33 on: August 06, 2021, 02:30:46 PM »
WRT COP26, remember the leaders can only move forward at a pace their electorate will accept.
If they propose or apply more draconian measures, they will lose the next election and those measures will not be implemented or reversed by the incoming govt.

“Consumerism is the result, not the cause of the crisis we face”
FTAoD I’ll drop Consumer-ism (more than one definition) and go straight to Consumption.
The more consumption, the greater is the damage to our planet – forced warming from GHG, loss of habitat, pollution on land sea and atmosphere.

Advertising (even powerful targeted ads) don’t work on everyone, besides we all have to accept the consequences of our actions. Pleading "It wasn't me - they made me do it" won't impress the jury.

If that attitude predominates, the transition will be slow.

My own philosophy is to derive a benefit for myself with less consumption - work a 4 day week, save more, have more time off, retire early. That way my , lifetime impact on the planet is less (though still much more than those in the 3rd world)

GDP growth is still possible, e.g. we can consume renewable energy with minimal affect on the planet, meat once cheap artificial protien is available for beef cattle feed, shampoo with synthetic palm oil....

In Science fiction, a civilisation has achieved the status of "Civilisation 1" once it can harvest all the energy from it's nearest star. I don't mean all falling on the fraction of a minute of arc of the home planet, I mean all. We still have a way to go.


"If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants." Isaac Newton

vox_mundi

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #34 on: August 06, 2021, 03:05:18 PM »
Global Economic Policies Driving Toward a Climate Crisis
https://phys.org/news/2021-08-global-economic-policies-climate-crisis.html

International research into global climate models involving the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) shows that current worldwide economic policies are in danger of leading nations away from emission and global warming targets.

The study, carried out by leading international academics and published in Nature Energy, shows that existing growth-driven economic scenarios rely heavily on increased energy use in the future, and the use of carbon capture and storage technologies which are as-yet untested on a commercial scale.

The article calls instead for diversification in these existing models and highlights the need to consider alternative post-growth scenarios in order to meet climate and emissions obligations set by the Paris Agreement.

Existing scenarios of climate mitigation rely on unproven technologies and improved efficiency of our economies, but do not consider the need for societal and economic transformations. "Take for example the question of negative emissions. Most scenarios assume it is perfectly feasible to transform the land of the size of India into a bioenergy plantation yet find it impossible to assume that rich countries could at some point stop growing their economies, even though growth is proven to be a major driver of environmental impacts," says Giorgos Kallis, ICTA-UAB researcher and co-author of the study.

Researchers explain that post-growth policies maintain a stable economy and support the social and societal needs of the population without economic growth. As an example, Spain outperforms the U.S. in certain key social indicators such as life expectancy despite having 55% less GDP per capita.

They insist on the need for policy interventions in areas such as transportation, industry, agriculture, construction and city planning. "These include extending product warranties, rights to repair, minimizing food waste, reducing reliance on industrial farming methods, promoting maintenance over new construction, and improving the energy efficiency of existing buildings,"

"In the article, we propose an alternative approach to avoiding dangerous climate change which does not depend on the success of dystopian 'technofixes'", explains Aljoša Slameršak, researcher at the ICTA-UAB. He adds that "post-growth calls for rich countries to move away from economic growth and focus instead on provisioning for human needs and well-being, such as by reducing inequality, ensuring living wages, shortening the working week to maintain full employment, and guaranteeing universal access to public healthcare, education, transportation, energy, water and affordable housing."

Jason Hickel et al, Urgent need for post-growth climate mitigation scenarios, Nature Energy (2021)
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41560-021-00884-9

-------------------------------------------
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― anonymous

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

kassy

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #35 on: August 06, 2021, 08:04:11 PM »
WRT COP26, remember the leaders can only move forward at a pace their electorate will accept.
If they propose or apply more draconian measures, they will lose the next election and those measures will not be implemented or reversed by the incoming govt.

If that is the measure you have the same problem as when you are waiting on the last individual to come along.

It fails to acknowledge the danger we are exposing our society too. We did not wait for regulating the CFC gasses although those changes of course had much less impact.

The big problem is that most of us grew up in the problem. The big growth is all from 1950 to now. Actually quite amazing if you think about it. What we must not forget is that our wealth was not a natural reward for our good society building skills. Yes a part came from technological gains but lots also comes from stealing resources from all over the world and from the future and living way beyond our means (grandkids might need groundwater too etc).

I rather doubt the people or our ´leaders´ will get it in time but lets see what they come up with first.



Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Rod

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #36 on: August 07, 2021, 03:57:46 AM »
Sneak Peek of the IPCC report from Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at Texas A&M University.

I think this pretty much sums things up . . .


Also, as a former Aggie, I like this guy 😉
« Last Edit: August 07, 2021, 04:34:58 AM by Rod »

KiwiGriff

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #37 on: August 07, 2021, 04:16:59 AM »
Very good Rod.
One very small quibble.
"It is all happening" should read "is starting to happen" ...
We ain't seen nothing yet.
It is going to get a whole lot worse ...very quickly.
Animals can be driven crazy by placing too many in too small a pen. Homo sapiens is the only animal that voluntarily does this to himself.
Notebooks of Lazarus Long.
Robert Heinlein.

gerontocrat

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #38 on: August 07, 2021, 08:07:28 AM »
WRT COP26, remember the leaders can only move forward at a pace their electorate will accept.
If they propose or apply more draconian measures, they will lose the next election and those measures will not be implemented or reversed by the incoming govt.
So let's play the game of consequences.

Start
WRT COP26, remember the leaders can only move forward at a pace their electorate will accept.

The consequence is:

Best COP26 can only come up with some sort of limited compromise.

Worst COP26 ends with no agreement and recriminations all round. Blah-blah communiqué issued

The consequence of Best
By 2030 targets for CO2 emissions reduction not reached - maybe half way to 43% reduction?
By 2030 AGW of +1.5 degrees the new norm and rising.
Life on Earth is screwed, maybe only slowly.

The consequence of Worst
Burn, baby, burn.

Trouble is, we only have Politicians.
Where are the Statesmen when you need them? The politics greasy pole system screens them out.
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"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
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kassy

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #39 on: August 07, 2021, 12:50:45 PM »
I like the ´leaked summary´ although it can still use some improvements for clarity (might attempt it in Strong Language Thread later).

Whenever is see 2030 i wonder if we had the BOE by then.

Summary of what is at stake, nothing we don´t know (pledging is free!) so skipping quotes:
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-56901261
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

gerontocrat

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #40 on: August 07, 2021, 10:40:08 PM »
Blah blah vs. Reality

Will India & China et al be impressed by this as they brief themselves for COP26 ?

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-08-06/biden-s-agenda-is-tainted-by-oil-interests-say-climate-advocates
Infrastructure Bill Has Big Wins for Oil, Climate Advocates Say
While the new bill includes big wins on some priorities, it also contains provisions to prop up fossil fuels.


Quote
When negotiators released the more-than-2,700-page text of the infrastructure bill now inching its way forward in the Senate this week, they discussed it as a glass half full — the first, imperfect step toward greening U.S. energy and industry.

To many looking at it from outside the government, however, what’s in that glass has been polluted.


Many of the bill’s provisions are on the oil industry’s wish list.
The proposed legislation has more than $10 billion for carbon capture, transport and storage — a suite of technologies fossil fuel companies hope will allow them to extend their license to operate for years, if not decades. There’s also $8 billion for hydrogen — with no stipulation that the energy used to produce it comes from clean sources. A new liquid natural gas plant in Alaska won billions in loan guarantees, while other waivers in the bill will weaken environmental reviews of new construction projects, experts say.

“This infrastructure proposal is not a down payment on real climate action,” said Mitch Jones, director of Food & Water Watch Policy, a Washington accountability organization. “It is doubling down on support for climate polluters.”

The bill does address some major climate change priorities, with $7.5 billion for a network of electric-vehicle chargers, $21.5 billion to create an Office of Clean Energy Demonstrations and $16 billion for energy efficiency and renewable energy. There’s money for resiliency projects and combating wildfires. But that has done nothing to reassure the environmental lobby’s most progressive wing, which has grown increasingly concerned that the oil industry is co-opting the administration’s agenda.

Much of that anxiety has coalesced around support for carbon capture. Last month, hundreds of climate groups wrote an open letter calling on Biden to reject carbon capture as a “dangerous distraction” to eliminating fossil fuels entirely. While the scientific consensus holds that carbon capture will be crucial to slowing atmospheric warming, many environmentalists fear it will also prolong the life of the fossil fuel industry, particularly in the U.S.

Currently, some 40 million tons of carbon are captured globally, the vast majority by energy companies for a process known as enhanced oil recovery, in which the gas is pumped back into the ground to force crude oil to the surface. “EOR is disastrous for the climate, as it results in more oil extraction and more carbon emissions when that oil is burned,” the environmental groups wrote in their letter.

Frank Macchiarola, a senior vice president with the American Petroleum Institute, which represents oil and natural gas interests, disagreed. He said in a statement that the group supports “the development of innovative technologies, like carbon capture and hydrogen, that will help achieve climate progress.”

He has allies in the climate advocacy world. Noah Deich, president and co-founder of Carbon 180, a group that advocates for carbon removal, said capture will be key to decarbonizing heavy industries such as steel and cement.

Deich understands the skepticism from climate groups, but doesn’t think the technology needs to enable oil production. “If done right, the bill could lead to a lot of carbon capture and recovery outside of the enhanced oil recovery space, and be a really good foundation for cleaning up heavy industry,” he said.

It’s not just carbon capture that irks the infrastructure bill’s critics. While there’s $5 billion to fund the purchase of clean-running school buses, half of that can be used for vehicles powered by cleaner-burning fossil fuels; those might be better for the environment than diesel, but not as clean as electric buses with no carbon emissions. Even the funding for EV charging infrastructure includes $2.5 billion of that could go to support vehicles that burn natural gas and propane, both of which burn more cleanly than gasoline, but which still contribute to global warming.

“When you look at the energy provisions in this bill, they are they are a boon to the fossil fuel industry and a dismal failure from the perspective of the climate,” said Carroll Muffett, chief executive officer of the Center for International Environmental Law, a non-profit firm with offices in Washington. The group is still working on a full accounting, but Muffett estimates that the bill includes more than $25 billion for technologies that are either “promoted or directly beneficial” to the fossil fuel industry.

President Joe Biden came to office promising a sweeping infrastructure bill that would create more environmentally friendly economy and power system while providing jobs. But it’s been a tough to get that agenda by a Senate that’s divided evenly between Democrats and Republicans. The bill could also face an uphill battle in the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives, where key players such as Transportation Committee Chair Peter DeFazio have already said it falls short on addressing the climate crisis.

Senate Democrats and the Biden administration have dealt with the discontent by saying they will use a separate budget bill that will require only 50 votes to enact more sweeping measures.

“While the bipartisan infrastructure package does not address the climate crisis at the scale and scope we need, I believe we will have an historic opportunity to meet this moment through the budget reconciliation process,” said Senator Ed Markey, a Democrat known as a climate progressive and Biden ally. “This will be a critical down payment on much more climate action in the months and years to come — both in Congress and at the ballot box.”

John Noel, a senior climate campaigner for Greenpeace, said the infrastructure bill’s shortfalls will spur advocates to focus on the companion measure.

“The reconciliation package needs to be the place where we challenge the power of the fossil fuel industry and all fossil fuel subsidies and, like, kick the industry into a managed decline,” he said. “The outrage at this bipartisan bill is our leverage to make it happen.”
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

blu_ice

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #41 on: August 08, 2021, 10:19:12 AM »
This is what comes out of the most pro-climate US administration ever. The next White House may very well be Republican. The rest of the world hasn’t forgot the last two Republican presidents walked out of the international climate agreements negotiated and signed by the US. The next one might just follow their lead.


Iain

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #42 on: August 08, 2021, 12:26:45 PM »
How much of the

"$10 billion for carbon capture"

Is to be used for EOR?

The article makes an association, but it's not clear there is a definite connection.

As CCS ramps up and oil consumption ramps down the excess CO2 would have to go into depleted gas fields.

"If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants." Isaac Newton

Iain

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #43 on: August 08, 2021, 01:17:32 PM »
Biden is constrained by a small majority, but even the UK Conservatives with an 80 seat majority and 43.6% of the vote have to keep an eye on their electorate:
https://uk.news.yahoo.com/boris-johnson-push-net-zero-190012449.html

Years back there were very generous FITs (payments for production) for wind, PV, Biomass, biogas….with a built in degression mechanism. PV got cheapest quickest, so the FITs for PV fell quickest.

Point is, they didn’t know which technology would get cheapest quickest when the FITs were first set. Going forward, it’s worthwhile supporting a wide range of possible solutions, including CCS.

In the end, the cheapest solution is most likely to be adopted. If that is CCS or Bluegreen hydrogen, it won't please the purists, but enough of a majority will ensure it's implemented.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2021, 01:33:23 PM by Iain »
"If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants." Isaac Newton

be cause

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #44 on: August 09, 2021, 04:46:13 PM »
IPCC report a 'wake up call' .. and a whole new generation of world leaders press the snooze button .
2007 + 5 = 2012 + 4 = 2016 + 3 = 2019 + 2 = 2021 + 1 .. you gotta laugh .. :)

Jim Hunt

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #45 on: August 09, 2021, 04:55:12 PM »
A whole new generation of world leaders press the snooze button .

According to the BBC:

Quote
Coal needs to be consigned to history to limit global warming, says PM Boris Johnson, describing a UN report on climate change as "sobering".

Mr Johnson said there needed to be a shift towards clean energy sources, as well as providing "climate finance for countries on the frontline".

The landmark study found it was "unequivocal" that human activity was responsible for global warming.

Labour said the UK could not "afford the inaction of this government".

The report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) - the UN group on the science of climate change - said climate change was already here and causing chaos in some places.

Its authors said some of the changes, including rising sea levels, would not be reversed for hundreds or maybe thousands of years.

The publication comes less than three months before the UK hosts a key climate summit, known as COP26, in Glasgow...

Alok Sharma, COP26 president, said one of the key messages of the report was that "the future is not yet written" and 1.5C was still an achievable goal, although retreating fast.

He said based on the conversations he had had, there was "a clear desire" among governments to "keep the 1.5C within reach".

But he said far more was needed in terms of action, adding "the cost of inaction on climate change is far greater than the cost of action".
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

Freegrass

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #46 on: August 09, 2021, 05:16:00 PM »
Politicians make it all sound so easy... Just ban coal! HOORAY! I am so smart! Vote for me! My pockets aren't full enough yet...

I guess nobody ever thought about all the energy and natural resources we'll need to make the big energy shift... There is no way in hell that we can do this! We've wasted too much time already, and now it's too late...

The only thing that can save us now is olivine. We need to start extracting huge amounts of CO2 from the atmosphere right now, and I haven't come across a better solution than olivine...

So happy Olivine is in the report!
« Last Edit: August 09, 2021, 06:27:30 PM by Freegrass »
When factual science is in conflict with our beliefs or traditions, we cuddle up in our own delusional fantasy where everything starts making sense again...

NeilT

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #47 on: August 09, 2021, 05:57:05 PM »
It all sounds good and all the articles say "it can absorb where nothing will grow".

Great.  Now let's have a think about this.  In order to use CO2 capture to cap emissions right now, what do we need.

We emit about 43 billion tonnes of CO2 per year.  Approximately half of that is absorbed by our flora, so we would have to spread and collect 21.5 Billion Tons of Olivine, every year, just to stand still.

Now if we want to go back to pre industrial CO2 levels, we need to get to about 285ppm.

43bn is around 2.2 ppm.  So 1ppm is around 19.5bn tons.  To suck out the excess CO2 since pre industrial, we need to shift 2.4 Trillion tons of CO2 out of the atmosphere.

At which point we need to be thinking of every single possible method we can use and Olivine will be one of many.  Also Olivine has a relatively slow takeup of CO2.  We would probably need to spread 100bn tonnes of olivine to get our 21.5 billion annually.

I'm not discounting it.  Just stating the fact that there is no magic bullet.  Not suddenly flipping the switch and switching coal off nor going all out for olivine.

In the end it will be emergency levels of everything, forestation, seaweed, olivine, other capture products and truly massive levels of renewable energy production.

In the end we'll need to capture far more "free" energy than we use daily just to try to get the CO2 out of the atmosphere.

The biggest issues are getting the politicians to understand the scale of the issue then getting them to commit to doing something about it when what they commit to, today, will not bear fruit until years after they are out of office.  Especially as they are hounded by, literally, thousands of "good causes" where they could gain their legacy whilst still in office.

For a politician, jam today is worth several desert banquets after they have left office.
Being right too soon is socially unacceptable.

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Freegrass

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #48 on: August 09, 2021, 06:19:09 PM »
<snip>We emit about 43 billion tonnes of CO2 per year.  Approximately half of that is absorbed by our flora, so we would have to spread and collect 21.5 Billion Tons of Olivine, every year, just to stand still. <snip>
I don't disagree with you NeilT. The task is huge! If not impossible... But to put the numbers you just posted in perspective; The world consumes 8,561,852,178 tons of coal per year as of the year 2016.
https://www.worldometers.info/coal/#coal-consumption

So we already know how to dig up almost 10 billion tons of coal every year. If we stop digging up coal, and put those people to work in digging up twice that amount of olivine, it is possible to do this. And then those miners won't be out of a job...

But you're right, there is no magic bullet.... But I sure like this cannonball!
When factual science is in conflict with our beliefs or traditions, we cuddle up in our own delusional fantasy where everything starts making sense again...

NeilT

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Re: COP26 in Glasgow
« Reply #49 on: August 09, 2021, 07:42:51 PM »
But you're right, there is no magic bullet.... But I sure like this cannonball!

Better digging up Olivine, yes.  But then they have to move and process that 20bn tonnes each year.

Someone has to pay for it too.  There's the problem.  We need everyone to recognise that not solving the problem will destroy everything and build a fund to resolve it.  The problem is nobody will want to pay for it and everyone will think they are paying too much.

Humans 1.0.  Soon to be close to extinct.  Not a huge amount we can do about it but it should never just be ignored.
Being right too soon is socially unacceptable.

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